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Comment Re:Opposite (Score 5, Interesting) 546

Exactly.

I'm a gen X'er and I *know* I won't have a pension. Even if I retire, the government or the pension providers will default on me - either through inflation, or just because the damn pension providers will flatly announce they just don't have anything left in their coffers. I know this because they've already done it to my dad, who was born in the silent generation. So it's nothing new, but it sure won't get no better.

So, I'm not putting any money in a system that'll shaft me and I'm not saving anything for old age - most likely I'll be working until I die anyway.

What I do instead is, I enjoy as much free time now while I'm still young: I found me one of the last "old-style" jobs still available that lets me work 36 hrs/week with unreasonably great pay, in a heavily unionized old company that does business in a market that doesn't know the word recession.

In other words, I've maximized my salary/work ratio and I do as little work as possible to enjoy life the the fullest while I'm still in a condition to enjoy it. Time enough when I'm old and decrepit to kill myself at work for a living.

Comment Re:How long before estates of dead entertainers su (Score 1) 121

Also, I think people are underestimating the creative input that a performer puts into a voice performance. They can put in a lot of subtle emphasis and emotion into speech. Even if AI can perfectly replicate someone's voice, will it know when to emphasize a word, when to change the pitch of its voice, and when to insert a dramatic pause?

Comment Re: AT&T (Score 2) 208

To offer a mild defense of Apple, there's a reason they make messages a different color if you're using a non-Apple phone:

Their iMessage app debuted at a time when carriers generally still charged for SMS messages. If a blue message came in, it meant that it was going over iMessage, which meant that it was a free message. If it was green, it was SMS, and therefore it would be charged as an SMS message according to your carrier's plan. You definitely wanted to have a way to know the difference.

It's less important now that carriers are generally offering unlimited SMS messages, so you could argue that they could drop the distinction. However, there still may be places or situations where people are charged for SMS, even if only when doing international texting, so it's not completely meaningless. Also, iMessage still provides some different features, such as providing read-receipts (if you allow that) and being encrypted, so someone might care about knowing which messages are going over which service.

Comment Re:Wait... (Score 1) 67

Well they charge you a rental fee for a router (including a Wifi), or they let you purchase it for $150. In abstract, I think that's totally reasonable.

The problem is, they won't let you just supply your own router or operate without a router. You have to rent or buy their router. If you just want the Internet (not phone or TV), you can replace their router with your own once service is installed, but they still force you to purchase their router.

Comment Sadly, he's kind of right already (Score 5, Insightful) 307

If you want to keep unprincipled actors in the datamining sphere from getting (too much) information about you, you *can* avoid patronizing internet services that are run by them. That means you don't get to enjoy 95% of the internet, because every-fucking-thing is run/owned/exploited/controlled by Google, Facebook, Akamai, Cloudflare...

I'm unusually careful with what I do on the internet compared to most people I know, and every year I feel more and more socially handicapped. As in:

"Oh, you don't do Facebook? I'll send you the invite by email then".

"What do you mean you didn't find it? It's the first line in Google search... What the fuck is Duckduckgo?".

"You should have used Waze instead of that offline satnav: it shows traffic jams and speed cameras live! What do you mean it's evil?"

Etc etc etc...

Comment Re:Network-wide solution? (Score 1) 67

A lot of people seem to misunderstanding the nature of my question. I understand what a site-to-site VPN tunnel is, and I can set one up. The question is, is there a reputable service out there that provides some kind of proxy or site-to-site VPN that obscures the source of outgoing Internet traffic? The point here isn't to secure traffic between two endpoints that I control, but to make it so websites see all of my company's traffic as coming from an IP address other than my own, and where the service provider won't disclose the original source of the traffic without a subpoena.

The specific concern came out of the prospect that ISPs might start selling records of their Internet activity, and businesses with security concerns not wanting their ISP to be able to track that information in the first place.

Comment Re:Ya, it's called IPSec (Score 1) 67

My question wasn't whether it's technically possible to set up a VPN. It was more, is anyone providing that as a service? Specifically, one focussed on privacy (obscuring the source of the traffic and not logging), and also that is reputable security service (marketing to businesses rather than pirates).

Comment Network-wide solution? (Score 1) 67

With all this talk about using VPN for privacy, I've been wondering if there are any solutions that are designed to provide that kind of privacy across an entire LAN. If, for example, you wanted to make sure your company's web traffic was private, is anyone offering some kind of service that allows you to configure a common SMB firewall to route all outgoing traffic through a secure VPN/proxy?

I've had some clients request this, but I can't find anything that looks remotely reputable. Most of the services getting attention right now are designed to have software installed on every device.

Comment Re:Address the gap in the lineup... (Score 1) 163

I'm not saying that console games are making PC gaming obsolete. I'm saying people who are building fewer and fewer gaming PCs and generally people are buying fewer desktops.

I'm not sure what I'm supposed to infer from this. You're not saying that consoles are killing the gaming PC, but you're saying people don't buy gaming PCs. Are you saying that nobody is gaming anymore? Or are you trying to imply that consoles are killing the gaming PC while refusing to say that, for some reason? Because I notice you're also not saying that consoles *aren't* killing the gaming PC.

Yes but how soon does that GPU become obsolete? I mean you can still use decade old CPU just fine for general computing but decades old GPUs are basically unusable by gaming.

So you're simultaneously implying that consoles are killing the gaming PC because people aren't building PCs anymore, and also arguing that people won't buy a non-upgradable gaming PC.

Comment Re:I miss software that works. (Score 3, Interesting) 467

No, I'm saying software back then was buggier than it is today overall - either shoddily coded, taking certain OS settings for granted, or using undocumented system calls - in an environment where any old rogue program could do anything it wanted or take down the entire system. Anybody who remembers software working better back then remembers wrong.

Incidentally, to the credit of Microsoft, Windows was a masterpiece of backward compatibility for a long time, considering the amount of badly coded 16-bit and 32-bit shit programs it had to run properly.

Comment Re:I miss software that works. (Score 5, Interesting) 467

Hmm, I think memory is failing you here. I clearly remember many, many programs randomly crashing and taking the entire OS with it - and losing hours of work in the process, having to fiddle with hi memory and extended memory in DOS for hours to get some half-assed program to work, installing version after version of certain buggy drivers and goofing around with interrupt jumpers to get a somewhat stable system, etc etc etc. And the worst thing was trying to figure it all out on my own, without any internet forum to help me out.

It was fun at times, but mostly frustrating. I sure ain't missing those days...

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