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Comment Re:Well.. (Score 5, Interesting) 197

Agreed. This is a sad first turn -- Trump's FCC may as well have sent a letter to the major ISPs saying "Hunting season on American Internet consumers is open! No tag limit!"

I was very skeptical when Wheeler was appointed to chair the FCC, given his corporate background, but he ended up being one of the most consumer-focused and practically progressive people in Obama's government.

And now? May as well say goodbye to net neutrality.

Comment Alexa Rankings (Score 2) 85

found that the number of websites listed in Alexa's top one million websites that have adopted to HTTPS has more than doubled

Why do people still use Alexa? There can't be more than a tiny handful of people who still use their crappy browser toolbar and that measuring metric has always had significant selection bias. Do they have a newer, better data source, or is there just nothing better so people fall back to a name that's familiar?

It would be nice if the major ISPs would aggregate and share all that data they save for the NSA anyway with some nonprofit org for this kind of thing.

Earth

First Human-Pig 'Chimera' Created in Milestone Study (theguardian.com) 158

Scientists have created a human-pig hybrid in a milestone study that raises the prospect of being able to grow human organs inside animals for use in transplants. From a report: It marks the first time that embryos combining two large, distantly-related species have been produced. The creation of this so-called chimera -- named after the cross-species beast of Greek mythology -- has been hailed as a significant first step towards generating human hearts, livers and kidneys from scratch. Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, who led the work on the part-pig, part-human embryos at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California, said: "The ultimate goal is to grow functional and transplantable tissue or organs, but we are far away from that. This is an important first step." The study has reignited ethical concerns that have threatened to overshadow the field's clinical promise. The work inevitably raises the spectre of intelligent animals with humanised brains and also the potential for bizarre hybrid creatures to be accidentally released into the wild. The US National Institutes of Health (NIH) placed a moratorium on funding for the controversial experiments last year while these risks were considered.

Comment Re:Wow (Score 1) 185

wouldn't shit the bed when they tried to parse a URI like moz://a in a chunk of text.

If an application blows up when it encounters :// in free-form text, I have no sympathy and neither should Mozilla. Too many things try to be cute with minimal and poorly-defined markup these days and any pushback is welcome.

Comment Re:No headphone jack ... (Score 4, Insightful) 205

Must be a shitty ploy, my brand new HTC bolt came with wired headphones.

Pushing more expensive headphones might be a bonus short-term side effect, but the real victory here is the potential of closing the analog hole for mobile devices. I fully expect someone to introduce "end to end" DRM within a year or two which will require an authenticated and encrypted connection from the source (file or stream) through the mobile processor, to the headphones. Non-compliant headphones won't be able to authenticate with the host device and therefore won't be usable with certain DRM'd media.

Don't be surprised when Apple shows more "courage" and removes the analog audio connectors from their next lineup of desktops and laptops (if they haven't already). The desktop / laptop market will swiftly follow once people accept it on mobile.

Take a look at HDCP for an example of how this has already been done elsewhere.

Comment Re: Unlimited? (Score 2) 196

What the hell does net neutrality have to do with the data limits on cellphone plans?

Moving away from unlimited and into more expensive and limited plans pushes people towards provider-sanctioned services for which the bandwidth does not count towards your monthly usage. This goes against network neutrality, even if the topic is bandwidth usage instead of transfer speed.

What the hell does Trump's winning the US Presidential election have to do with cellphone data plans?

Trump is an opponent of net neutrality.

Comment Re:Who cares? (Score 1) 238

Not to mention obscene contrast ratios (which is implied by your post, I guess) -- some claim 1,000,000:1, others seem to claim infinite.

Contrast ratios get silly and mostly pointless when you have a black that is fully non-emissive. It's the same as dividing by zero -- hence the claim for an infinite ratio.

With OLED panels, the important metrics will be brightness and color gamut.

HP

HP Made a Laptop Slightly Thicker To Add 3 Hours of Battery Life (theverge.com) 167

When a technology company like Apple releases a new product, chances are it's going to be thinner than its predecessor -- even if may be slightly worse off for it. HP is taking a different approach with its new 15.6-inch Spectre x360 laptop, which was recently announced at CES. The machine is slightly thicker than its predecessor, and HP claims it features three hours of additional battery life. The Verge reports: The difference between the new x360 and the old x360, in terms of thickness, is minimal, from 15.9mm to 17.8mm. (For reference, the 2015 MacBook Pro was 18mm thick.) It's an increase of 1.9mm for the Spectre, but HP says it's now including a battery that's 23 percent larger in exchange. At the same time, the laptop is also getting narrower, with its body shrinking from 14.8 inches wide to 14 inches wide. Unfortunately, the claimed three hours of additional battery life aren't meant to make this laptop into some long-lasting wonder -- they're really just meant to normalize its battery life. HP will only be selling the 15.6-inch x360 with a 4K display this year, and that requires a lot more power. By increasing the laptop's battery capacity, HP is able to push the machine's battery life from the 9.5 hours it estimated for the 4K version of its 2016 model to about 12 hours and 45 minutes for this model. So it is adding three hours of battery life, but in doing so, it's merely matching the battery life of last year's 1080p model. The x360 is also being updated to include Intel's Kaby Lake processors. It includes options that max out at an i7 processor, 16GB of RAM, a 1TB SSD, and Nvidia GeForce 940MX graphics. It's supposed to be released February 26th, with pricing starting at $1,278 for an entry-level model.

Comment No. It didn't "predict" anything. (Score 0, Troll) 186

It reacted when there were "obvious" signs of trouble, and it didn't "predict" anything. The 2nd car in front was slowing fast enough that the Tesla would have started to brake on its own -- just as happened here. Would a person have noticed and reacted in the same way? Maybe; probably not. What I'm saying here isn't dismissing what the Tesla did...but the Tesla also didn't "predict" anything or see into the future; it reacted to inputs that were already present, and a good and attentive human driver might have done the same thing. Once perfected, self-driving cars and accident avoidance technology will make the roads safer â" but let's not make them seem magical, because they aren't.

Comment Re:Why they are slow? (Score 1, Informative) 766

You're wrong.

Actually, you are.

Even if they've already got the library disk-cached, it's actually slower to access the disk cache, and check the cache age, and verify that there isn't a newer library version (did you know the browser often goes round-trip just to check?) than it does to simply serve the library in-line.

It depends on cache control headers originally sent by the CDN, but this is usually completely false. Google can set an Expires header a year in the future and the browser will NOT do a round trip to check. That only happens if the cache control is set to must-revalidate, and few good script CDNs will do that. Aside from that, disk will always be faster than network.

Benchmark it yourself. Serve 100KB of javascript in-line, in the middle of your html file. Compare that to a separate src= js file.

Modern browsers handle inline script very differently than those pulled in via an external file, so that confounds things somewhat. But even then, the only time it matters is the first time the user goes to any page with the jQuery (or whatever) that gets loaded from Google's CDN. After that it doesn't have to transfer it until the cache expires, so it's always going to be faster than putting it inline. Besides, putting libraries inline is 100% wrong, even if you host it yourself, because it makes client caching impossible.

Comment There is, and will be, no "Muslim registry" (Score 1, Informative) 600

They are protesting something that will never be created, because when the rhetoric was translated into reality, it was a proposal to reestablish the National Security Entry-Exit Registration System (NSEERS)[1], which was in force through half of President Obama's presidency, and which tracks certain individuals who enter the United States based on country/region of origin and other factors. Useless publicity stunt with commensurate absolutely abysmal coverage by The Intercept.

See also:

8 U.S. Code  1182 - Inadmissible aliens[2]

"Suspension of entry or imposition of restrictions by President:

Whenever the President finds that the entry of any aliens or of any class of aliens into the United States would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, he may by proclamation, and for such period as he shall deem necessary, suspend the entry of all aliens or any class of aliens as immigrants or nonimmigrants, or impose on the entry of aliens any restrictions he may deem to be appropriate."

Flashback:

"The Secretary of State and the Attorney General will invalidate all visas issued to Iranian citizens for future entry into the United States, effective today. We will not reissue visas, nor will we issue new visas, except for compelling and proven humanitarian reasons or where the national interest of our own country requires. This directive will be interpreted very strictly."[3] -- President Jimmy Carter, April 7, 1980

[1] https://www.ice.gov/nseers
[2] https://www.law.cornell.edu/us...
[3] http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu...

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