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Comment Why are there only six? (Score 1) 228

I can't be the only one who noticed this. They're supposedly concerned that government agents have actually infiltrated Tor -- and yet they only have six demands that are related to that.

And yet there's ten demands about the Appelbaum investigation.

It seems like government agents infiltrating Tor would be a bigger concern....

Submission + - Cell-Jamming Technology Is Being Turned on Journalists? (mintpressnews.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Technology developed to jam cellphones during the Iraq War may be getting deployed against journalists reporting on protests against the political establishment in the United States.

While police and government surveillance of protests, including monitoring of cellphone use, is well-documented, efforts to block signals at protests remains an oft-repeated, but never proven, rumor.

It may be impossible to definitively prove that authorities are using cellphone “jamming” technology, but journalists working with both mainstream and independent media reported unusual difficulties accessing the internet during recent protests at the gates of the Democratic National Convention, consistent with the effects this very real technology could have.

During the protests outside the DNC, which I covered for MintPress News, I experienced this personally, with my internet connection behaving suspiciously near the convention’s security fences and entrance gates, often abruptly blocking my tweets and other communication. The same was true for every other journalist I spoke with who covered the protests.

“It’s scary for me as a journalist because that’s how state suppression of events occurs,” said Desiree Kane, a freelance journalist and direct action organizer who covered the Republican National Convention for MintPress and also took part in protests in Philadelphia.

“That’s exactly how it happens is you block communications of what might be going down,” she added. ‘By Tuesday night, everybody noticed’

Jon Ziegler, an experienced citizen journalist, spoke with me on July 28, the final day of the DNC. He recalled his shock at the obvious disruption to his service during the previous days’ events.

Ziegler, who livestreams on several social networks under the name @Rebelutionary_Z and supports his work through crowdfunding, has been covering protests and activism like that which occurred in Philadelphia since the early days of the national Occupy Wall Street movement in 2011.

“I’ve streamed all over the country. I’ve streamed in big cities and small towns, large crowds, any type of situation you can imagine,” he said.

He said it’s important to distinguish between normal, everyday disruptions — for example, a temporary loss of signal caused by tall buildings during protests in downtown Philadelphia — and the seemingly deliberate interruptions journalists experienced near the Wells Fargo Center, the site of the DNC in South Philadelphia.

“You have some data reception issues for here and there, but they always will correct themselves, and I can usually do some measures to get back up live very quickly.”

Just before traveling to the convention, Ziegler upgraded his livestreaming equipment so that he could access a portable WiFi hotspot through Verizon and another phone using AT&T. This would allow him to alternate between the two networks at a moment’s notice. In addition, he uses multiple livestreaming apps connected to his Twitter account, allowing him to switch apps during interruptions.

“Here in Philadelphia, I’ve actually had the most options for connecting to the internet and streaming services that I’ve ever had in the four years that I’ve been doing this, and yet I’ve encountered the most problems, especially down by the gate of the DNC, than ever before.

Connection problems occurred with varying degrees of severity throughout the week of the DNC, and it was a frequent topic of conversation among journalists. “Monday night we we were talking about how it was strange, but by Tuesday night, everybody kind of noticed, ‘Wait a minute, this isn’t right,’” Ziegler said.

“At some points, even just trying to send tweets out was impossible,” he continued. “Heaven forbid you try to upload a video or photo, but sometimes even text tweets are impossible to get out.”

Regardless of the network carrier and the livestreaming app he used, Ziegler was often stymied.

“Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, the second we even get close to those gates my livestream gets glitchy, or drops out completely, or you just can’t connect to the internet at all.”

Comment First cool site was 'the liquid oxygen barbecue' (Score 2) 136

The first really cool site that I remember was where a guy poured liquid oxygen onto his barbecue. You can still watch it at Archive.org...

There was a massive fireball -- and a huge rush of adrenaline. I was always kind of sad that they didn't find some way to keep the original web page on the internet forever...

Comment Re:Why would Putin fear Clinton? (Score 1) 769

Um, what would you consider to be a qualification?

I mean, it seems like a good answer would be "Six years as secretary of state, plus eight more years of meeting world leaders as First Lady -- and then another six years as a U.S. Senator." Your response is "Nah, that's not experience....."

So what is?
Crime

Journal Journal: Driving Tips 5

Keep your tires properly inflated

Always use your seat belt

If you drive a nice car, wear a chauffeur's cap, and seat all passengers in back.

And make damn sure to check your tail lights before leaving the house! It also would help if the covers can resist a couple of whacks with the billy club. Shopping tip - Try to replace the bulbs with multiple LEDs. They last much longer and are harder to knock out.

Comment Re:Alfred Hitchcock (Score 1) 296

> Alfred Hitchcock was known as the "master of suspense" precisely because he avoided chopping the scene to pieces with a million different camera angles.

I was all set to argue with this. ("Then how do you explain the shower scene in Psycho?") But actually, yeah, it's preceded by a long, slow, continuous take of the door to the bathroom opening. And for that matter, there's that whole long scene in "The Man Who Knew Too Much" where the orchestra keeps playing, slowly, slowly, and there's tension pretty much because the scene is dragging on...

Submission + - Would you trust medical data stored on AWS by CareMonkey? (caremonkey.com)

rolandw writes: My teenage daughter's school in the UK wants me to approve the storage of her full medical details in CareMonkey. CareMonkey say that this data is stored on AWS and their security page says that it is secured by every protocol ever claimed by AWS (apparenlty). As a sysadmin and developer who has used AWS extensively for non-secure information my alarm bells are sounding. Should I ignore them and say yes? Why would you refuse?

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