Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Curly braces = good. Indents = bad. (Score 1) 171

I don't know about everyone else, but I find it *immensely* helpful to write debugging statements without indentation. This makes it so that they stand out from the normal statements among which the debugging statements are inserted. This is the reason I won't even consider using Python.

Just stick "# XXX" comments around your debug code. Many editors automatically highlight XXX so prominently that it's just as easy to spot as unindented code.

Now, all you Python-indentation-style lovers, consider how you would code this kind of Go initializer:
        arr := [][]int{{1,2,3},{4,5,6}}
(This declares the variable 'arr' as a slice of slices of ints and initializes the variable.)

You mean, like:
arr = [[1,2,3][4,5,6]]
What's the problem?

Comment And the concept of extradition is well established (Score 1) 131

Happens all the time. If a person commits a crime against country A and they are in country B, country A may well ask country B to hand them over. If it happens or the details of it vary based off of the specific countries and their treaties, called extradition treaties. For example the US and North Korea? Ya not happening. There are no extradition treaties between those two, and the governments hate each other. so nobody is getting handed over. However EU nations? Extremely strong extradition treaties. If you commit a crime against Germany from France, Germany will have France arrest you and ship you over to stand trial.

The majority of nations have extradition treaties of some level with each other since they don't want criminals able to run off and hide from justice. It has been a thing for a long time.

Comment He's just showboating (Score 4, Insightful) 396

He's trying to get himself attention, and succeeding it would seem as here's a story on it.

Assange has acted rather oddly throughout this whole thing, at least if you take his rhetoric at face value. He happily went to Sweden and spent time there until these allegation came up, at which time he went to the UK. He then claimed that the reason was that the charges were BS and Sweden would just hand him over to the US because they were after him as soon as he went back. That of course makes one questions:

1) Why would he go to Sweden in the first place, if he knew it was a country that would hand him over to the US extra judicially?

2) Why would he flee to the UK and feel safe there, a country with such a special relationship with the US it is literally called the "special relationship"?

He then fought the extradition to Sweden in the UK courts and lost. They were ruling just on the validity of the extradition request, not on the validity of the charge behind it. He then fled to the Ecuadorian embassy, claiming that he'd be handed over to the US if he went to Sweden.

So there we are today. Now near as I know, the US has not sought his arrest. While they don't like him, it doesn't look like he's broken US law. Publishing classified US information isn't a crime if you weren't the one who had access to it. So a guy who has a security clearance and gets information and gives it to a paper, he's breaking the law. However the paper that then publishes it is not.

Now maybe he really does know something most don't, but it seems more likely this is just him trying to get in the news. He knows this is an empty offer since the US wouldn't agree to it as they don't have a valid charge to bring against him. This is all between him and Sweden and now him and the UK (even if Sweden dropped the charges, he still broke UK law be fleeing his bail). The US isn't involved.

Comment Re:Other than Brother... (Score 4, Insightful) 387

About 5 years ago, my Brother laser printer said it was low, so I taped over the window. A couple of years later, I did get off my lazy ass and ordered a new cartridge so that I wouldn't interrupt my workflow. However, the original cartridge that came with the printer still hasn't run out. I have no idea when and if I'll ever need to install the new cartridge.

As you can guess, I don't do very much printing. However, the "low toner" light probably started blinking after printing only about 1/4 of the total number of pages I've gotten out of it so far.

This whole episode does reinforce the decision I made before buying the laser printer: I will never, ever buy another inkjet printer as long as I live. Those cartridges seem to dry up, clog and die even if I don't use them. I got sick of spending $30 on a set of cartridges, only to get a hundred pages out of them before they became useless from age. At least laser printer toner seems to have an almost unlimited lifespan.

Comment Re:Technical Controls (Score 1) 95

I believe LTE does prevent a lot of the snooping. Part of the problem is that things evolved from really old-ass standards and so security was not always the consideration it should be. I mean remember that the original cell network:

1) Was all unencrypted analogue, the only thing preventing people from listening in was not having a radio that could tune the frequencies.

2) Had all kinds of odd shit related to compatibility with the old PSTN.

It was not even remotely secure. However, it was what we could do with the technology of the day.

Things have been getting better, particularly with VoLTE and the move to all packet switched data. It is always hard though because there are always tradeoff between easy of use, cost, features and security. It's easy on the surface to say that security should always be the top concern but you find out when you try to implement things that actually doing really strong security against all kind of attacks can be prohibitive at times and impede usability.

Comment Security is an advantage (Score 5, Interesting) 206

If properly implemented, and it seems Android and Apple do, contactless payment via your smartphone is a lot more secure than anything else. Some advantages it has:

1) A proxy number can be used for each transaction. Your real number need never be used at any time, as a proxy can be created for each transaction. The bank lets the phone know what proxies to use, and the phone lets the bank know when they are used. so even if the merchant gets completely owned, the information gleaned on you is useless as it was valid for that transaction only.

2) You have a device that can notify the bank of the validity of the transaction. Not only will the payment terminal contact the bank for payment, but your phone can let the bank know as well. Now there has to be some slack built in the system to make sure that it can work even if you don't have signal, but basically when your phone gets back on the network if the transactions don't agree, a flag can be raised.

3) You have some defense against a compromised terminal that overcharges (basically a merchant that has messed with their terminals to charge a different amount than displayed. Your phone knows how much the charge was, and shows it to you. If that is different from the amount on the screen, you can contact your bank there and then and stop the transaction.

4) The two-factor auth is taken off the device, on to your device. You have to unlock your phone to use the payment, so you have a 2-factor setup (your phone + either code or biometrics). However with chip+pin, the pin is entered on the terminal so if it is compromised, it can get your pin. The terminal can't get anything when a phone is used as the auth is on the phone, not the terminal.

It isn't flawless, but it is a decent step up from the security of just using a card.

Comment Bad security is NOT an invitation to break in (Score 4, Interesting) 85

You don't want it to become one either, or people can break in your house because it has shit security. Even if you have "good" security for a home, it still sucks in the grand scheme and is trivial to bypass. However I imagine you'd be pretty pissed if someone broke in and said "Well you have abysmal security, don't silence the messenger!"

That doesn't mean people shouldn't try and have good electronic security (and physical security for that matter) but that they don't is not an invitation or excuse for breaking in.

Comment Re:cable is not over the air waves (Score 1) 149

If a cable company puts some wire down, they ought to be able to do whatever they want with it as it does not interfere with other devices.

Before we implement your corporate utopia, first we need to rescind all property easements.

Then the cable companies can negotiate with each individual land owner to determine an appropriate agreed rental fee for allowing those wires in each parcel of property. If they can't come to an agreement with any particular owner, they can make deals with other land owners and re-route their cables.

Once all of that is complete, then they can completely deregulate cable.

Comment Re:Training is immoral (Score 2) 618

Problem is they still need to demonstrate why the current worker does not have those skills and cannot meet their needs. If you have someone already in a position and you aren't getting rid of them for cause, then presumably they meet the needs of that position. Thus if you bring in someone to replace them saying "This new person has technical skills we need" isn't really a valid argument.

Slashdot Top Deals

Economics is extremely useful as a form of employment for economists. -- John Kenneth Galbraith

Working...