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Comment The advice you actually asked for (Score 1) 301

Listen man, The best system administrator is the one who keeps things running smoothly. I want the most BORING SA report-out ever. I don't want to see graphs and charts with spikes and trends, I want UPTIME. Flat lines. Predictability. If there are problems, face into those and knock them out. Shift that flat line upward once in a while and wow them with your ability to troubleshoot and problem solve. But if it ain't broke, don't fix it, and remember that executives need to focus on other things to ensure you keep your job. Uptime and reliability are paramount from the executive standpoint. Good questions.

Comment Never mind confidentiality... (Score 1) 480

Users are accepting of system outages when it's their personal stuff, and even then, only barely. When your clients start asking for "Free IT Stuff", remind them that nothing is free, and that when Gmail goes down, there is nothing you, as their support staff, can do about it. And yes, confidentiality is important, and no, Google doesn't provide it.

Comment Fitness of security (Score 1) 195

The answer depends on the nature of the websites you built, how critical they are to their owners, and the sensitivity of the data contained in them. In other words, if you built a few blog sites or simple DB-driven PHP inventory sites, you're not likely to invite any potent hackers for there is no payoff. However, if you are protecting critical data (PII), or the sites are mission-critical, you will need to invest resources to properly defend them. I imagine you live someplace in the middle, so Google for the top ten web security threats and start at the top.

In short, read something, dude. The only difference between a developer and a white hat is knowledge. Get some.

Comment Re:Markup language != programming language (Score 1) 85

Writing a few lines of a data markup language does not make you a programmer , you have not "developed" anything and hence what you have written is not an "application"... Lets get this straight - a friggin chimp could code in a markup language given 2 hours training.

Doesn't ease of use make it superior rather than inferior? Your comment reminds me of how lots of programmers reacted to the .Net framework ---

"This is script kiddy stuff that requires zero programming skill!"

You're absolutely right. Now don't let the door hit you on your way out.

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