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Comment Re:My take (Score 1) 504

David Heinemeier Hansson, a well-known programmer and the creator of the popular Ruby on Rails coding framework, started it when he tweeted, "Hello, my name is David. I would fail to write bubble sort on a whiteboard. I look code up on the internet all the time. I don't do riddles."

I don't buy the notion that someone with a CS degree cannot implement bubblesort on a whiteboard, regardless of real life accomplishments. With that said, his last sentence (I look code up on the internet all the time), that's the motto I live by.

Someone asks me how do you call function X on Y api?, and I'll answer that's what google is for, I don't memorize minutia. And I'd walk away from an interview that requires me to code something non-trivial without an internet connection. I'd work on a whiteboard to illustrate my problem solving skills, but ask me minutia or expect me to code without a reference?

Nope, I'm out. Life is short, there is plenty of game out there, and I'm too old for this junior level game playing shit.

Additionally, I do not pity people who find the game demoralizing. There are more demoralizing things in life, like cancer or poverty. Interviews? They are demoralizing because you let them. That's just part of the game. Build the mindset to waddle through shit creek till you get what you want.

Demoralizing yourself because the interview process is the stupidest exercise of self-indulgence ever.

Comment My take (Score 1) 504

David Heinemeier Hansson, a well-known programmer and the creator of the popular Ruby on Rails coding framework, started it when he tweeted, "Hello, my name is David. I would fail to write bubble sort on a whiteboard. I look code up on the internet all the time. I don't do riddles."

I don't buy the notion that someone with a CS degree cannot implement bubblesort on a whiteboard, regardless of real life accomplishments. With that said, his last sentence (I look code up on the internet all the time), that's the motto I live by.

Someone asks me how do you call function X on Y api?, and I'll answer that's what google is for, I don't memorize minutia. And I'd walk away from an interview that requires me to code something non-trivial without an internet connection. I'd work on a whiteboard to illustrate my problem solving skills, but ask me minutia or expect me to code without a reference?

Nope, I'm out. Life is short, there is plenty of game out there, and I'm too old for this junior level game playing shit.

Comment Re:I'll answer this one. (Score 1) 504

I'll add the following:

David Heinemeier Hansson, a well-known programmer and the creator of the popular Ruby on Rails coding framework, started it when he tweeted, "Hello, my name is David. I would fail to write bubble sort on a whiteboard. I look code up on the internet all the time. I don't do riddles."

I call bullshit on this. His background claims to have a BS in CS. There is no fucking way *not* to know bubble sort after getting a CS degree (unless in Denmark a CS degree is more like an IT or MIS degree, which is fair and understandable then.)

Comment Re:I'll answer this one. (Score 1) 504

It epends. If you have a Masters degree in Computer Science, and you can't explain NP Complete, IMHO you have wasted a lot of time and money.

Undergraduate degree? Its a cr*p shoot. Some programs require learning about P vs. NP, and some don't.

^^^ This. Similarly, I wouldn't recall how to implement a red/black tree or tarjan's algorithm.

OTH, I would expect anyone with a CS background to implement bubble sort, quicksort, a bi-directional linked list, and a hash table without significant problems.

Comment Re:Depends. (Score 1) 792

I make $160k base (+ unreliable yearly small bonus), live in Silicon Valley, own a house in one of the nicer cities (read: not shit hole), have 2 kids who get everything they need, my wife does not earn a paycheck, and we received no help from family. It is not unreasonable for a single tech worker making $160k with $3300 rent to live well in the bay area. People scraping by at that paycheck have have different priorities.

Where at in SV do you own a house, and what size? What's your commute? I'm interested. My research was done from the remoteness of South Florida. Would be nice to get some intel from the ground.

Comment Re: Overboard, Sad! (Score 1) 346

I'm not entirely sure what an "iron mallet" is, but 2 pounds is like 2 blocks of butter. It's pretty heavy weight to fall on you from a tall height, but it really depends on the density, shape and elasticity of what is hitting you. 1 kg of feathers landing on you probably won't do a lot of damage, a 1kg cube of lead would likely kill you. The average shape and materials of drones, being plastic which is usually somewhat springy, will fit somewhere in the middle between lead and feathers. Anyway it's not immediately obvious that a 1kg drone falling from a height would be particularly legal on average.

I'm pretty sure a 2lbs drone is a lot more solid than 2lbs of butter or 2lbs of feathers. Not as dense as a mallet, but dense enough to transfer enough kinetic juice to kill you if it hits you in the right place.

Comment Re:Good. (Score 1) 346

There's a difference here between criminal and civil action. There's a fairly good chance she's going to sue him in civil court, (and settle for doctor bills, time off work, maybe some pain and suffering compensation etc) and that alone could be quite punishing. Don't think of this criminal sentence as the retribution for the crime, that will come later.

This is all about the criminal case. Try to keep in mind it is supposed to weigh things like criminal intent, deliberate as well as actual negligence with respect to the public, etc. There certainly was negligence here, but is the punishment appropriate?

If I'm riding my bicycle down the sidewalk (which is illegal in this city btw, you're supposed to keep to the streets to avoid hitting peds) and I am talking with my friend behind me and don't see that ped on the sidewalk and run into them, knock them down, I'm likely to do more damage to them than most drones. Maybe I even give the 'ol gal a mild concussion when she hits the sidewalk. There was no criminal intent, I didn't intend to be negligent but in the end I was. (and in this case I was even breaking a law, which here is used primarily simply to make the collision undeniably my fault, rather than to ticket or arrest me) Now, in addition to any civil case she may file against me, do I deserve a month in jail?

Depends on the injury I would supposed, but in my book, yeah, in the hypothetical case, you were grossly negligent and where one cunt hair away from causing grave harm or even death.

It's like, if I'm texting and driving and I kill or hurt someone, I deserve to go to jail. Same with a bicycle. From an ethical POV, whether the law specifically says so, I'd say any person (myself included) who injures someone from gross negligence when conducting something that is not even vital, yeah, jail time.

Comment Complex Problem/Simple Solution (Score 1) 792

This is a problem of supply and demand. There are not enough apartments, condos and high-rises within reasonable commuting distance (combined with an extensive public metro/subway system) to meet demand.

Simple solution: revisit building codes to allow construction of high occupancy residential buildings. Lots of them. Everywhere. An economically strong area that spans from San Francisco to San Jose, it should be brimming with high rises and apartment buildings.

But that won't happen because ZOMG we have to maintain the city character and shit. In other words, selfishness and ego.

Comment Re:Subsistance?? (Score 1) 231

Nowhere in the article does it mention how many of these villagers were on the constant edge of starvation prior to having access to a more varied diet. It does mention they do shorter foraging routes than they did 25 years ago, but doesn't mention how that would reasonably mean they would starve without outside sources of food. Oh, and then there's the nugget that they are BETTER at digesting carbs and sugars than Europeans, which leads them to eat significantly more..

This article is full of lies and half truths subby!

In modern times, they have not been on the constant edge of starvation.

Comment Re: Poor on $100k? Sure (Score 1) 792

It's actually quite true in many states in the middle of the country. Even in California as long as you don't need to live in a large metropolitan area, you can get reasonably priced housing. Shop Oklahoma City OK, Pensacola FL and similar places on zillow.com and see for yourself. You can get a nice, nice house for no more than two year's salary.

And a completely barren job market for when shit hits the fan (which always does.) I live 9 hours away from Pensacola. I wouldn't move there at all, even if I earned the lottery. There is barely anything there in terms of jobs or education for my children. There are costs associated to living in flyover country that most people do not realize.

Comment Re:Funny numbers from a mechanical engineer (Score 1) 792

Last year my taxable income was $190000. You can buy shares in my employer. I wouldn't.

So, 16 years ago I paid a year's pay at the time (85k) in cash for a solid, but unattractive, house in a working class, decent suburb.

Three years ago, after I got a lot of pay rises, because good real engineers are well paid, I paid 300k cash to have it knocked down and a new one built. That is now worth 600k.

So which of you dummies in the IT game can't figure out how to do that?

Meanwhile, I bought a weekender. For cash. But that was mainly to annoy you lot.

Good for you. I doubt I would want to pull something like that (and I guess it depends on where you live.) For me to do that, I'd have to buy a house in a neighborhood that might be decent (in terms of citizens) but with a shitty school district.

Once I demolish (after all the permit costs) and build a new house (after all the costs of rebuilding), yeah I'd have a house that is nominally 2x the original price. But how much would I put in? And how much would my ROI would be (certainly not 2x the original cost)? And then what, put the kids in a shitty school or add the expense of a private school?

Nah, I'd rather pay the more expensive monthly price tag by living in a more expensive area, without the hassles of playing "construction firm" and without having to put my kids in a private school (because a good school is not optional for me.)

Your solution might work for you (kudos for you). It doesn't mean it is a general solution for others, specially others with kids.

Comment Re: Poor on $100k? Sure (Score 1) 792

General recommendations are 5-10 years salary to be spent on a house.

LOL, only in Silicon Valley bizarro-world (or NYC, or DC). In sane parts of the country, the normal recommendation is three years' salary.

Exactly. And I doubt a sane bank would lend anyone for a house above 3-4 times one's salary unless a person has substantial savings (way above 1 years of GROSS salary.)

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