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Comment Re:Couldn't Apple remove the Uber App as a respons (Score 1) 112

This is what should have happened when Cook met with him.

Actually, what should have happened is that Cook said: Look, not only did you break our app store rules, but you actively added code to keep is from detecting it. So your app is rejected, will be removed from everyone's phone, your developer account is closed, and you won't be allowed to create a new one.

Comment Re:They simply remember your UDID (Score 1) 112

Then there's IDFA, the Identifier for Advertisers, which the user can reset at any time via system settings, and which Apple will reject your app for if they catch you using it for anything other than ad-tracking.

And every time I submit an app, they threaten me personally with all kinds of nastiness if the app does anything with the IDFA that it shouldn't. I'd say they take this seriously. And I'd say that if I worked for Uber (which I probably wouldn't), I would _not_ be the one submitting apps.

Comment Re:They simply remember your UDID (Score 1) 112

And for many years now, long before 2005, Apple removed the ability to request the UDID of a phone, and didn't allow anyone on the app store who would try to identify your iPhone. So very clearly against the app store rules. And they knew that, so this wouldn't happen if the app was run near Cupertino, where presumably the testers were located who checked for this.

There is a new thing - a device specific identifier for a vendor. That is a unique code identifying your phone _to one application_. And this identifier is destroyed when you delete the application. So various vendors cannot identify whether you used two or three of their applications, because the vender identifiers are different, and they can't keep track of anything when you delete the app.

Comment Re:The only Reasonable Solution. (Score 1) 261

Imagine if they got the wrong sperm AND egg; which is entirely possible since it was in-vitro. Using this theory, the clinic could be held 100% financially responsible for the child until age 18!

I won't discuss whether this is right or wrong. But let's assume the clinic is a business. When you run a business, you want to get paid for your cost, plus some profit, and if there is a risk that you make mistakes, you add the probability of a mistake times the cost of a mistake. if there's a one in thousand chance of a million dollar mistake, then the cost goes up by $1,000. If people don't want to pay the $1,000, then they can't get the goods.

Comment Re: If he gets busted... (Score 2) 88

If a device can be bricked simply by hooking it up to a network, but buyer is too lazy or ignorant to check before buying, then buyer deserves what he gets. If buyer does his/her homework (and finds device is vulnerable), but buys the product anyway, then buyer deserves what he gets.

If a hacker causes massive damage, and is too lazy or ignorant to check that he or she might be jailed for causing that damage, then the hacker deserves what he gets. If the hacker does his/her homework (and finds there's the risk of jail time) and causes the damage anyway, then the hacker deserves what he gets.

Comment Re:I doubt it. (Score 1) 96

Anyone remember when Osborne Computers made the mistake of announcing computers before they were ready and pretty much tanked the company?

That wasn't what tanked them. What tanked them was that some idiot quite high up in the company discovered that they had huge numbers of motherboards for the old model lying around that were useless for the new model, and since he hated to waste the money that these motherboards cost, he ordered their manufacturing to turn them into computers. Which were unsellable, because the new model _was_ released.

Comment So JavaScript can emulate a 68000 in realtime? (Score 1) 66

To run this in a browser, there are two possibilities: The code for MacPaint for example runs on the server, or it runs on the client, with a JavaScript application emulating the original assembly code. I suppose it's possible; you probably have a microsecond on average to emulate each instruction.

Comment Re:It does "empower her" (Score 1) 166

The problem is that there are people who have no idea what some idiot f***ing bastard somewhere in the western world thinks is "funny". The idea that someone would tell you that you are suffering from a most likely lethal disease and consider that a "prank" wouldn't occur to them.

I'd suggest that the author of this app travels to Africa and tells these people in person what was so funny. If he doesn't come back alive, all the better.

Comment Re: permissions (Score 4, Insightful) 313

This. We have devs in the US and in South America, Eastern Europe, NA, and Asia. That doesn't stop my boss from merging bad codel

Where I work, when I do a pull request for the develop branch, I _must_ specify a reviewer and a tester, and until the reviewer has marked the code as fine, and the tester has marked it as fine, and a merge can be done with no conflicts, nobody can merge the code, including any boss. You can quite easily set this up in JIRA, for example.

Comment Re:A good chunk is (Score 3, Informative) 133

Stop guessing stuff. A "good chunk" is NOT on research and patents. Of the $2.8B loss, a bit over $2.6B went to drivers. Uber is trying to kill the competition by subsidizing their drivers with investors money.

People are obviously happy with Uber rides being cheap. And then they think that Uber has some excellent ideas and implements them well, and that's why they are cheap. WRONG. It's very easy to offer cheap rides if you just subsidize every ride with investors' money.

In China drivers were paid more than the customer paid at some point, so clever drivers let the whole family book rides, didn't drive anyone, paid back the ride fees, and kept the difference in their pocket. Free money, straight from the pocket of an investor into the pocket of a driver in China.

Comment Re:Google should modify response (Score 1) 606

So now McDonald's does it, but not to themselves but to every other indie restaurant and small chain.

Typical slash dotter who thinks the world is filled with braindead idiots. How long do you think would it take Google to figure out? And how long until Google sends every company affected a nice letter explaining how the were the victim of tortuous interference with their business, and how long until McDonald's would be convicted in court? BTW. Tortuous interference with business is a tort. Not just a civil case.

Comment Re:Just automate deduplication finger-printing (Score 1) 606

How would you do that, exactly? The sound it hears will be different for every household due to the type and placement of speakers in relation to the Google Home device, the room tone, any ambient sounds from the people watching the TV, etc., etc.

I was told that Google itself has TV adverts where someone says "OK Google" to demonstrate the product, and because Google doesn't want to achieve the same effect that Burger King wants, they filter out the commands coming from Google TV adverts. So they _can_ do this filtering.

Comment Re:"alternate vendors" (Score 1) 606

It would be impossible to argue that simply yelling "OK Google" constitutes "computer misuse" since intent can't be determined with that information alone. Your answer is incorrect.

A British judge has the power to determine intent, depending on the situation. How many people do you find in the street who call out "OK Google" ?

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