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Comment Re:Just starting now? (Score 5, Interesting) 373

Part of the problem is that airlines are cramming more seats into each plane. However the real limiting capacity for carrying people/cargo is not # of seats, its weight. Too heavy, then the plane needs extra runway to reach a higher speed just to get off the ground. Even if it does get off the ground, it may not stay that way for long if weight limits are exceeded.

Then there's the fact that we have more obese travelers. So yeah, not surprised its becoming more of a problem. And technically, weight and balance calculations are required before each flight.

Comment Re:When exactly (Score 2) 241

Neil noticed early on that when he gave long winded answers to interview questions, it would be highly edited to fit whatever show it was for. So he started practicing giving short and succinct answers to specific topics. Once he started doing that, his complete answer would make it to the final product, with minimal editing needed.

Comment Re:About time common sense prevailed! (Score 1) 292

>As a pilot, takeoff is not at all a sensitive time of flight

Actually, takeoff is a critical part of the flight. If something goes wrong, you're low, slow, and the runway is *behind* you. However if you're already in the pattern (and at pattern alt) you could have an engine failure anywhere on the downwind leg and still make it back around to the runway.

The real question is whether or not 300 or so devices turned on affect the planes navigation systems. I seem to remember a study done a while back indicating the potential for problems (if any) was due more to the screens used by smart phones/ebook readers/etc, than wireless or anything else.

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"The eleventh commandment was `Thou Shalt Compute' or `Thou Shalt Not Compute' -- I forget which." -- Epigrams in Programming, ACM SIGPLAN Sept. 1982