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Comment Follow the money (Score 2, Insightful) 32

Blockchain? Open-source? Kind of like Bitcoin : sounds good eh?

Remember this: whatever banks concoct and why they decide to do it isn't for the good of their customers, but that of their rich fuck shareholders. Yes, that's the same rich fucks who caused the latest recession - and the one before that, and the one before that...

Still want in on their latest project? I don't...

Comment Re:Into a few hands, like cloudflare? (Score 3, Informative) 87

Yeah, I was thinking the same thing: that's rich coming from Cloudflare - the company that single-handedly decides you can't access vast swathes of the internet if you're connecting from a TOR exit node.

That company does more than all the others put together to make my internet browsing experience completely miserable...

Comment Re:"I do not recollect" (Score 1) 409

[No, don't get me started on Trump. Please, everyone, vote 3rd party.]

Sure, great! Which third party do you prefer--the one that just dropped homeopathy from their platform this year and whose nominee flew to the wrong city today, or the one that had the Iron-Cross-tattooed candidate performing a striptease at the podium during their convention?

(The moral of the story is that third parties are a special, highly-distilled breed of terrible, but we happily give them a pass because we all know they're hopeless yutzes doomed to failure.)

Comment Re:Logic Says It Should Be Legal (Score 2) 396

There's also no reason that autoinjectors could not be modified to have some of the useful properties of regular syringes. For example, if part of the case of the autoinjector were transparent, users would be able to see how much of the drug remained just as with a syringe and thereby avoid partial doses.

Comment Re: You gotta love yellow journalism (Score 4, Insightful) 63

I agree. Open source and Linux should never be criticized. Any criticism is false and, therefore, is yellow journalism. I find any criticism of Linux to be highly offensive and indicative of spamming from paid Microsoft trolls.

Way to mix issues here.

1/ Should open source or Linux be criticized? Hell yes, if there are reasons to.

2/ You conflate Linux and open-source. They aren't the same issues - they aren't even the same thing. Open-source is a development and business model and Linux is a fucking kernel.

3/ Drupal is to be critized here. Not Linux. Linux as a kernel is doing what the flawed middleware on top of it tells it to. No more, no less. Show me a Linux kernel exploit and I'll be the first to criticize Linux. But in this case, it ain't the culprit.

I can sort of understand people mixing up GNU things and the Linux kernel, because it's been done for years, and people grew tired of hearing Stallman repeat "it's not Linux, it's GNU/Linux" a long time ago. But Drupal has never been remotely connected to Linux. What next? Run Drupal on FreeBSD and claim FreeBSD has been owned by a trojan?

Comment is lack of development a problem? (Score 1) 515

Why is lack of development necessarily a problem? Lots of very useful programs have seen little development recently because they already do well what they are supposed to do. In the case of user interfaces, it is far from clear to me that development represents progress. Personally, as someone who makes heavy use of the command-line and has zero interest in copying MS Windows, I was quite happy with the window managers of a decade ago and currently have to spend time setting up a new machine to configure Gnome Classic the way I like it. Developments like Unity are just an impediment. I recognize that other users, and in particular, other types of users, have different preferences, but I see no reason to impose the type of interface that one class of user likes on everyone else.

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