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Comment Re:You know I could get in to something like this (Score 1) 82

Well personally I've been quite happy with a number of the new features. Also security isn't irrelevant to me, given that I do work to keep my device secure by updating it, by running security software, and be screening what I install and only installing things I need.

I am talking about MY interest in something and ya, having new versions of software is something that I consider. If I'm getting a new device that is something I want.

Comment Matches my observations (Score 4, Funny) 192

Over the last couple of months, when I cut through one of the local parks on its bike trail, it's looked like the Night of the Living Dead: A bunch of zombies obliviously wandering around, staring down into their phones and cluelessly blocking the path.

Lately, the zombie outbreak seems to have abated somewhat, and the bike path isn't so much of an obstacle course.

Comment You know I could get in to something like this (Score 3, Interesting) 82

But only if they'd start releasing OS updates for their older hardware. Given that Samsung drops support after just 18 months, I don't think I'd want to buy a refurb since it is going to get updates for, at most 6 more months. If I am going to get something with no updates, I'd want it for actual used market prices, which is to say really cheap.

Comment Re:What the fuck are you whining about? (Score 1) 148

No, that's not the approach you take. If you think it is, well you need to grow up. You don't cause massive compatibility problems and huge disruptions just for the fun of it. Instead, you do things as smoothly as possible. There is no need to rush out IPv6, it isn't like the world will blow up. IPv4 works, and will continue to work.

You thinking that implementing something like this on a worldwide scale being cheap, easy or quick just shows a massive lack of experience and perspective.

Comment Re:Which US ISPs? (Score 1) 148

I can't speak authoritatively to Comcast, not having it, but everything I see says they have dual-stack on their entire residential network. Have you tried it? You have to set up DHCP-PD on your router (that is how most ISPs are doing it) and they should give you a prefix that your devices can use.

Comment What the fuck are you whining about? (Score 1) 148

What do you mean we've done nothing to move people to IPv6? Do you think it is magic? Do you think we just wave a wand and people are on v6? No, what it takes is rolling out support on the OS, router, ISP, and so on. That has been happening, lots. Have a look at Google's IPv6 chart: https://www.google.com/intl/en... what you see is exponential growth happening. This is actual IPv6 connections as well, Google is counting the percentage of people hitting their site with v6, which means an end-to-end connection.

Oh and ISPs have indeed been making IPv6 available to home users, wouldn't see that graph otherwise. For US cable providers Comcast is dual stack on their whole network, Time Warner is on about 90% of it, and Cox is on all of it. That's a whole lot of the US population. This isn't theoretical support either or "Oh call us and maybe we'll turn it on," it is live, on the network, and working now. On my Cox connection all I had to do was tell my router to get itself a prefix and go. My connections to Google, Netflix, and anyone else who supports v6 go out over it.

You don't "move" people to v6 as in force them on to it and turn off v4. Rather you make it available, and chosen by default, which is precisely is what is going on. When the device supports it (Linux including Android and Windows are both dual stack and prefer v6, not sure about OS-X), the router supports it, and the network supports it you are good to go.

Comment Which US ISPs? (Score 1) 148

Cox is dual-stack on their entire network. Comcast is likewise. Time Warner is about 90% done with IPv6 on their network. That most of the US's cable providers right there, with Charter being the only major that doesn't have IPv6 yet and they are working on it actively.

Not every ISP has it, of course, when you count DSL CLECs, dial up, and so on there are literally thousands of ISPs in the US. However it seems that most of the major cable providers do, and combined those guys serve a massive part of the US population.

In fact, have a look at Google's IPv6 adoption map: https://www.google.com/intl/en.... Looks like the US is doing pretty good. Not only is adoption high compared to most countries, but it works well.

Also remember that IPv6 adoption is more than just ISPs getting it. It needs end-to-end support in that users have to get IPv6 capable routers and devices, and have it enabled.

Comment Re:ALT+LEFT (Score 4, Insightful) 141

Because 'backspace to go back' is default behavior in a lot of programs, not just web browsers. Try it in File Explorer, for example.

Just like F1 being a nearly universal shortcut for 'help', F2 for 'rename', F3 or CTRL+F for 'search', and so on. I shouldn't have to relearn shortcuts for common behaviors in every program I want to use.

I thought that Alt+Left and Alt+Right *are* the standard shortcuts for going backward and forward in program histories. It's worked that way in every web browser I can remember using back to the 1990s, and it works that way in Windows Explorer. The backspace key doesn't even have an obvious corresponding "forward" key.

I wasn't aware that backspace was used to go back in history in any program. I always expect it to erase one character, or do nothing.

Comment Re:No internal structure? (Score 1) 190

By the time either a blimp or this thing deflates enough to make the engines flop around, there isn't going to be nearly enough lift of lift of any kind to keep it in the air.

But let's ignore that: You want to do this to a rigid airship.

Look at their history. Excluding the ones that burst into flames, many if not most of the major airships ever built ended up lost due to failure of their internal structures. They got shredded like pretzels with the slightest adverse aerodynamic forces. (Even the Hindenburg disaster probably initially involved the snapping of an internal bracing wire due to overzealous steering.)

If I had to ride in one of these white elephants, I'd still go with the inflatable version.

Comment Re:Depends on carrier but yes (Score 1) 198

Used to be that way in the US for all carriers. If they'd even let you BYOD, which was only sometimes, you still paid the full amount on your monthly bill so you were just getting screwed. Only ones that didn't were prepaid carriers, which tend to be niche (usually regional and targeting lower income customers).

However T-Mobile changed that, their big, and highly successful, marketing push was to do away with contracts which also meant doing away with subsidies. To respond to people complaining about upfront price they then did the 24 month financing.

Some of the others have followed suit now, since it was a successful campaign, but not all.

Comment There was that, but they did well before (Score 1) 188

The Athlon was very competitive with the P3, which was an exceedingly solid processor. So it wasn't just that Intel screwed up, but AMD had a well performing product to start with.

But then ya, they really slowed down and stopped improving. They kept rehashing the same architecture over and over. They introduced new features, like 64-bit, but the computational architecture was fundamentally the same. Meanwhile Intel was hard at work making the Core series and just continually improving.

Also AMD had a real problem in that while the Athlon was a good performer, the motherboard chipsets for it were fucking garbage. So the experience of owning an Athlon was a real mixed one and turned some people off. I got burned really badly by the original Athlon and compatibility issues with their motherboards and was turned off to AMD for some time because of it.

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