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Comment Re:"What Difference Does It Make?!?!?!" (Score 2) 694

To be fair, the Republicans managed to toss the Democrats the most easily defeatable opponent ever in someone who is consistently offensive to nearly everyone including most of the party he is nominated for and the Democrats still couldn't actually field someone who could soundly beat him.

There was never a Democratic presidential nomination contest. Hillary's victory this week was decided on years ago. Maybe Bernie was the last to be told, but didn't you think it strange that the Dem contest was just Hillary vs. Bernie (plus the occasional third guy)?
The Republicans had over a dozen people vying for the spot, and say what you like about the man, but Trump got the votes, and the Republican establishment hated it. It was a real contest.

Comment Fixing Number Spoofing is Hard (Score 1) 120

Sure, it's just a simple matter of programming to re-architect the signalling system that's driven the phone companies since the mid-80s. Unfortunately, number spoofing has been an important feature for legitimate businesses - it lets them do things like always give you the number of their main office as caller-id, even if the person is calling from a remote office, or let you give the direct number of the caller, even if the call is getting routed through the company's main office PBX VOIP gateway. It also provides the ability to do a lot more complicated things. And (this mattered more back then than now) it let them run phone switches on processors that were made in the 1960s and 1970s, and with mainframes that might have 10 MIPS of CPU power (compared with the wimpy 1 MIPS VAX I was using in 1980.) My wristwatch probably has less RAM than that, but probably a much faster CPU, and my wimpy Android phone has about as much RAM as my VAX had disk.

And yes, within the next decade we may well have re-architected the world's phone systems away from the designs we used back then (and much of the implementation has changed radically already), but interface standards stick around a lot longer than implementations, and are a lot harder to get rid of.

Comment Re:Probably Trump (Score 1) 180

Tell me, why do you want to encourage the election participation of people who are too irresponsible to come up with $35* every five years? Is it because your platform sells well with people who can't think past tomorrow?

I'm a conservative, so encouraging poor people to vote actually hurts my party goals.

The problem is that I'm also a staunch defender of rights, and I feel that everyone should be allowed to vote as a right, and not some based on some arbitrary cutoff of responsibility.

[...] but go ahead and keep making the case that it's absolutely vital that people too stupid to get an ID every 5 years should be encouraged to vote.

To quote Malcom Reynolds: "who will speak for these people?"

They can speak for themselves. I stated above I'm fine funding programs that pay for the expenses associated with getting ID's.
If you're against voter ID you're pro-fraud. End of story. You can make any excuse you like (and toss in some claims about being conservative, too).
I see no reason to believe anyone who is making the same arguments as the administration, what with it's star liars Gruber, Rhodes, and the chosen successor Clinton.

Comment Re:Probably Trump (Score 0) 180

Getting an ID costs money in the US, so requiring an ID puts more strain on the poor than the working class.

The annual fee for a drivers license is around $35, a state-issued ID is around $30, and a passport costs $100.

When you're poor, that $35 could pay for 7 meals frugally made.

Social security cards are given out and replaced at no charge, but aren't generally accepted as an ID because they lack pictures.

Tell me, why do you want to encourage the election participation of people who are too irresponsible to come up with $35* every five years? Is it because your platform sells well with people who can't think past tomorrow?

I'm kidding, of course. We all know you're actually interested in promoting electoral fraud, and covering for that fraud with any available argument. Some studies have shown that minority voter participation actually goes up with ID laws- maybe they have more faith that their vote means something- but go ahead and keep making the case that it's absolutely vital that people too stupid to get an ID every 5 years should be encouraged to vote.

*I'd actually be fine funding programs to help people obtain proper ID in order to negate this line of thinking.

Comment Some of Tyson's thoughts.... (Score 1) 609

...should have died in the pot-fueled dorm room bullsh*t session they were formed in. This is one of them.
Like the article says, scientists are people too, and they may have finely honed their knowledge in their area of expertise, but beyond that, they know as much- or as little- as anyone else.
It's also absurd to think that the selection of topics of study, or the lead 'scientists' in charge of an area of policy, won't be driven by considerations outside of strict evidence. They'll fabricate it to obtain the pre-determined outcome- because that's what they do today in highly charged fields of study.

Comment Re:median vs average (Score 2) 622

Um, no. Unless your car is a complete shitbox to start with, or you drive ~100 miles per day every day, keeping it for 10-15 years will not cost you more than replacing it every six years. Depreciation is an accounting trick that only really works in aggregate. If your car is still running in six years time, keep it. You will save the cost of a new car. The fact that yours is worth zero on paper means absolutely nothing if it still works the way it's supposed to.

Bought a '98 Camry about 10 years ago for 8 grand. It's got 253,000 miles on it now. Off the top of my head, I've done the following non-routine maintenance to it:
Exhaust replacement, front to back: $575
Idle air control valve: $800 (Dealer because I didn't have a good cheap mechanic at the time.)
New suspension and steering parts & alignment: $800
Oil leak from oil pump: $500 (estimated mechanic cost, I did it for much less)
New air intake hose: $40

Let's round that up to $3000 in case I've forgotten a few things.

I have a car that is quiet, drives well, doesn't leak, and is reasonably comfortable. It gets 27 mpg and still has sufficient power. The money I've put in it to keep it in good working order for 10 years doesn't add up to 10 months of car payments.

Would I like a newer ride? Sure, and I may get one eventually. The fact is that I can keep this car comfortable and running for cheap money. The occasional $800 hit saves me a few thousand a year.

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