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Comment Re:Why not just charge for FTTP? (Score 2) 107

The problem is that it depends hugely on where it is and how many other people have it.

Citywide our city is doing it for a little more than $2k/home. The parts of town on poles will be cheap and it'll cost more in other places where they need to trench, but because the penetration is so high, the cost is low. It also helps that our city run their own power and water so have a lot of existing poles, trenches, boxes and easements that they can leverage.

We ended up installing it at work in another city and it "cost" $23k to run fiber about 1500'. We ended up not actually paying that and I suspect that was marked up some, but it probably wasn't unreasonable for that kind of underground trench distance.

I'd probably pay $2k to get it at my house, but I'd have a hard time with $23k. And that's only for a 1500' run, it could easily be more than that. I've heard of people with homes in the mountains spending upwards of $200k to get power run to their properties.

Comment Re:Did its job in Nashville (Score 1) 107

Same in longmont, CO.

I don't have municipal fiber yet, but comcast are offering 300/30 cable for $50/mo and 2000/2000 fiber for $299/mo (and that's actually available). CenturyLink are supposed to be rolling out fiber and I see the trucks but don't know anyone that has it yet. Most likely i'll have the choice of 3 different fiber providers sometime this year (and apparently gigabit cable too).

Comment Re:EPB has 10Gb Fiber... Google is making excuses (Score 1) 107

How are the doing every run as dedicated at that price?

We're a bit behind you in longmont CO, but I was pretty sure that Chattanooga was using GPON for their 1gig service which is very much a shared bandwidth service (sharing 2.44Gbps down and 1.244 Gbps up iirc between either 16, 32 or 64 homes). Leads nicely to the 10g service since they can do XGPON2 over the same shared fiber using a different frequency.

Comment Re:East Palo Alto has always been troubled (Score 1) 504

I do think that cities have a moral obligation to ensure that their local employees are paid enough that they can reasonably live in the city.

So many of the issues with police would be better if cities were generally policed by police who lived there. I grew up knowing where most of my school teachers lived because i walked by their houses. A teacher in Palo Alto should be able to afford a condo there.

Comment Re:The answer is no, this is pointless (Score 1) 230

Virtually all of mine is zwave. It connects through a bridge to the internet and so while you could compromise the bridge you'd never really compromise the device. The light switch lacks wifi, lacks any concept of an IP address and I struggle to see any viable exploit against that.

The idea of buying a mismatch of nonstandard wifi bulbs from different suppliers just sounds like a nightmare.

Comment Re:Ideally a manifest/profile from IoT makers... (Score 3, Interesting) 230

But how would that work for devices that aren't tied to a specific service? I have some neat little wifi devices that show up in spotify and let me stream to various speakers around the house. If i cut them off from the internet then they simply don't work. I'd have to manually identify every IP that spotify uses and there seem to be a lot of them. In the end I watched them, identified two chinese IPs that they do reach out to and simply blocked those two. In theory that should stop them pulling in new firmware which seems like the most likely way they'd be infected. (However I haven't been able to determine if it uses an DNS lookup to find them and if so then that means someone hacking the chinese manufacturer could easily route the dns to another server).

The other thing that's really missing here is that this isn't really limited to iot devices. I'm sure in a year or two they'll be as secure as a typical windows machine and then the exploits will swing back that direction. Consumers that care about keeping their devices safe will do so, and those that don't give a fuck will see a slight improvement as time goes by.

Comment Re:some rules (Score 5, Insightful) 230

I've corralled mine into a dhcp space, but it might be safer just to set up a whole separate wifi network for them, would make it easier to monitor.

Still it's trickier for things like the chromecast or airplay-type devices, because they both interact with phones and laptops on the local network and need to connect directly to streaming sources on the internet.

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