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Comment Re:Its pretty important... (Score 1) 302

It's a shame more people don't realize this, as evidenced by the multiple posts on here suggesting that people need to relocate. I've lived all over the country, but I've spent the majority of my life here in Louisiana and I'd like to stay here.

The majority of the folks affected by this live in areas such as Plaquemines, Terrebone, and Lafourche parishes aren't rich by any means. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... They were born here; to suggest that they just pack up and move is pretty short-sighted and somewhat insulting.

The notion that people must be immune to relocation just because they "were born there" is an insult to human nature. Conditions change, Things go south, .Shit happens. People relocate, never to return. It's what humans do. It's what humans are meant to do.

Comment Re:As opposed to Amazon Prime? (Score 1) 81

How is SQS, RDS, S3, etc from the AWS stack not a lock-in? They're proprietary API's that are specific to a single vendor. Choosing to not use them significantly dilutes the value proposition of moving to AWS in the first place. There's a lot of people that can do "servers in the cloud", what differentiates AWS is the software and services they provide on top of that.

I like the AWS stack, don't get me wrong, but the lock-in is pretty much there from day one.

SQS and RDS, do you really need to use them? What stops you from using your own RabbitMQ and MySQL instances (or the many other alternatives) on AWS? And if you use a robust abstraction layer (say, Spring Messaging, Spring Data, Hibernate, myBatis, Python SQLAlchemy or whatever that applies to your platform), the distinction becomes irrelevant.

This is unlike a lock-in with, say, Oracle IDM for identity management or TSD for time series data, or when you adopt a WebLogic extension to work around a JEE limitation (instead of writing your own workaround.) This is far more pervasive and hard to walk away from once you go down that path (I know, I see it around me.) These lock-ins are incredibly hard, if not impossible to insulate yourself with abstraction layers. So SQS and RDS are not pervasive lock-ins built around a substantial need, but as conveniences you can walk away or wrap around with an abstraction layer.

S3, it is so damned ubiquitous and oh so incredibly useful and resilient that it doesn't make sense *not* to leverage it. Additionally, the lock in is the URI. The mechanism to access it is via REST, so what is there to stop you from accessing and posting your content on your own content repository (deployed on AWS or elsewhere)? Again, the lock-in is simply not comparable to Oracle's because the lock-in is not architectural in nature.

Comment Re:As opposed to Amazon Prime? (Score 1) 81

"No longer does the process involve the purchase of heavy proprietary software with multi-year contracts that include annual maintenance fees. " I guess the two sides really don't know how each other works....

What does AWS have to do with Prime? And what type of license lock-in do they have that compares to Oracle's? You can cancel anyone at any time almost without penalty (other than forfeiting a refund if you cancel before your contract), nor do you have a pervasive multi-thousand-dollar per-core license lock-in with either, do you?

I've worked in multiple Oracle shops, so I know what that lock-in entails. With that comparison of yours, I don't you know what you are talking about?

Additionally, as long as you don't really lock yourself to a AWS-specific framework or architecture, like, say, AWS Lambda, you really have little lock in. Whether is is a JEE system or a Ruby system or whatever backed by any major data store (MySQL, Postgress, Cassandra, whatever), if you are deploying on an AWS instance, you very much can do the same with a local instance using the same OS.

OTH, and I known from experience, when you work with the Oracle stack, not just the database but also any or all products built on top of its database or WebLogic, you lock yourself in architecturally very easily. Oh shit, there you go, you are now tied to say, Oracle SOA or ADF, or IDM or with WebLogic JEE extensions.

I actually like Oracle products, and having access to their support network is awesome. But I recognize the significantly devious ways in which Oracle ties you in if you are not careful (and let's face it, most developers and architects aren't.) Ergo the lock-in.

You barely see that with AWS, or even Azure. So...

Comment Re:As opposed to Amazon Prime? (Score 1) 81

"No longer does the process involve the purchase of heavy proprietary software with multi-year contracts that include annual maintenance fees. " I guess the two sides really don't know how each other works....

What does AWS have to do with Prime? And what type of license lock-in do they have that compares to Oracle's? You can cancel anyone at any time almost without penalty (other than forfeiting a refund if you cancel before your contract), nor do you have a pervasive multi-thousand-dollar per-core license lock-in with either, do you?

I've worked in multiple Oracle shops, so I know what that lock-in entails. With that comparison of yours, I don't you know what you are talking about?

Comment Re:Attitudes (Score 1) 81

Me: I don't want your clouds, why should I waste my bandwidth and endure slow access times when I can store my files and my backups locally?

Because most likely AWS provides a level of redundancy and failure tolerance that you will never be able to achieve. If it works for you, good for you. Stick to it. But don't pretend your requirements match the ones found in general.

But the most important reason why, the real answer to you question lies in the following decision: your infrastructure costs, do you want them to be capex or opex? Which one do you really need in order to operate, or even to get off the ground?

If you don't understand this, fine, but that means you are not even prepared to understand why people would choose the cloud. For there are more reasons other than bandwidth and throughput that a business must consider in order to operate.

Comment Re:Starship Troopers (Score 1) 1219

Body armor that may as well have been regular clothing for all the good it did? This was a frustrating movie.

I always wondered why they even bothered to wear the body armor when it couldn't even stop their own weapons, not to mention the bugs themselves. That and the fact that none of the rifles even had sights kind of blew my mind. When you are fighting as infantry against thousands and hundreds of thousands of enemies, spraying and praying is really not the best idea. And, for a semi-fascist, military-industrial complex led society, they surprisingly had no idea of combined arms tactics. No armored vehicles, no air support, no artillery. Just lots and lots of people. It was like the WWII-era Red Army in space. The closest thing they had was the bombing run on the one planet followed up by an infantry attack, but clearly the staff officer school for the Federation military doesn't go into much detail on WWI or WWII, otherwise they would have realized that pre-attack bombardments are pretty useless against enemy combatants that are entrenched or bunkered underground.

You'd think that by this time, they'd have thousand-gigaton nukes that could penetrate deep into the ground or even better/simpler, the means to rain 1-ton balls of tungsten accelerated at, say, 10K/sec.

Comment Being stuck while solving a problem (Score 1) 148

The paper -- titled "On the Unhappiness of Software Developers" -- found that the top cause of unhappiness was being stuck while solving a problem, followed by "time pressure," bad code quality/coding practices, and "under-performing colleague."

Isn't that the whole nature of software. Any challenging work worth doing is going to get you blocked at some point or another, and it is one of the reasons we get paid well (compared to other professions.) If shit were easy, we would never get blocked. And then it would be the type of work anyone could do it.

Honestly, me no get it.

Comment Re:I was most frustrated by ... (Score 3, Insightful) 148

What about having to do tedious and redundant work because leadership refuses to prioritize internal tooling and environment upgrades,

What about it? Life sucks. Shit sucks. You either settle and collect your paycheck, or you go to another company. Not all companies are like what you describe, so why do stay where you don't like working? Stop being a bitch. Stop complaining and change to a company that you like working for.

Have non-technicians constantly reject good ideas because they can't understand them, and don't bother trying to,

Being asked to work extra to meet arbitrary deadlines that have absolutely nothing motivating them,

Re-doing the same task three times because the stakeholders cannot make up their minds,

having to work in an open office that is full of noise, socializing, and distracting all the goddamn time while leadership just closes their office doors?

I don't know whether or not you would call these "pressing issues," but they sure make MY job suck.

Same bitching. No one owns you a dream job. Go out and seek it. Life is too short to be bitching about bad employers.

Comment Re:I was most frustrated by ... (Score 1) 148

Being blocked from doing small fixes by Sarbanes-Oxley and management. But really Sarbanes Oxley.

Prior to SOX, I could see a problem- fix it, refactor the code.. etc. or see a minor improvement- implement it, refactor the code, etc.

After SOX, I had to run everything thru the team lead who had to justify it to the manager who had to justify to the director who had to justify it to the senior director who had to justify it to the Department head, who had to justify it (in a group of other changes) to the CIO.

Just the overhead meant that something which would make the code 2% better was blocked many times per year. Not worth the ROI.

And the overhead meant that improvements to the code which would make future maintenance easier were never approved any more. So the code just got harder to maintain over time.

The time constraints would also be important. I didn't really care about co-workers performance. That was between them and management.

If SOX gets in your way to fix shit so much that makes you unhappy, there is something wrong with you, you wild cowboy you (or with the organization you work for, or both.) I've worked in SOX-bound companies, and that never really got in the way to get shit done. You simply become more organized. I mean gee, what's bad about firewalling root access to production and knowing what hands touches what (which is at the root of SOX in terms of IT.)?

SOX is there for a reason, and the ability to just "fix it" is not necessarily an indication of good software engineering practices.

Comment Re:Difficult, enjoyable, productivity, consequence (Score 1) 245

I have a PhD in CS and have coded in many many languages.

In other words, "I have worked a lot in fake environments in many languages".

Your ego must be very fragile to be trigger like this.

You got a PhD in part because of a language that is controversial, and you consider that a win? The value of a CS PhD just dropped a few points.

That's not what he said, but obviously, it is your right to put words into his mouth. Keep banging that strawman, I don't judge.

Comment Re:Java is garbage (Score 1) 245

I've got a long list but can't be arsed to find it. Off the top of my head:

-No out parameters for functions; you have to pass values you want to return or modify through the return value or through a struct ref in the parameter list. -No unsigned integer types. (No, Integer.divideUnsigned() and the rest do not count.) -Date/time libraries were complete garbage up until recently. -No goto. (I can hear you getting ready to type "B-but Dijkstra said..." Fuck Dijkstra. There's a small but valid list of cases where goto is the right tool for the job (read the Wikipedia article if you are ignorant) but Java doesn't have it like every other civilized language does.)

Java is baby-proofed language because of the rather low quality of the programmers expected to use it.

All these amount to nothing more than dogmatic statements pretending to be axiomatic. I share some of these, but as pet-peeves, nothing more. Nothing in it impedes a competent worker from using it to create quality work (this also applies to Groovy, C#, C/C++, Python and several other languages I've worked with as well.)

Comment Re:Legality (Score 1) 233

Not doing what a police officer orders? At that point it doesn't matter - you have to comply. The place to argue an unlawful police order is a court of law.

So if a police officer orders you to kill yourself, or the person next to you ... you comply and then argue that in a court of law?

^^^ This. I am troubled by the amount of people in /. (and real life) that seem hell bent in defining rights as the narrow subset defined by a law (Rosa Parks would disagree with them) and/or (in the case of airline tickets) adhesion contracts that enforce an inequality of bargaining power on consumers.

Comment Re:Legality (Score 1) 233

It was NOT over booked, they wanted seats to transports staff.

Yes. They could have acknowledged their screw-up and raised the sum they were offering (their last offer was, what, $800?), provided an alternative means of transportation, or whatever.

Yeah, that may have appeared expensive, but I hope that it will appear cheap compared to the costs of this case.

^^^ Finally a thread chain that gets it.

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