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Comment Re:My favorite dirty Windows 10 trick (Score 1) 500

Yes, this! This is what most people have done when they saying Microsoft magically updated their machine with out asking permission. I know because I was a victim of the same thing, when you click "Later" which is your only other option (unless you X out) Microsoft schedules a date for the upgrade without telling you and unless you catch it before hand, you'll come home one day to a Win10 machine.

Submission + - Has the 'impossible' EM drive being tested by NASA finally been explained? (examiner.com) 1

MarkWhittington writes: The EM drive, the so-called “impossible” space drive that uses no propellant, has roiled the aerospace world for the past several years, ever since it was proposed by British aerospace engineer Robert Shawyer. In essence, the claim advanced by Shawyer and others is that if you bounced microwaves in a truncated cone, thrust would be produced out the open end. Most scientists have snorted at the idea, noting correctly that such a thing would violate physical laws. However, organizations as prestigious as NASA have replicated the same results, that prototypes of the EM drive produces thrust. How does one reconcile the experimental results with the apparent scientific impossibility? MIT Technology Review suggested a reason why.

Submission + - Cadaver study casts doubts on how zapping brain may boost mood, relieve pain (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Earlier this month, György Buzsáki of New York University in New York City showed a slide that sent a murmur through an audience in the Grand Ballroom of New York’s Midtown Hilton during the annual meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society. It wasn’t just the grisly image of a human cadaver with more than 200 electrodes inserted into its brain that set people whispering; it was what those electrodes detected—or rather, what they failed to detect. When Buzsáki and his colleague, Antal Berényi of the University of Szeged in Hungary, mimicked an increasingly popular form of brain stimulation by applying alternating electrical current to the outside of the cadaver’s skull, the electrodes inside registered little. Hardly any current entered the brain. On closer study, the pair discovered that up to 90% of the current had been redirected by the skin covering the skull, which acted as a “shunt,” Buzsáki said. For many meeting attendees, the unusual study heightened serious doubts about the mechanism and effectiveness of transcranial direct current stimulation, an experimental, noninvasive treatment that uses electrodes to deliver weak current to a person’s scalp or forehead.

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