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Comment Re:What's the plan, Stan? (Score 1) 202

Because shutting down extremist accounts ends violent extremism

For Twitter, you can assume that this is not so much about pushing agendas or silencing voices (or ending extremism). This is about making sure Twitter doesn't become an unpleasant place to be. If people stop going there because it sucks because it's full of lulz nazi eggs shouting caps-locked slurs at them, that hurts Twitter right in the pocketbook.

Argue all you want about Twitter's responsibility to defend free speech, but ultimately they're a business, and a business can't be perceived as though they're looking the other way while extremists harass and threaten their user base.

Comment Re:Exxon did nothing wrong ... (Score 1) 171

Exxon did nothing wrong... it could not, a company is not animate. People do things on behalf of the company.

You are apparently not familiar with Citizens United. Corporations are, for many legal purposes, people. You may think that's stupid (I certainly do), but it is the law of the land.

Comment Re:Podcasts (Score 1) 268

I commute on bicycle whenever I can, which is when most of my podcast listening happens (it's mostly trails and low-traffic neighborhoods, and I use earbuds that let a lot of ambient noise through). I also usually listen to them at about 1.3x speed, to pack a little more in. Unless my wife is listening with me, because she can't stand the sped-up talking. She says it makes her feel like bugs are crawling on her. Some kind of weird synesthesia thing, I guess.

Anyway, most of my podcasts are comedy:

  • Comedy Bang Bang - Comedy and improv from mostly L.A. based comedians, hosted by Scott Awkerman
  • Doug Loves Movies - Comedian Doug Benson has friends from comedy and film at a live taped discussion where they play movie-based games and generally joke around.
  • Stop Podcasting Yourself - Conversational comedy podcast with a couple really funny guys from Vancouver, Canada
  • My Brother, My Brother, and Me - Three brothers give fake advice and discuss dumb or funny Yahoo Answers questions
  • Never Not Funny - Another conversational comedy podcast hosted by Jimmy Pardo
  • The Flop House - A bad movie podcast, but with lots of amusing digressions and very funny hosts
  • The Beef and Dairy Network - Dry British humor: a fake beef and dairy podcast
  • The Dollop - a couple comedians pick a topic in US history and tell the story while riffing jokes about it.

I also like these non-comedy ones:

  • Stuff You Should Know - Educational, but fun, a new topic every time.
  • Slate's Culture and Political Gabfests - Panel discussions of the week's cultural and political happenings
  • Planet Money and Freakonomics - Two smart and interesting economics podcasts.
  • Radiolab - Mostly science stuff, but with storytelling elements and really good production

Comment Re:It was a joke to begin with (Score 1) 280

Of course anyone can be shown how to write a "hello world" application in any language but that doesn't make them a programmer.

We're talking about K-12 education here. The computer science training you give these kids is bound to be somewhat superficial, but it's still valuable. Part of what our education system is trying to offer at that level is a broad range of experiences so that students will be exposed to many things. When the time comes to start specializing in something (i.e. choosing a major in college), they will have a good idea of what subjects they enjoy and have an aptitude for. That's where they'll pick up the math and analytical skills and other foundational stuff. If they're not exposed to coding before then, it's much less likely they'll consider that path.

That's how it worked for me, anyway. I was not a computer hobbyist as a kid, but I had a programming class as a sophomore in high school that was pretty much just fiddling around with QBasic. I enjoyed it, and it came naturally to me. I ended up getting a computer science degree and I'm a working software engineer, a career I'm very happy in. Without that superficial high school coding experience, I don't think it would have crossed my mind to pursue a CS career. I am thankful for it.

Comment Re:Question for the editors (Score 4, Interesting) 410

Here's my question:

Mr. Sckreli, below is the Hare Psychopathy Checklist, a psychological tool for evaluating people for psychopathy. Please rate yourself on each trait on a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 meaning "I do not exhibit this trait at all" and 10 meaning "I fully exhibit this trait".

1. GLIB and SUPERFICIAL CHARM
2. GRANDIOSE SELF-WORTH
3. SEEK STIMULATION or PRONE TO BOREDOM
4. PATHOLOGICAL LYING
5. CONNING AND MANIPULATIVENESS
6. LACK OF REMORSE OR GUILT
7. SHALLOW AFFECT
8. CALLOUSNESS and LACK OF EMPATHY
9. PARASITIC LIFESTYLE
10. POOR BEHAVIORAL CONTROLS
11. PROMISCUOUS SEXUAL BEHAVIOR
12. EARLY BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS
13. LACK OF REALISTIC, LONG-TERM GOALS
14. IMPULSIVITY
15. IRRESPONSIBILITY
16. FAILURE TO ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY FOR OWN ACTIONS
17. MANY SHORT-TERM MARITAL RELATIONSHIPS
18. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY
19. REVOCATION OF CONDITION RELEASE
20. CRIMINAL VERSATILITY

Comment Got it right (Score 3, Informative) 91

Most of the articles I've seen about this inevitable dropoff in popularity have had an underlying implication that Niantic had done something very wrong. What is often left unsaid is the second part of this headline: it is still INSANELY profitable. SIX TIMES more profitable than its nearest competitor. Pokemon Go is still an app developer's wet dream. Yes, Niantic has had some big stumbles in their rollout, and yes, the fad has died down a lot. But they're still raking in money hand over fist, and they've still got a pretty loyal fan base, and if they're smart they'll continue to roll out new features to keep people interested for some time.

Comment Re:No thanks. (Score 4, Informative) 87

I read on a Kindle every day, and it's almost entirely content not purchased from Amazon. I use SendToKindle and InstaPaper to send interesting articles to my Kindle, I get books from the public library, Project Gutenberg, or buy them from other DRM-free sellers. Sometimes you have to convert from ePub using Calibre, but if you're already using Calibre to manage your eBooks, it's easy and seamless.

Comment Re:Smells Like A Fish Story (Score 1) 210

This is maybe possible, provided

  1. 1) he wasn't a very good programmer to start with
  2. 2) his job was very easy to automate
  3. 3) his manager was completely incompetent and had no idea what he was supposed to be doing

I know people who have been in QA for a half a decade who feel like they've forgotten how to code, but I bet if they started doing it again they'd pick it back up very quickly.

Comment Re:Not enough first-party content / Wasn't Hacked (Score 1) 230

Just out of curiosity, what are you missing by continuing to running homebrew channel on the vWii side? I guess you can't make use of the new controller (which everybody seems to agree doesn't add that much value anyway), and there's a little extra time switching modes, but otherwise it does pretty much what I want it to do, and homebrew is alive and well on Wii U.

Comment Online play (Score 1) 230

I still enjoy playing mine. I just hope that they continue to support online play for a good, long time, because Mario Maker and Splatoon will be pretty worthless without it.

I mean, I get why they'd discontinue a marginal platform like this, but Nintendo lives and dies by brand loyalty, and it would make me feel WAY less loyal to have several of my favorite games suddenly become mostly unplayable.

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