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Comment Re:Congratulations (Score 1) 235

They've always been very civil to me... even Theo. Ted Unangst has chewed me out a few times over stupid stuff, but I don't take it personally. Their man pages are the best. They are online too.
Security

Submission + - Dealing With Sensitive Data

imus writes: Just wondering how most IT shops secure sensitive data (customer records). Most centrally managed databases seem to be monitored and maintained very well and IT workers know when they are tampered with or when unauthorized access occurs. But what about employees who do legitimate selects from these databases and then load CSV files and other text files onto their laptops and PDAs? How are companies dealing with situations where the database is relatively secure, but end-use devices contain bits and pieces of sensitive business data, and sometimes whole segments? Does anyone use sensitive data discovery software such as Find_SSNs or Senf or other tools? Once found, how do you deal with it? Do you force encryption, delete it or prevent extracts?
Security

Submission + - Is a zeroed hard drive really secure?

imus writes: A challenge to confirm whether or not a professional data recovery firm or any individual(s) or organization(s) can recover data from a hard drive that has been overwritten with zeros once. We used the 32 year-old Unix dd command using /dev/zero as input to overwrite the drive... What do you guys think, can the challenge be won?
Security

Submission + - The Great Zero Challenge

An anonymous reader writes: The Great Zero Challenge — "It is noble and just to dispel myths, falsehoods and untruths." A challenge to confirm whether or not a professional data recovery firm or any individual(s) or organization(s) can recover data from a hard drive that has been overwritten with zeros once. We used the 32 year-old Unix dd command using /dev/zero as input to overwrite the drive. Three data recover companies were contacted. All three are listed on this page. Two companies declined to review the drive immediately upon hearing the phrase 'dd', the third declined to review the drive after we spoke to second level phone support and they asked if the dd command had actually completed (good question).

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