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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 5 declined, 5 accepted (10 total, 50.00% accepted)

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Submission + - HP to open source WebOS (wired.com)

jcombel writes: The article quotes new CEO Meg Whitman, "“WebOS is the only platform designed from the ground up to be mobile, cloud-connected and scalable,” said Meg Whitman, the newly crowned president of HP. “By contributing this innovation, HP unleashes the creativity of the open source community to advance a new generation of applications and devices.”

The Wired writer, on the other hand, calls this the death of WebOS — as if it couldn't possibly go anywhere in the hands of the FOSS community.

Submission + - Two New Fed GPS Trackers Found on SUV (wired.com) 1

jcombel writes: As the Supreme Court gets ready to hear oral arguments in a case Tuesday that could determine if authorities can track U.S. citizens with GPS vehicle trackers without a warrant, a young man in California has come forward to Wired to reveal that he found not one but two different devices on his vehicle recently.
Patents

Submission + - VIA Sues Apple for Patent Infringement (bloomberg.com)

jcombel writes: The patent wars raged on today with chipmaker VIA Technologies filing suit against Apple for infringing on its patents with its iDevices.

VIA Technologies Inc., a Taiwanese semiconductor manufacturer, filed suit on Wednesday with the U.S. District Court in Wilmington, Del. VIA’s complaint has to do with three U.S. patents allegedly infringed upon by Apple’s microprocessors, which include the in-house designed A4 and A5 that power the iPhone 4, iPod touch and iPad.

That seems to cast a fairly wide net, but since the core tech behind products made by VIA and Apple are based on completely different architecture, it could be that its issues are mainly to do with the modifications Apple has made to the basic ARM design in order to makes its A-series processors more power efficient.

Intel

Submission + - Microsoft: No Windows 8 ARM support for x86 apps (theregister.co.uk)

jcombel writes: It turns out Microsoft's app compatibility will be limited to one architecture or another. Yes, your Windows 8 will run you your ARM tablet, but your x86 Office 2003 will not.

In his explanation, Steven Sinofsky reasoned, “If we allow the world of x86 application support like that, or based on what we call desktop apps in our start yesterday, then there are real challenges in some of the value proposition for system on a chip," he said. "You know, will battery life be as good, for example? Well, those applications aren't written to be really great in the face of limited battery constraints, which is a value proposition of the Metro style apps.”

Games

Submission + - Sony confirms PS Vita battery life (expertreviews.co.uk)

jcombel writes: Sony has let slip a few more details regarding its upcoming PlayStation Portable successor the PlayStation Vita, and it's not good news for anyone who would like to use the device away from the home: it's going to have a mere five hour battery life.

Also mentioned is a new flavor of Sony MemoryStick that will cost double for the same capacity. Expensive, non-mobile, 'portable' gaming platform?

Submission + - 50 year-old crocodile captured in Phillipines (guardian.co.uk)

jcombel writes: A one-tonne crocodile which may be the biggest ever caught alive has been captured in the Philippines, and officials say they are now hunting for an even bigger beast.

Villagers and veteran hunters ensnared a 6.1-metre (20ft) saltwater crocodile over the weekend after a three-week hunt in Bunawan township in Agusan del Sur province, where terrified villagers have reported at least one deadly attack.

Submission + - The First Plastic Computer Processor (technologyreview.com)

jcombel writes: Lot of talk lately about developing replacements for silicon; how about a nearly-transparent film of plastic, woven into clothing or affixed directly to equipment? From the article, 'Silicon may underpin the computers that surround us, but the rigid inflexibility of the semiconductor means it cannot reach everywhere. The first computer processor and memory chips made out of plastic semiconductors suggest that, someday, nowhere will be out of bounds for computer power.'

Submission + - Why don’t journalists link to primary source (guardian.co.uk) 1

jcombel writes: Too often lately I look at the Slashdot blurb, then read then article, then groan. The article submitted was a copy/pasta of another article, which was itself a copy/pasta of a press release. It often takes two or three clicks to get to the original information, or maybe even a web search on the topic because none of the articles actually linked the study. With enough digging, you find why the source was omitted: it is inconvenient for one reason or another, maybe a policy agenda, or maybe just the truth didn't make as sensational a headline.

Ben Goldacre (if there was a thing called a slashdot favorite, he'd be it) writes about how this is getting out of hand, and proposes a mindset for discerning facts on the internet: "I've detected myself using a new rule of thumb: if you don't link to primary sources, I just don't trust you."

Facebook

Submission + - Google challenges Facebook over user address books (reuters.com)

jcombel writes: When you sign in to Facebook, you had the option of importing your email contacts, to "friend" them all on the social network. Importing the other way — easily copying your Facebook contacts to Gmail — required jumping through considerable copy/paste hoops or third-party scripts. Google said enough is enough, and they're no longer helping sites that don't allow two-way contact merging. The stated intention is standing their ground to budge other sites into allowing users have control of where their data goes — but will this just lead to more sites putting up "data walls"?

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