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Comment Re: Intentionally Bricked (Score 1) 432

Those are merely the most convenient method to keep the car you own running.

You're free to build a wood gassification rig and modify the engine to run on that. You're free to modify it to run on high-proof alcohol and refine your own. In theory, you could strike oil on your own property and refine it in small scale to make your own gasoline. All options inconvenient and expensive, but possibly legal with certain safety and environmental restrictions to contend with.

You're probably not free (due to DMCA reverse engineering restrictions) to modify your Revolv to build your own version of their server architecture.

Let's agree to keep it simple.

Best Answer: Diesel. Runs on almost any fuel oil including vegetable oil, although petroleum-based fuel oils are easy to refine; it's definitely DIY-able if need be.

Next Best Answer: Alcohol would be the gasoline-powered alternative fuel, requires a doubling of the fuel:air ratio but that's it.

No need to go any more exotic than the above two, which cover ... let's see here ... oh, yeah, there it is .... ALL of the petroleum powered vehicles on the planet.

Comment Not Needed or Helpful (Score 1) 566

The physical size of a connector is related to whether it needs to be handled by human hands, and if so, whether a locking mechanism is part of the connector, which also must be handled by human hands. Beyond that, it's the physical size of the necessary cable that forms the final parameter.

The Ethernet Connector could be made slightly smaller and satisfy the above, but not by much. There is no need for change when it's for the sake of change. So, the current RJ-45 is perfectly adequate and need not be further reduced in size.

A possibility would be to increase the density of the interface; ie 10 Ethernet lines per connector. In that case, you could justify a newer connector but it would still operate alongside the single line RJ-45 in many cases, rather than replace it.

Comment Re: Yes (Score 1) 195

For clarity, I should have added to my post (quoted below) that I do use a GPS today for what I formerly used paper maps and associated tools (compass, straightedge, marker) on land and water; plus while piloting VFR aircraft we are now or were until recently (depending on the jurisdiction) required to carry paper maps and cannot legally rely on a GPS, although it is (now) legal to mount one in the cockpit (it was prohibited for a long time after GPS units became affordable; thus only "portable" [handheld] GPS's were sold with aviation-specific software).

A GPS is easier than paper maps in most ways, but maps still have the advantage when it comes to displaying the area you find yourself in, which in itself is an aid to navigation.

As someone who used paper maps and compasses daily in the wilderness for more than a decade, I can assure you they most definitely tell you where you are, as well as provide all the information you need to determine all the features a GPS offers (such as how to get where you want to go from where you are), except the exact time of day.

Well, OK, the clued-in would also have a straight edge and a pencil or pen. Yes, you can get ones that write on a wet paper map. Which you won't need, since you were clued in enough to paint your paper maps with Thompson's Water Seal, which waterproofs them for a full season in the elements in the really worn parts (the seams you fold the map at) and for years in the least worn parts (the map portion not on a folded seam) before you need to re-apply it, and readily takes pencil and pen marks.

What you meant to say, perhaps, is a GPS can display a map to someone who has no clue how to actually use a map, and as a bonus, tell them where they are.

Comment Re: Yes (Score 1) 195

As someone who used paper maps and compasses daily in the wilderness for more than a decade, I can assure you they most definitely tell you where you are, as well as provide all the information you need to determine all the features a GPS offers (such as how to get where you want to go from where you are), except the exact time of day.

Well, OK, the clued-in would also have a straight edge and a pencil or pen. Yes, you can get ones that write on a wet paper map. Which you won't need, since you were clued in enough to paint your paper maps with Thompson's Water Seal, which waterproofs them for a full season in the elements in the really worn parts (the seams you fold the map at) and for years in the least worn parts (the map portion not on a folded seam) before you need to re-apply it, and readily takes pencil and pen marks.

What you meant to say, perhaps, is a GPS can display a map to someone who has no clue how to actually use a map, and as a bonus, tell them where they are.

Comment Non-GMO Vegetable Oils less healthy than GMO (Score 2) 740

One of the healthiest vegetable oils, Canola Oil, is a product of genetic modification to remove a potential toxin, making it safe for humans to consume. Most of the characteristics were obtained by "conventional" genetic modification, similar to that used to create, for example, a seedless fruit variety.

However since Monsanto introduced the Gene-Spliced variety in the late 1990's, ("Roundup Ready Canola") that form has come to dominate the available crops in Canada and the USA. Also, the Monsanto variety has found it's way into the storage lots of the non-licensed seed stock. The result is the GMO Canola is virtually the only form available today in food grade Canola Oil (although it is worth noting that at least 87% is by grower's choice of the Monsanto seed, not seed stock contamination).

To avoid the GMO variety is to abandon the use of Canola altogether.

Canola pushes both all the "Heart Smart" buttons, and all the "GMO/non-GMO" buttons.

Because food manufacturers have largely embraced Canola as an input in processed foods, essentially everything from all the middle aisles in a North American supermarket contains GMO Canola. In other words, almost all the products in the supermarket in Vermont will have to be labeled as containing GMO ingredients.

The alternative is to use a less healthy vegetable oil, and that might include Hydrogenated varieties containing unhealthy Trans Fats, and earn the right to apply the NON-GMO label.

Comment A Solid, Recoverable Text String (Score 1) 167

In order to avoid the possibility of a string of text being unrecoverable in the future due to some minor change in the text you used versus the available copies (a potential issue with printed or online versions of even classic texts such as The Odyssey, Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliette, etc), use a specific version of the Bible. For example the King James Version of a Psalm; that text will always be the same, character for character, if you use a specific version (interpretation and language translation) of the Bible. There are other texts that could also be used, including similar non-Christian examples. The presence of a religious book has many advantages, including the likelihood that access to it will be made available under many circumstances, including imprisonment by hostile agents. It is also "normal" to own or demand access to such texts.

Comment Re:Silly Pedantics (Score 1) 144

When I was in College, long before 1984 and the introduction of dates in desktop computers (in other words, I had no idea how anyone else did it), I numbered my lecture notes sequentially; the only way to do that is Month / Day / Year.

010612.02 would be Jan 6 2001 page 2

If you do it any other way, the date becomes your sequential indicator, which breaks it as far as determining which page was written first (the day of the month becomes the "first" page, so 1 Jan and 1 Feb follow each other, not 1 Jan followed by 2 Jan)

Comment Re:Modern electric boats.. (Score 2) 167

Modern diesel electric boats are very quiet and pose a challenge to those
that worry about such things.

True, but I'm guessing this is one of their Romeo class because atsvwhich are quite old. At any rate, she would have had to snorkel at some point which would give away her location. That she hasn't doesn't bode well for her or her crew.

Still, the PDRK aka North Korea have been building submarines, including perhaps the world's greatest program developing some very small "midget" variants, for a very, very long time. Some require the assistance of a mother ship but the largest of the midget type, the Samg-O Class (crew of 15), can operate independently.

It may also be a Sinpo Class (crew estimated of 30~50), the largest vessel and currently under active development to replace the Romeo Class. One has been observed under construction, others may be or have been built, and there is always the possibility of testing gone wrong.

Along with artillery, it's probably the military technology that the North Korean domestic industry is most proficient at. Although understood to be still inferior to the most modern western designs, that does not mean impotent, and the quiet running ability of Diesel-Electric subs is far from new and well understood; a 1970's era (40 years ago) level is sufficient for excellent results.

Comment Re:Kim Jong-un no doubt has a different story (Score 2) 167

Here's a picture with better perspective: https://www.rt.com/news/313141...
I suspect that protuberance with the windows is an enclosed bridge for conning the boat in cold weather, and not part of the pressure hull...diesel boats have to spend a lot of time running on the surface.

True, but another inherent property of Diesel-Electric submarines is they can operate submerged in extreme silence ... nuclear subs make a very small but detectible amount of noise at all times underwater ... which in this case might be a contributing factor in the overall uncertainty on both sides, as to whet, exactly, is going on (such as "is it simply damaged, or sunk, or what, exactly").

On another topic raised here (regarding the possibility that the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK, aka "North Korea") might blame the west for a sinking of the sub), there is the problem in that there is a fine line that must be drawn with regard to what sanctions and what incentives can be applied or offered to North Korea in order to moderate it's behaviour.

The problem is you can't go too hard because as a generally regarded rogue nation, you don't know how desperately they would hold onto power or (essentially) how many lives they would be willing to risk in order to maintain their control over the nation, and presumably, beyond. Blaming the USA, Korea (aka "South Korea") or Japan, etc is a near perfect pretence to escalation and who-knows-what aggressive action.

Comment Flaw in Economic Data (Score 3, Interesting) 729

Not exactly on topic, but the article, San Francisco's situation, and the conditions over time not just in cities, but states, nations, any identifiable economic area all point to what I consider a flaw in Economic reporting, that, to my amazement, many people fail to grasp.

The strength of any economy is reported as good, bad, improving, failing, the "world's best", the "world's worst" ... whatever rank you care to put on it ... based solely on the inflated value of the whole. City A is twice as prosperous as City B if the rents, wages, and prices are all twice City B's. No matter that an hour's wages buys the same square foot of land, the same block of cheese, the same latte, the same month of cable TV in both cities. City A is clearly "better" based on the Economic Data. If City A happens to be the most expensive city on the planet to work and live then it's defined as the wealthiest city on the planet, the most successful economy, the "place to be". Except as far as the day to day goes, it's just another, ordinary city.

[Somewhat more on topic] And then we get the issues regarding the transition from a City B economy to a City A economy ... there are people on fixed incomes or working in fields where the high wages aren't sustainable, who get stuck in the old economy when their fellow citizens are part of the new economy. They need each other ... someone has to build the homes, make the cheese, pour the latte ... but they can't afford each other. Similarly, if a visitor from City A comes to City B for a vacation, they seemingly have twice as much money to spend. But not at home, where twice as much buys just enough.

The economic realities are constantly shifting and the solution for SF residents of today is the same as it's always been ... wages and rents must go up, and some people must move to a City B (or even a City C) economy.

This is not really new ... time to roll the ubiquitous "is this news?" Slashdot comment. (Just kidding).

Comment Why is this news? (Score 1) 199

I'm sorry, but simply because some silicon and radio waves are involved, I don't see why that elevates this to newsworthy status. How about a headline from 1952 Korea, or 1944 Russia, or 1776 Virginia, where a poorly rendered paper map led to an ambush? Does it make the front page of a firearms journal of the day? I hope not.

Comment Count me amongst the trust-challenged (Score 1) 519

I get it that for some people, possibly even the vast majority of people, driving is drudgery and a burden.

I am not one of those people. I like to operate machinery (which is what driving is) and regardless of whether it's a classic or modern car, a sports car, a truck of almost any size (I don't operate tractor-trailer rigs, but 3-axle trucks, buses, light trucks are fair game) or Skid-Steer, a Loader, a Skidder, a 4-wheeler, a snowmobile, a boat of almost any size and power appropriate for fresh water use, light aircraft ... I'm sure there's something I'm missing from the list, but you get the idea I'm sure.

I don't like being a passenger in the first place; I almost never can sleep in a vehicle if someone else is driving, and that includes operators I trust. Obviously everyone feels the same as I when it comes to my driving skill, but I really am a good, courteous driver with thousands of hours operating vehicles other than road-going units, let alone on public highways. Zero at-fault accidents over 40 years driving on public roads, and probably dozens of examples where I've driven out of danger (versus freezing and driving right into it) with no injuries to anyone although I don't fear sacrificing the vehicle to save injury or death.

To me a self-driving car involves two areas of anxiety ... one, I don't trust the thing in the first place, and two, I'm being robbed of an activity I enjoy, which makes objection #1 moot, as things turn out.

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