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Submission + - The Spy at Harriton High (blogspot.com) 2

An anonymous reader writes: stryde.hax delivers a detailed look into the software involved in the alleged spying incident in PA. Among the findings are a detailed interview with a high school network tech describing the operation of the spyware, forum postings by school personnel, and a reverse engineering effort of the spyware client and server. Will the school's claim that the capability was never used hold up to this new flood of primary evidence?
Portables

Submission + - First Look at Palm's New Linux-Based Smartphone (popsci.com)

Eater writes: At CES today, Palm announced their new Pre smartphone, the first device to use their innovative Linux-based "WebOS". Instead of choosing an application from a menu or launcher, the OS responds to typed input, selecting the most likely application based on whether you're typing a contact name, phone number, email address, search keyword, date, and so forth. Sounds intriguing, but we'll see how it stacks up.
Data Storage

Submission + - SanDisk To Sell 120GB SSD for $250 (computerworld.com)

Lucas123 writes: "SanDisk announced at CES that it's launching a third generation of its 2.5-in solid state disk drives, and it's positioning the technology as a replacement for aging hardware in corporations. While users may not be ready to rip and replace thousands of HDDs — copy over data and reinstall the OS — in order to extend the life of laptops, the drives seem to mark a tipping point in the pricing of flash drives, where the average joe can now afford the technology. The new notebook drives come in 60, 120 and 250GB capacities, and offer very respectable sustained read write rates of 200MB/sec and 140MB/sec, respectively. SanDisk also announced new 1.8-in SSDs for netbooks with 8GB, 16GB, 32GB and 64GB capacities."

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