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Comment Re:How nice of Facebook to take time out of... (Score 1) 485

You truly believe that, don't you?

That is called self-acceptance. Accepting my lot in life does not mean I should be claiming enlightenment due to my ailment/impairment/shitty fucking lifestyle choices, it came from deep introspection and a truckload of work. That should be the message.

Fat acceptance says I should accept that fat people are beautiful, too. Fuck that.

I had been fat all my life (still about 20lbs over my ideal BMI), like seriously fat. Morbidly obese was the term. I worked my ass off to lose half my body mass.

Losing weight didn't grant me enlightenment, it just made me lighter. Enlightenment came from the years of mental struggle, overcoming my own demons that got me to that weight.

Fuck that. Celebrating what makes a person shitty is not good.

But what do I know, I don't own a media outlet.

Privacy

Can Switzerland Become a Safe Haven For the World's Data? (dailydot.com) 103

An anonymous reader shares an interesting article on Daily Dot which lists a number of reasons why Switzerland should be deemed as the nation for storing all of your data. The article reads: As United States and European Union regulators debate a sweeping new data-privacy agreement, Switzerland is presenting itself as a viable neutral location for storing the world's data thanks to strict privacy laws and ideal infrastructure. The Swiss constitution guarantees data privacy under Article 13. The country's laws protecting privacy are similar to those enacted by the E.U. Swiss data protections are also, in some cases, much stricter than those of the E.U., according to Nicola Benz, attorney at Swiss law firm Froriep. And since Switzerland is not part of the E.U., data stored there remains outside the reach of the union's authorities. [...] The country's tight privacy laws could make the small nation more attractive to privacy-focused start-ups. And it already has that momentum. After the former NSA contractor Edward Snowden 2013 revelations about the National Security Agency's secret surveillance activities, Switzerland witnessed something of a boom in its data-center business. Phil Zimmermann, creator of the popular PGP encryption protocol and founder of Silent Circle, even left the U.S. for Switzerland last year, citing the overreach of American authorities. Andy Yen, CEO of Swiss-based encrypted email service Protonmail, said that the country has robust processes in how it carries out data requests from authorities. Data requests have to go through a court like in most countries, said Yen, but "the person that's having their data requested needs to be notified eventually about the request happening and there's an opportunity to fight it in an open court. This is quite different than the U.S., where things can go through a so-called FISA court."

Comment 23 years!! Holy crap I feel old! (Score 2) 136

Living in Allston in the early 90's and some friends of mine (L0pht, NewHackCity, CDC, etc...) ran all kinds of boxen. Solaris, Mac, and something brand new called Linux. I loved the power and efficiency. I loved how configurable it was. I wasn't even in college at the time (broke adult).

Slackware on a 486dx4-25. Gotta admit, I miss the days of hacking hardware to get it to do what you want.

God, remember when Linux fit on a floppy?

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