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Comment Desktop vs Server (Score 1) 268

I don't really care for the software on my desktop, as long as it works. Having said that, the only paid and closed source piece of software on my desktop is my IDE (being a developer and sysadmin). However, on servers, serving public facing services I'll probably always use open source software. If I need a bug fixed or a new feature implemented I don't want to rely on external parties. Sure, there's tons of contracts that you could sign, but experience learns that eventually the vendor isn't able to supply, and you'll need to fix things yourself.

Comment Re:Insanely complex (Score 2) 132

If this law is to be in place for the next 20+ years it'd be pretty moronic if it laid out a very detailed set of technical measures a party is expected to take. Luckily there's lawyers who can interpet the law, and apply it to the situation they're assessing, all of its context included. If other lawyers (i.e. prosecution) disagree with their views, we have judges who can elaborate on the law, and tell how it should be interpreted in situations like those.

Comment Re:Right to be forgotten? (Score 1) 132

You're leaving out some of the considerations that are at play here. That is that you have a right to learn from your mistakes, move on. Also, they're not prohibiting publishing those facts, the intention is merely to make it less easily findable. The USA has a similar mechanism, namely sealed court records, etc.

How Computer Vision Algorithms Cope With Detecting Human Figures In Art 22

KentuckyFC writes The human visual system has evolved to recognize people in almost any pose under a vast range of lighting conditions. But abstract art pushes this ability to its limits by distorting the human form. In particular, Cubism seeks to represent three-dimensional objects on a two-dimensional plane by juxtaposing snapshots from different angles. The result is that a Cubist picture contains many 'fragments of perception' of the same object. That's why it is often hard for people to recognize the human figures that these pictures contain. Now a group of computer scientists have tested how computer vision algorithms fare at the task of spotting human figures in Cubist art. They compared a variety of different algorithms against humans in trying to spot human figures in 218 Cubist paintings by Picasso. Humans easily outperform all the algorithms at this task. But some algorithms were much better than others. The most successful were based on so-called "deformable parts models" that recognize human figures by looking for body parts rather than the entire form. Interestingly, the team says this backs up various studies by neuroscientists suggesting that the human brain works in a similar way.

Comment The Hague, Capital of the Netherlands (Score 3, Informative) 165

According to the Dutch constitution Amsterdam is the capital of the Netherlands, although the parliament and the Dutch government have been situated in The Hague since 1588, along with the Supreme Court and the Council of State.[1][2]

Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C...


The Startling Array of Hacking Tools In NSA's Armory 215

littlekorea writes "A series of servers produced by Dell, air-gapped Windows XP PCs and switches and routers produced by Cisco, Huawei and Juniper count among the huge list of computing devices compromised by the NSA, according to crypto-expert and digital freedom fighter Jacob Applebaum. Revealing a trove of new NSA documents at his 30c3 address (video), Applebaum spoke about why the NSA's program might lead to broader adoption of open source tools and gave a hot tip on how to know if your machines have been owned."

Former CIA/NSA Head: NSA Is "Infinitely" Weaker As a Result of Snowden's Leaks 572

An anonymous reader writes "The Huffington Post reports, 'Michael Hayden, former director of the National Security Agency, said Sunday that he used to describe leaker Edward Snowden as a "defector," ... "I think there's an English word that describes selling American secrets to another government, and I do think it's treason," Hayden said ... Some members of Congress have also ... accused him of an act of treason. Hayden said his view of Snowden has grown harsher in recent weeks after reports that Snowden is seeking asylum in Germany and Brazil in exchange for assisting their investigations into NSA programs. Hayden said the NSA is "infinitely" weaker as a result of Snowden's leaks. "This is the most serious hemorrhaging of American secrets in the history of American espionage," he said. "What Snowden is revealing ... is the plumbing," he added later. "He's revealing how we acquire this information. It will take years, if not decades, for us to return to the position that we had prior to his disclosures."' — More in the Face the Nation video and transcript, including discussion of the recent legal decisions, and segments with whistleblower Thomas Drake, Snowden legal adviser Jesselyn Radack, and Washington Post reporter Barton Gellman who recently interviewed Snowden."

Submission + - RHEL 7 will be a KDE Desktop

An anonymous reader writes: At the 2013 linux Kernel summit Redhat spokesperson Lisa Truman revealed that the upcoming RHEL 7 will be based on the KDE Software Compilation desktop environment. "As you know we have been working on implementing Gnome 3 classic mode for RHEL 7. But after early feedback from our customers we have decided to switch to a KDE/QT based desktop for our flagship product". On what feedback Redhat received from their customers, Ms. Truman responded: "We at Redhat appreciate that many of our customers use non accelerated or legacy hardware for their workstations, and software rendering with llvmpipe may not fit the bill for them". "Also gnome-classic-mode is an emulation of a classic desktop and is lacking many important areas". When Ms. Truman was asked if the switch to KDE is the reason for the delay in the release of RHEL 7 she stated: "We are still on track to release RHEL 7 by the end of 2013".

Submission + - Silent Circle, Lavabit unite for 'Dark Mail' encrypted email project (computerworld.com.au) 2

angry tapir writes: Two privacy-focused email providers have launched the Dark Mail Alliance, a project to engineer an email system with robust defenses against spying. Silent Circle and Lavabit abruptly halted their encrypted email services in August, saying they could no longer guarantee email would remain private after court actions against Lavabit, reportedly an email provider for NSA leaker Edward Snowden.

How Big Data Is Destroying the US Healthcare System 507

KindMind writes "Robert Cringely writes on the idea that technological advances have changed the health care system, and not for the better. The idea is that companies now rate individuals instead of groups, and so move to a mode of simply avoiding policies that might lose money, instead of the traditional way that insurance costs were spread over a group. From the article: 'Then in the 1990s something happened: the cost of computing came down to the point where it was cost-effective to calculate likely health outcomes on an individual basis. This moved the health insurance business from being based on setting rates to denying coverage. In the U.S. the health insurance business model switched from covering as many people as possible to covering as few people as possible — selling insurance only to healthy people who didn't much need the healthcare system.'"

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