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Submission + - 4chan: The Skeleton Key to the Rise of Trump (medium.com)

asjk writes: Article describes how the young, disaffected users not only helped elect Donald Trump but also "invented the meme as we use it today." Further, the author claims Anonymous arose from the users utilizing discussion forums without becoming members, hence, anonymous.

Submission + - Techdirt asks judge to throw out suit over "Inventor of E-mail" (arstechnica.com)

walterbyrd writes: Michael Masnick, who founded the popular Techdirt blog, filed a motion today asking for a defamation lawsuit against him to be thrown out. Masnick was sued last month by Shiva Ayyadurai, a scientist and entrepreneur who claims to have invented e-mail in 1978 at a medical college in New Jersey.

In his motion, Masnick claims that Ayyadurai "is seeking to use the muzzle of a defamation action to silence those who question his claim to historical fame."

Submission + - SAP "named-user" license fees are due even for indirect users, court says (networkworld.com)

ahbond writes: Beverage firm Diageo could be on the hook for an additional £55 million in license fees because it gave Salesforce users access to data held in an SAP system. SAP's named-user licensing fees apply even to related applications that only offer users indirect visibility of SAP data, a U.K. judge ruled Thursday in a case pitting SAP against Diageo, the alcoholic beverage giant behind Smirnoff vodka and Guinness beer.

The consequences could be far-reaching for businesses that have integrated their customer-facing systems with an SAP database, potentially leaving them liable for license fees for every customer that accesses their online store.

"Business are signing up to an open-ended direct debit which they can't withdraw from. It's really not surprising that many are now choosing the certainty and low cost of Google and Amazon Web Services"

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Do You Care About Tech Conferences?

An anonymous reader writes: I'm a beginning programmer — I literally just started my programming career this September. So shat exactly is the role of tech conferences? I always assumed they were mostly for exhibitors to pitch me things, but then what's in it for me? Am I just going there to network, or am I learning new cutting-edge techniques and getting enlightened by awesome training sessions? Or is it just a fun way to get a free trip to Las Vegas?

And then what's in it for my employer, who's paying to send me there? If my boss has to approve the cost of attending a conference, what's going to make him say yes? I mean, do employers really get enough value from that extra conference-only information to justify sending off their employees for several days of non-productivity? (Don't they know all that networking could lead me to job offers from other companies?)

It's always been a little intimidating the way people talk about conferences, like everyone already knows all about them, and drops the conference's name into the conversations like you should already know what it is. I always assumed people just attended only conferences for their current programming language or platform — but is there more to it than that? What exactly is the big deal?

Submission + - Disney Lobbying Florida to Let Kids Take Coding In Place of Foreign Languages

theodp writes: The Miami Herald reports that Florida lawmakers are again proposing a contentious plan that would put coding and foreign language on equal footing in a public high school student’s education. Under a proposed bill (SB 104 — Computer Coding Instruction), students who take two credits of computer coding and earn a related industry certification could then count that coursework toward two foreign language credits. "I sort of comically applaud that some would want to categorize coding as a foreign language," said Miami-Dade Schools Supt. Alberto Carvalho. "Coding cannot be seen as an equivalent substitute." Disclosure records show that Walt Disney Parks and Resorts has three lobbyists registered to fight in support of the bill. Disney did not return an email seeking comment, but State Sen. Jeff Brandes said the company’s interest is in a future workforce. With tech-backed Code.org, Disney has provided signature tutorials for the nation's Hour of Code over the past three years, including the Disney Frozen Princess-themed tutorial credited with 'teaching President Obama to code.'

Submission + - 14,000 Domains Drop Dyn's DNS Service After Mirai Attack (securityledger.com)

chicksdaddy writes: How much does a DDoS attack cost your business? That's a difficult question to answer and often depends on the type of business you operate. But in the case of managed DNS provider DYN, the answer is pretty concrete: about 8%.

New data suggests that some 14,500 web domains stopped using Dyn's Managed DNS service in the immediate aftermath of an October DDoS attack by the Mirai botnet. That is around 8% of the web domains using Dyn Managed DNS, The Security Ledger reports. (https://securityledger.com/2016/10/shoddy-supply-chain-lurks-behind-mirai-botnet/)

The new estimate comes from data compiled by the firm BitSight (https://www.bitsighttech.com/).

The October attack on Dyn by the Mirai botnet caused short-lived pain for Internet users trying to reach popular web sites like PayPal, Twitter, Reddit, Amazon, Netflix, and Spotify. The Bitsight data suggests the attacks may have had more lasting implications for Dyn – and other Internet companies like it.

“The data show that Dyn lost a pretty big chunk of their customer base because they were affected by (Mirai),” said Dan Dahlberg, a Research Scientist at BitSight Technologies in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dahlberg was speaking at an event in Cambridge on January 24.

To determine the impact of the Mirai attack on the firm, BitSight, which provides security rating services for companies, analyzed a set of 178,000 domains that were hosted on Dyn’s managed DNS infrastructure before ad immediately after the October 21st attacks. Around 145,000 of those exclusively used Dyn as their managed DNS provider. While around 33,000 used Dyn as one of their authoritative DNS providers.

Following the attack, 139,000 of the 145,000 domains continued to use Dyn exclusively, a loss of 6,000 domains or around 4% of the total. Among those domains that used Dyn along with other managed DNS providers, 25,000 continued to use Dyn after the attack, a loss of 8,000 domains or 24%. The absolute numbers are a sample based on observed domains using Dyn prior to the attack occurring, BitSight said.

Submission + - SPAM: 14,500 Domains Dropped Dyn After Mirai Attack

chicksdaddy writes: The Mirai botnet attacks that took managed Domain Name System services from New Hampshire based Dyn offline in October caused short-lived pain for Internet users trying to reach popular web sites like PayPal, Twitter, Reddit, Amazon, Netflix, and Spotify.

The attacks may have had more lasting implications for Dyn – and other Internet companies like it. New data suggests that around 8% of the web domains relying on Dyn’s managed DNS service dropped the service in the immediate aftermath of the attack, The Security Ledger reports. ([spam URL stripped])

Approximately 14,500 web domains that used Dyn’s managed Domain Name System services prior to the Mirai attack stopped using them immediately following the attack, according to data compiled by the firm BitSight ([spam URL stripped]) – a big blow to the company that was on the receiving end of the global Internet of Things botnet attack.

“The data show that Dyn lost a pretty big chunk of their customer base because they were affected by (Mirai),” said Dan Dahlberg, a Research Scientist at BitSight Technologies in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dahlberg was speaking at an event in Cambridge on January 24.

To determine the impact of the Mirai attack on the firm, BitSight, which provides security rating services for companies, analyzed a set of 178,000 domains that were hosted on Dyn’s managed DNS infrastructure before ad immediately after the October 21st attacks. Around 145,000 of those exclusively used Dyn as their managed DNS provider. While around 33,000 used Dyn as one of their authoritative DNS providers.

Following the attack, 139,000 of the 145,000 domains continued to use Dyn exclusively, a loss of 6,000 domains or around 4% of the total. Among those domains that used Dyn along with other managed DNS providers, 25,000 continued to use Dyn after the attack, a loss of 8,000 domains or 24%. The absolute numbers are a sample based on observed domains using Dyn prior to the attack occurring, BitSight said.

Link to Original Source

Comment What I learned from this article (Score 1) 401

The author says you should learn multiple languages, which I think is correct. The "popularity" question is really just a way to figure out which languages it's most important to brush up on if/when you're looking for your next job.

And there's really no surprise there. The "C family of languages," and also Python, is a pretty good start.

Comment Wasn't Android supposed to be Open Source? (Score 1) 186

Honestly, the only way that I see this happening is if Google decides to make their AI interface open source. Which they might do as a public service -- but we're still playing in Google's sandbox.

Unless there's some way to get geeks to contribute their unused CPU cycles, like what SETI was doing...

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