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Comment Easy to break (Score 1) 63

It's easy to break this kind of watermarking. You get K copies of the book, compare them, and take the most common version for each element. Choose K based on your budget and the degree of confidence you want that you've scrubbed everything.

For bonus points, you can analyze the types of differences and create novel watermark elements to confuse the watermark reader even more.

You have to analyze several types of media -- like CSS, HTML, and images -- but it's still pretty straightforward.

So this isn't that interesting.

Comment Re:They don't know what they're talking about (Score 2) 357

If the interfaces are fair use, I could have a non-GPL project depending on a GPL library, and that dependency won't affect the licensing of my project.

This reduces the difference between the GPL and the LGPL. However, in order to sidestep that difference entirely, you have to distribute your application separately from the GPL'd library.

As a practical matter, I don't think people tend to be that concerned when I, for instance, release code under the MIT license with GPL dependencies. Compile the work and distribute it, and you still have to follow the GPL's restrictions. But I might be wrong about that.

Comment Re:Minimizing Tracking (Score 1) 206

If you check the site, you'll see the extension adds an 'X-Forwarded-For' header with a random IP address. This tells the server on the far end that you're using a VPN and your real IP address is that random value.

That requires the site's tracking stuff to be moderately smart (to know about the header in the first place) but not terribly smart (or it would look up the owner IP on the far end of the connection and, if it's a residential ISP, trust that rather than a randomly generated IP address).

Omitting etag and cache control headers will make sites less efficient. If you don't enable javascript on untrusted sites, it shouldn't affect correctness. If you do enable javascript and people are using etags rather than query parameters to handle incremental updates, you might get strange results. (Like if gchat were doing this, you might find yourself getting a lot of chat history on each request, as if you had a full conversation every second or two.)

Altering etag and cache control headers to some time further in the past than the last time you loaded a file will result in less inefficiency.

Comment Re:This is the year of the Linux Desktop (Score 2) 407

I'm dual-booting my desktop. Everything works fine in both Linux and Windows with the exception of audio. Windows just can't do it.

Windows is convinced my speakers aren't plugged in and refuses to let me select them as the audio output, whereas Pulseaudio on Linux realizes that people sometimes want to select an audio device that doesn't appear to be plugged in at the moment.

(I might be able to find a driver to reinstall or something to get Windows to realize my speakers are plugged in, but it just isn't that important to me yet. I only installed Windows for the Unreal asset store, but I switched to Unity3d.)

Comment Re:Waaaahhhhh!! (Score 4, Insightful) 688

The project leader insults people a lot and is too distracted by a name to give my code a fair evaluation, so I'm going to stop trying to work with him in my free time and instead work on my own, where I can get things done without a ton of useless fighting.

There's plenty of puerileness here, but not from Garrett.

Comment Re:Can't take the heat? (Score 5, Insightful) 688

Why should a person face a gauntlet of incivility and vitriol, one that you liken to a frying pan, to contribute to an open source project?

Code reviews, design reviews, that makes sense. Being referred to someone at a lower paygrade rather than the top tier of kernel devs, sure. These things are stressful but essential. I'd stand to lose considerable self-esteem from them, but there's nothing I can do about that but get better.

But if I went into a code or design review at work and got a Torvalds-style response, I'd be reporting the person to HR and finding a more civil person to work with. If I couldn't work around them and nobody was making them change, I'd find another job. I could try to modify the problematic person's behavior, but that would be stressful and unlikely to work, and I shouldn't have to act as my coworkers' parent.

Garrett found that there was no HR to appeal to, no way to work around Torvalds, and no way to change him. So he did in fact get out of the frying pan. He doesn't deserve to be seared whenever he gets anything done, so he's not tolerating it. Now he's getting the same things done in a way that normal people will be happier with.

This isn't a deficiency on his part. He merely doesn't want to deal with something that normal people shouldn't have to deal with.

Comment Re:Issue is more complicated (Score 1) 928

The individual variation on this metric dwarfs any trends along gender lines.

You're also missing the "will shout in your face with invective and insults" versus "will act professionally toward you" axis, which is what we're concerned with here. Shouting in people's faces is much more gendered.

Comment Re:Time to Stop with Political Correctness (Score 1) 244

Privatized prisons demand the same payment regardless of the number of inmates. It's based on the number of beds instead, or it's per facility. So the incremental cost of incarcerating one more person is negligible. Over the long term, in aggregate, it can get expensive, but the cost of prisoner N+1 tends to be pretty small.

Prison labor programs offer large companies the opportunity to get labor at negligible cost and workers who are not legally able to leave or unionize. Whole Foods uses prisoners to grow tilapia, for instance. So there's a strong incentive to keep prisons full. Of course, whatever pittance they earn is spent in the commissary, so it's not like they can save up any money to make a better life for themselves afterwards.

If we could instate a living wage and extend it to prisoners, that would remove a good chunk of the motivation to keep prisons full while also providing prisoners a way to save up money for later. If we also forbade privatized prisons, we'd have our incentives aligned to keep people out of prisons and to address the problems that motivate crime. But that's a long ways away.

Comment Re:"popular forum" (Score 1, Troll) 370

She posted on a board on which people called out others' bad behavior online. Doxxing was against that board's rules. Calling for online-only raids on other sites was against their rules, as I recall. That was around 2004, so it's hardly representative of her current behavior.

Do at least a modicum of research before repeating lies, please.

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