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The Nuts and Bolts of PlayStation 3D 154

The Digital Foundry blog took an in-depth look at how Sony is introducing 3D technology to PlayStation 3 games. They give a step-by-step description of how the system generates a 3D frame (or rather, a pair of frames), and the graphical hurdles that need be to overcome to ensure the games look good. The article also discusses some of the subtle effects 3D technology can have on gameplay: "'One interesting thing came through in the immersion aspect was that in the first-person camera view, it felt so much more like being there. Typically when most people play MotorStorm, something like 90 per cent play in the third-person view,' Benson explains. 'As soon as we put the 3D settings in place, the first-person view became a lot more popular, a lot more people were using that view. This could indicate that 3D could perhaps change the standards, if you like.' ... 'We found that in the first-person view the game is giving you all the sorts of cues that you're used to in normal driving: speed perception, the ability to judge distances, things like that. It's far easier to avoid track objects.' The insertion of true stereoscopic 3D into MotorStorm also brings about a new sense of appreciation of the scale and size of the game world and the objects within it."

Pirates as a Marketplace 214

John Riccitiello, the CEO of Electronic Arts, made some revealing comments in an interview with Kotaku about how the company's attitudes are shifting with regard to software piracy. Quoting: "Some of the people buying this DLC are not people who bought the game in a new shrink-wrapped box. That could be seen as a dark cloud, a mass of gamers who play a game without contributing a penny to EA. But around that cloud Riccitiello identified a silver lining: 'There's a sizable pirate market and a sizable second sale market and we want to try to generate revenue in that marketplace,' he said, pointing to DLC as a way to do it. The EA boss would prefer people bought their games, of course. 'I don't think anybody should pirate anything,' he said. 'I believe in the artistry of the people who build [the games industry.] I profoundly believe that. And when you steal from us, you steal from them. Having said that, there's a lot of people who do.' So encourage those pirates to pay for something, he figures. Riccitiello explained that EA's download services aren't perfect at distinguishing between used copies of games and pirated copies. As a result, he suggested, EA sells DLC to both communities of gamers. And that's how a pirate can turn into a paying customer."

Comment Anybody feeling nostalgic after reading this? (Score 1) 351

I remember coding away at my keyboard with Borland C++ 3.1, TASM & Turbo Pascal 7.0 back when i was a kid. Looking back it was some of the best programming experiences i've had in my life, even though the code quality was probably crappy.

Anyone else yearning for the days when programming was low level and just getting a stupid plasma effect to work smoothly gave you that warm fuzzy feeling in your stomach?

Even though we have it really good now (thank god for OS X, decent IDEs & Libraries) a lot of fun factor seems to have dissapeared. It doesn't matter what you write somebody else has already done a lot of the hard stuff for you (most of the time anyway) in the libs you use.

Comment Re:As any industrial psychologist or human enginee (Score 1) 99


Which planet do these guys live on, that it's normal to work 16 hours/day without looking for better management alternatives?

If you're going to work that much you may as well start your own company doing whatever it is you want to do. That way you get 100% say in how things are run & you 100% of the dinero.

Really strange, these people don't seem to have any lives whatsoever outside work. Kinda sad when you think about it!

Comment Etch a giant Penis onto it.... (Score 1) 993

Seriously, women are coming up to you in public, commenting on your hardware & you're complaining?

Dude, I (and i'm sure many a geek/hacker type) have enough trouble complaining why my place looks like a server farm without women running out of the house screaming (the anime doesn't help either).

Consider yourself lucky & focus on using your laptop to create something cool. Otherwise there are many many "hacker" 1995 stickers to make you look "cool".

Comment This post makes me feel old (Score 1) 569

I dont' get kids these days. The reason I (and a lot of people of my generation) learned to program was to code/hack cool shit!

Nowadays it seems very rare to find a 13 year old hacking games or teaching himself assembler just for the fun of it. People just seem to want to learn stuff to finish school courses & land decent jobs.

Where is the fun element? I get that some people just like solving problems and see computers as just another tool to do it. But what about the hacker breed? People learning stuff just for the fun of it, not for profit?

While these people are still bred into existance I fear the point & click generation of operating systems and the "commercialization" (take that to mean what you will) of computers & the internet has taken the fun out of it.

A computer is now just a tool, not some cool strict machine that does just what you tell it and punishes you if you make mistakes & act stupid. Sometimes I truly do wish it was the late 80s/early 90s when it was so easy to write something cool and people who wanted to program didn't ask these sorts of questions.

Please forgive my rant, you may now go on with your lives fellow Slashdot readers.

Comment why enforce this? (Score 1) 378

I don't know what's worse, the fact that such ridiculous laws exist or the fact the goverment rigidly enforces it.

I mean, come on. Send the guy a letter actually means that they had meetings about this and actively pursue suing people who wish to state facts. Facts mind you the publication of which doesn't incure financial loss to the Australian government. Fictional lala (RIAA) land loss or real world monetary loss.

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Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds. -- Albert Einstein