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Comment Re:I'm not surprised. (Score 1) 917

"IP" is a bogus, meaningless term. What do you actually mean? Copyright? There are fair use exceptions to copyright in the USA, and fair dealing allowed uses in other parts. Note that in the USA, reproducing copyrighted material for the purpose of "criticism" may be considered fair use.

Comment Re:I'm not surprised. (Score 1) 917

Asking subordinates for sex is wrong. That there was no explicit threat made against her if she rejected does not make it acceptable.

If you think otherwise, well most of the rest of society disagrees with you in many parts of the western world: a manager who does the above _must_ be disciplined (in some meaningful way), or else the company has opened itself up to legal liabilities. A company that ignores multiple such complaints against a manager is going to find itself paying out a lot money when it loses the inevitable employment law court case.

Comment Re:I'm not surprised. (Score 1) 917

A manager propositioning subordinates is essentially always wrong.

Even in some unlikely situation where the subordinate had unambiguously and clearly been signalling sexual interest in the manager, over a sustained period of time, the manager would be _very_ ill-advised to enter into non-professional relations while the employee was a subordinate or the employee's career could in any way be perceived to be influenceable by the manager. The manager should just not go there, full stop.

In this specific case, she'd been there one day, so we can rule out that highly unlikely scenario, and conclude that if such a proposition was made it was clear misconduct.

Mature, large companies (least, that I'm familiar with) have fairly strict rules banning relations between managers and subordinates for very good reason. Precisely because such relations are very likely to be unhealthy and improper: For the manager, for the subordinate, for other subordinates of the manager, and for the company.

Comment Re:Wrong. (Score 1) 482

I did work for Google and have since retired. So point not invalid.

As someone who has interviewed nearly 200 people to do work like mine, I'm very much aware how rare my skills are. And I'm also aware how many CVs and phone screens happened before I saw those people. So no, not confirmation bias.

I'm also aware that it's not a huge amount of work to acquire those skills. Particularly now with loads of free resources one can use to learn more. Invest a little money and you could have your own rpi kubernetes cluster for a few hundred bucks. You can run hadoop or spark or hbase or mesos on a cloud provider. Learn ansible, prometheus, go, python or loads of other things in your browser. You can show off your skills outside your job on github or bitbucket and contribute to loads of projects to build up a real, viewable CV.

There are companies out there that value their engineering staff. For starters, they're usually not calling them "IT staff." You should look for those companies. You should also look at the job you do. Is it worth what they pay you? If you ran the company, would you keep that position? If either answer is no, go find a company where both those answers are yes - and your career will be the better for it.

Comment Get better skills (Score 1) 482

I've been hearing about H1-B visa issues on slashdot since I joined and my uid is 5000. And quite honestly, I've never understood it. If you keep up your skills and progress beyond basic tech support or other low-level paper-pushing jobs this is never an issue.

In my experience, people with H1-B visas fill one of two scenarios: needs and costs.

The first is where a company needs more staff because they are always hiring. This would be like a Google or Facebook where they need smart, capable staff and can't find enough of them. Even with H1-Bs they can't. So there's no threat to "native" workers.

The second is to replace low-skilled staff with cheaper workers. And yeah, I get that sucks. But the solution is to learn more skills so you can get the first type of job.

I'm a 45 year old developer. I've learned more programming languages post-college than I learned in college. I've taken courses on managing development teams. I've read tons of books on various aspects of tech. I have skills that are useful and hard to find.

That's the answer - and it's actually part of the point Hillary Clinton was making.

Comment Or you could use paper cups instead (Score 4, Interesting) 299

It might surprise some hardcore environmentalists that using paper cups, or just using more paper on anything else, might be more environment friendly than you might imagine. (The following facts might be considered as flamebait again but please read on with patient before you mod.)

Papers are not made from cutting wood in rain forest anymore (some furniture, on the other hand, still are). 95% of the raw materials in paper are coming from trees, and these trees are carefully planned to grow and harvest. Various "Tree Funds" were raised every 10-15 years for raising money in building such tree farms.

Unfortunately, these "Tree Funds" are very sensitive to market. When there are less demand in papers, these funds would diminish, and in turn less tree farms would be built. Less tree farms, less trees, less oxygen-producers, more carbon dioxide, more severe the green house effect and so forth.

Encouraging paper-saving would probably lead to more green house gases. The irony...

Comment Dutch Sandwich and Bermuda Black Hole (Score 1) 263

Why would EU want multinational giants like Google to have full disclosure of their tax evasion strategies when they have absolutely no intention to hide it? Their tax evasion strategies are commonly known as "Double Irish, Dutch Sandwich", which could easily be found in modern textbooks.

Ultimately the corporate taxes are waived in Bermuda (aka. Bermuda Black Hole), I wondered how EU was supposed to regulate it?

Comment Some states ban sales of solar power (Score 0, Flamebait) 292

Contrary to the believes of most posts above, solar energy actually works, and it works to an extend that households could sell the excessive power back to the energy companies. Traditional energy companies thus lobby for banning of sales of power by individual households or corporations. Florida, which is supposed to have plenty sunshine for solar powering, are one of the four states imposed such ban for protection of monopolization. Well, they used "inefficient energy production" in lobbying. Sadly, Federal Government backed it, because solar panels were mostly made by China, and promotion of the use of solar panels would probably deepen the trade deficits.

Traditional energy companies ruled that renewable energy companies must not survive in US. You have better chance in other countries. RIP.

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