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Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Best Device for Internet Browsing with Parkinson's Disease?

lloydchristmas759 writes: My father-in-law was diagnosed two years ago with Parkinson's disease. Until now, his treatment allowed him to keep working full time (his job requires a lot of manual work), but recently his symptoms (mainly muscle stiffness and pain in the arms and legs) deteriorated to a point where he will have to go to part time employment until he retires in two years. Even though he is completely computer illiterate, he has shown interest in learning to browse the web and do e-mails to occupy his free time.
Given his condition, what is your advice on the kind of device he should use?
If laptop: With or without touch screen? Mouse or touchpad? Which operating system?
If Tablet: Which make and OS? Any accessories?

I am especially asking Slashdotters who have a relative (or themselves) in similar situations, but any insightful suggestions are welcome.

Submission + - Microsoft is allegedly Selling Nokia to Foxconn

SmartAboutThings writes: It's no secret that Microsoft's phone business isn't going according to plan. Last quarter alone saw a 46% drop in phone revenue, slightly better than the 49% drop the quarter before that.

And now it seems that Microsoft is finally realizing this: according to rumors, the tech giant is considering licensing 50% of its mobile business to Foxconn — in other words, the Nokia brand it had purchased for 10 years, until 2024. It appears that negotiations have reached very advanced stages, with Microsoft and Foxconn currently deliberating the final clauses of the deal.

Submission + - New Raspberry Pi Zero Gets Camera Connector

Mickeycaskill writes: The super-cheap Raspberry Pi Zero that originally sold out within 24 hours after being given away by a magazine is now equipped with a camera connector.

“When we launched Raspberry Pi Zero last November, it’s fair to say we were blindsided by the level of demand,” said Eben Upton, Raspberry Pi Foundation. “We immediately sold every copy of MagPi issue 40 and every Zero in stock at our distributors; and every time a new batch of Zeros came through from the factory they’d sell out in minutes.

“To complicate matters, Zero then had to compete for factory space with Raspberry Pi 3, which was ramping for launch at the end of February. Happily, [we were] able to take advantage of the resulting production hiatus to add the most frequently demanded “missing” feature to Zero: a camera connector.”

The Raspberry Pi Zero is still powered by a 1GHz Broadcom BCM2835 processor and 512MB of RAM and has MicroSD, mini-HDMI and micro USB connectors for data and power. A camera is connected using a custom six inch adapter cable but users must have the latest version of Raspbian OS installed.

The Raspberry Pi 3 was released on the fourth anniversary of the launch of the original device, adding integrated Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and a more powerful processor. So far, eight million units have been sold to educational institutions, hobbyists and businesses.

Comment Re:So, how did ... (Score 1) 253

Actually, the engine case is designed to withstand blade failures, including fan blades, compressor blades and turbine blades, but not disc failures. Usually, discs fail when the engine is overspeed, when the centrifugal forces are higher than what the disc was designed to withstand. This is why the ECU/FADEC/EEC will shut the engine down immediately when it detects an overspeed condition on any of the shafts.

The case of QF32 you cite was indeed a disc failure. You can see a section of the failed disc here. The turbine blades were mounted in the notches you can see on the outer diameter of the disc. The disc punctured through the wing (including the fuel tank), as you can see here and here.

Comment Re:It doesn't matter. (Score 1) 1105

This is utterly wrong!

You don't need to reduce your living space or reduce climate control to reduce your CO2 emissions. Just having higher standards for thermal insulation and heating/cooling of houses can reduce the energy consumption of the average crappy American house by 75% (note: almost all the buildings in the US have a very poor energy efficiency). Thicker and more efficient insulation layers in the walls/roof/floor, double glazing with good sealing for the windows, a condensing boiler (or better: a heat pump) for heating and hot water, a few thermal solar cells on the roof, and a reasonably efficient air conditioning: these things will probably add 10-15% to the total construction cost of a house, but will easily be amortized over 2 decades (just by the reduced energy consumption).

And regarding the other things like walking instead of driving, that's riduculous. Just begin by buying a car with a reasonable gas milage (hint: you don't need a 5000-lb vehicle with a 5000cc engine to go to work every day). And support an improvement of mass transit where it is sound (hint: using mass transit actually supports it).

Eating less meat, yeah, that's probably a good thing to do. But the good news is: you can eat better meat. Eat 2 filet mignon per week instead of 8 burgers.

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