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Comment Re:Verizon is going to get in trouble (Score 2) 135

Do you have your clothes dryer vent professionally cleaned every six months?

Did you know that, in the US alone, 2,900 home clothes dryer fires are reported each year and cause an estimated 5 deaths, 100 injuries, and $35 million in property loss?

By comparison, only 96 credible reports of Note 7 fires exist, causing 13 burns and damaging property 47 times, making the known-defective Note 7 roughly 30 times safer than a non-defective clothes dryer.

Are you willing to accept the responsibility in case your clothes dryer results in injuries and death to others? Just to avoid a MINOR inconvenience?

Comment Re:Ironic (Score 1) 165

If you can do a thing and legally get away with it because the legal system in that country is corrupt or broken, then it by definition is "perfectly acceptable".

"That country", in this case, is the US. Knowingly filing a frivolous police report in the US is not "perfectly acceptable" or something you just "get away with".


why should I take the word of some random person on the internet over that of the actual legal authorities in a place?

You shouldn't! Of course, on the flip-side of that, no doubt you can provide an on-the-record statement by the "actual legal authorities" of Las Vegas saying they consider wasting their time as a PR stunt just peachy-keen?

Comment Re:Hackers? (Score -1, Offtopic) 86

Majority of voters? You mean "DWS, Podesta, and other key DNC officials", surely?

The majority of voters just do what the guy with the nicest hair tells them.
The DNC, blatantly conspired to keep a dirty Jew off the ticket, and cost themselves an election that was theirs to throw away in a year when it really mattered.

One is just ignorant. The other is fucking evil and proud of it.

Comment Re:In Short (Score 1) 101

In U.S. law, only someone who is involved in the conflict may ask the courts to resolve the matter in a particular way.

In U.S. law, "no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things".

But please, keep trying to suck Officer Friendly's cock; he'll no doubt cut you some slack when he eventually gets around to figuring out what (not "if") crime you're guilty of.

Comment Re:I'm not worried (Score 1) 370

How do these people participate in a free market without setting up corporations?

Have you ever bought anything from a farmers' market? Have you ever hired a plumber d/b/a himself rather than working for Plumbers-R-Us? Have you ever bought a used car directly from a private seller? Do you have a 401k/403b/457/TSP/IRA? Have you ever used eBay? Have you ever traded your labor for a paycheck (aka "worked") without hiding behind an intermediate shell-corp?

The freeness of a market has nothing to do with the corporeality of the entities participating in that market; and in fact, the Founding Fathers had quite the standing disagreement about whether or not to allow incorporation in the first place, despite all believing pretty strongly in the importance of a free market.

Comment Re:More time for TV (Score 1) 234

If you like doing off-the-clock work, great. Not sure what that has to do with labor laws, tho.

In the US, if you are hourly, you cannot legally work "off the clock". Ever. Period. Not even answering emails on a work-issued phone. Those saying they do that would get their employer completely screwed if they complained to the DoL.

Now, if you're salaried... "Off the clock" doesn't really exist, so feel free to act like a slave... But fuck you if you think I'm responding to your "look at what a good little slave I am, working at 2am on a Saturday!" emails before Monday at 8am.

Comment Re:Please, No Exponential Algorithms! (Score 1) 218

Don't worry about premature optimization.

You clearly have never worked with an old-school Assembly programmer. Yes, there are people who will drop an O(n^3) algorithm in without even realizing what they've done, and those people need to take up an exciting career in fast food preparation. But at the other extreme, there are also people who will count every clock cycle and hand-unroll the inner loop to minimize the constant factor of a rarely-used O(log n) operation.

Avoiding both of those is optimal in terms of the use of human time, and it really doesn't matter how many machines your code runs on. Sure, saving 32 milliseconds per user per day adds up to ten years of CPU time across a billion machines - So what? Your users don't notice that, but your development costs most certainly do.

FWIW, I would accuse myself (as an "old-school Assembly programmer") of needing to resist the urge to optimize, optimize, optimize everything - All too tempting, spending just a few more hours (that turns into a week or two) tightening up that one obviously-inefficient section of code; when in reality no one but me will ever know about it.

Comment Loophole? (Score 1) 131

Wait - So if FL doesn't require any special permits or licenses for "driverless" cars, how exactly do they define "driverless"?

This seems like a loophole big enough for people who've had their licenses revoked to drive a Scania R 450 through - Just stick a computer between yourself and the car's controls, and bam, no need to worry about that pesky "license" thing.

Hell, some people might do that just for kicks - I've always wondered why we can't just have a simple joystick to control our cars... Well, in FL, we apparently can!

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