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Comment Re:not happening. (Score 1) 279

...
It works, it's reliable, and is pretty resistant to any kind of interference. ...

But it's just not sexy :-)

Seriously, I live in Canada and during the last federal election campaign my head almost exploded when I saw that the Liberal party (now the governing party) was promising to seriously look at online voting if elected. Online voting - a problem-ridden solution in search of a problem.

Comment Canada should have done the same! (Score 1) 183

This is what Canada should have done rather than phasing out home delivery of mail in favour of not-so-super "super mailboxes".

For those not in the know "super mailboxes" are basically community mailboxes located somewhere in your neighbourhood. The not-so-super aspects of this is that they are subject to vandalism, theft, and arson (yes, arson). Additionally, some people feel it acceptable to drop their junk mail straight on the ground, rather than take it home for recycling. And, finally, for some folks (elderly, disabled) fetching mail by trekking out to a super-mailbox in the middle of a Canadian winter is a less than pleasant experience.

One can only assume that the sensible approach of cutting mail delivery from 5 to, say, 3 days a week was not taken so as not to upset the postal union (CUPW).

Comment Re:Hey US mind your own business (Score 1) 119

A quick example, the US forced Switzerland to automatically provide information on bank account but at the same is refusing to do the same.

Maybe they're not refusing, it's just that no Swiss citizens have decided that when depositing money in a highly secure private bank account, why screw around with the United States when you could just walk across the street. You know, to a Swiss bank...

The US has forced (via threat of financial sanctions) FATCA (Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act) on numerous countries in order to obtain financial account information on US citizens. Meanwhile the US has so far refused to reciprocate in any meaningful way. The result is that for non-US citizens, the US is the best tax haven around (google "Delaware Nevada Wyoming tax havens").

Meanwhile the US also refuses to sign up for the OECD CRS (Common Reporting Standard).

So, the other guy is totally correct - the US is indeed being monumentally hypocritical when it comes to offshore tax evasion.

Comment Re:Sad truth: No Jail Time or RICO confiscation (Score 1) 110

In the case of Canada, it can be seen by even a layperson that the particular use of an Isle of Man tax haven was tax evasion with just enough lipstick on it to be able to later claim, in an emergency, 'gosh, I didn't realize that was a pig I was kissing'. Look up the details of it and tell me how any reasonable person could think what was being done was legal tax avoidance. !

Comment Re:Sad truth: No Jail Time or RICO confiscation (Score 1) 110

In the case of Canada, it can be seen by even a layperson that the particular use of an Isle of Man tax haven was tax evasion with just enough lipstick on it to be able to later claim, in an emergency, 'gosh, I didn't realize that was a pig I was kissing'. Look up the details of it and tell me how any reasonable person could think what was being done was legal tax avoidance.

Comment Re:FWD.us? (Score 1) 484

What bullshit. "Protectionist" my ass.

The U.S. is the ONLY economy in the world where government *doesn't* work to make sure that their own citizens are first in line for jobs. Just try to emigrate to the U.K. Try to emigrate to Canada.

...

Not entirely sure what point is trying to be made with the reference to emigrating to Canada, but as a FYI, on a per-capita basis Canada takes in *far* more immigrants than any other country in the world.

Canada

Submission + - Copyright lawsuits apparently coming to Canada (theglobeandmail.com)

jbr439 writes: Voltage Pictures, a L.A. movie studio known for numerous forgettable motion pictures, is seeking, via court order, customer information on 2,000 IP addresses used by customers of Canadian ISP TekSavvy. The expectation is that if this information is obtained, lawsuits will be soon be following. The court date is set for Dec 17.
TekSavvy was possibly chosen as the target of this action due to it being one of the smaller ISPs in Canada.

This is likely a result of Canada bringing in new copyright laws in early November. Among other things, under the new laws statutory damages for non-commercial infringing are limited to $5,000.

Additional information on this issue can be obtained at Michael Geist's excellent site: http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/6718/125/
                                                                                                       

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