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Comment Re:will probably take off with next gen hardware (Score 1) 81

Hololens is not VR

Indeed. AR doesn't seem to trigger the same motion sickness responses as VR, because you retain all of the visual cues from the real world.

Microsoft is once again creating a product that nobody will use.

Microsoft has created a technology that anyone can use without feeling motion sick, but you think that it will lose in the marketplace to one that about 80% of people can use without feeling motion sick? That's an interesting perspective.

Comment Re:It's just too expensive for the hardware (Score 1) 81

It's not so clear with 3D. It's something of a misnomer to call current displays 2D and this kind of VR interface 3D. Both provide a subset of the dozen or so cues that the human brain uses to turn inputs into a 3D mental model. They both, for example, manage occlusion and distance blurring, but neither manages (yet) to correctly adjust the focal depth of parts of the image that are further away. Motion sickness is caused by disagreements between some of these cues and between the other cues that you use to build your mental model of the world. VR adjusts the image based on your head position (though latency here can cause problems as the visual signal and the inner ear signal come at different times), but it turns out that humans have a very strong notion of body image, so if they don't correctly track your arm positions and update them in the game then this causes nausea in a lot of people.

Unfortunately for the 3D film and game industry, it's not the case that simply adding more cues reduces the risk of motion sickness. It turns out that a third-person perspective on a 2D display is one of the minima for the percentage of the population to experience motion sickness. Move to first person, and this gets worse, though it's still a tiny percentage (some people can't play FPS games for more than a few minutes without feeling sick). Add a few more visual cues and you get a lot more people feeling sick. There's obviously a minimum when you get all of the cues right, because otherwise people would spend their entire lives experiencing motion sickness, but so far none of the mainstream 3D systems have found another point that's close to the 2D display. If you're going to develop a first-person game, and you can either develop it for a technology that 99% of humans can use without feeling sick, or spending more money to develop it for a technology that 80% can use, which would you do?

Comment Re:Oh please (Score 1) 151

The type of "hello world" is const char *, so your compiler should warn that you're dropping the const in an implicit cast (and if you're a sensible person and compile with -Werror, then your compiler will reject the code). You can get the behaviour that you want with:

const char s[] = "hello world";

This will copy the contents of the string literal into a mutable array. If you write this at the global scope, the copy will be done at compile time, so you'll end up with the string in the data section, not the rodata section (if you do it in a variable with automatic storage, you'll get a copy every time the variable comes into scope). Putting constant strings in the rodata section is important for optimisation, because it allows them to be coalesced. If you write "hello world" in two place, then you'll end up with a single string in the rodata section. With some linkers, if you also write "world" somewhere else, then you'll just get two pointers into the same string (this is also one of the reasons that C uses null-terminated strings: you can't do this with Pascal strings, and it saved a useful amount of memory on the PDP-11). Once you're sharing the string, it becomes a really bad idea to allow someone to modify it, because that modification will then become visible in a different bit of code.

Comment Re:Oh please (Score 1) 151

That's pretty common for OO languages (or, in fact, any language with a notion of subtyping), where individual classes implement their own comparison operators. In C++ you can overload the comparison operators, but most OO languages that don't do operator overloading just use a named method. If you write a.equals(b), then you'll call the equals method implemented by the class of a. If you write b.equals(a) then you'll call the method implemented by the class of b. One may know about the other, but the converse is not guaranteed. The Objective-C collection classes document certain invariants for inserting objects into sets (or as keys in a dictionary), including that [a isEqual: b] implies [b isEqual: a] (and that [a isEqual: b] implies that [a hash] equals [b hash]), but this is impossible to statically verify in the general case.

Comment Re:lack of foresight (Score 1) 129

There have been many people that argued the preamble implies citizen only

This goes to something I say here frequently; Who is a citizen of this land is in the eyes of the beholder. Because unless one has some native American blood in them, they are an illegal immigrant. You could ask Chief Ten Bears what he thinks, but we violated those treaties (three or four of 'em) and it eventually killed him. To come back to the point, unless one wishes to bend over backward and read into it things that were not put in, the rights granted were not the exclusive to citizens. They apply to anyone within the jurisprudence of the US, and I would include areas were it is de facto, rather than de jure.

Comment Re: Hyperbole stew (Score 1) 508

* will get a STFU pinko commie Muslim , love it or leave it....*
I like to point out to those that say "America, love it or leave it!" is like saying "My mother; drunk or sober!".

When someone you love commits an error, one generally, out of love, points out the error. It is not a statement of hate to say "Hey, that's wrong", it can be the greatest expression of love. This is what confuses some, as they use the attempt to discuss a possible error or injustice not to correct that error or injustice, but as a club to stifle and shut down discussion. Because if one thinks something is wrong and says so, obviously they do it out of hate and a desire to destroy. That's a pretty sicko attitude I think.

Comment Re:Marketers are idiots (Score 1) 47

Apple hasn't just been talking about this, they've implemented this for a while. Many of their devices take a physical SIM and also contain an eSIM, so you can have the SIM for your home network in their physically, but when you travel abroad you don't need to physically buy a local SIM to use for a week, you just pull up the settings screen and buy a short-term plan from one of a variety of different providers.

Comment Re:This is an OS (Score 2) 156

Try deleting all of your Google cookies and visiting YouTube. You can't even watch a video until you've clicked through a bunch of T&Cs explaining that you agree to their data collecting and sharing. There's a button at the bottom saying 'I agree' and another saying 'other options', if you click on the second one, then you get to a big page full of text that basically boils down to 'sucks to be you.' If you create a Google account, then you can somewhat restrict what they'll collect to anonimised, but there's a load of research showing that basically any form of anonimised data can be deanonimised by combining it with other data sets (which, by coincidence, Google also collects).

Comment Re:Next disaster will be smartphones and headphone (Score 1) 274

Repair manuals won't help with mobile phones. They're rarely thrown away because of hardware issues. It's far more likely that they will be thrown away because they are no longer getting software updates. In the case of iOS and some Android devices, a locked bootloader prevents third parties from supporting them, in the case of most Android devices there's no financial incentive for longer-term support so no one does. For example, I have an old HTC Desire that still works fine. It's a bit underpowered, but still runs a lot of modern Android apps. Unfortunately, the last CyanogenMod build for it is based on Android 2.3, which includes an old TLS stack that only supports versions of the protocol and cypher suites that are now not supported by servers because of known vulnerabilities. This means that it can't connect to any HTTPS URL, for example. I can install F-Droid on it, but F-Droid can't fetch the repositories over HTTPS. I can side-load applications, and as long as they don't use TLS (or ship their own TLS implementation), they work fine. It probably has several other known vulnerabilities though.

At least with CRTs, replacing them with a modern LCD will cut the power consumption by a huge amount (20-50W, vs 100+W), so there's a good reason for using the newer technology. A 7-year-old Android phone is about as capable as a low-end budget phone now, yet became effectively unusable after about 4 years of life.

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