Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. ×

Submission + - Cyber Security: Protecting Seniors Online from Scams, Hacks and Tax Fraud

tamarartamonova writes: The vast majority of seniors today are using the Internet at least once a week to check email, pay bills online and keep in touch via social media. But all that time online puts them at risk for scams and hacks, such as tax fraud.

In fact, a new survey by Home Instead, Inc., franchisor of the Home Instead Senior Care network, found that 67 percent of surveyed older adults have been the victim of an online scam or hack.

Encouraging seniors to practice cyber security can go a long way toward protecting their identity and sensitive financial information. Home Instead collaborated with the National Cyber Security Alliance to create Protect Seniors Online, available at www.ProtectSeniorsOnline.com, a free resource that educates older adults about cybersecurity. Here, seniors can test their cybersecurity skills with the "Can You Spot an Online Scam?" quiz.

Older adults can take the following steps now to protect themselves online:
  • Password protect and secure devices, accounts. Lock all devices (including computers, tablets and smartphones) with secure passwords in case devices are lost or stolen.
  • Think before clicking. When faced with an urgent request — like emails asking for money — think before clicking or get a second opinion. Clicking on links is often how scammers get personal information. When in doubt, trash an unusual message.
  • Share with care. More than half (51 percent) of seniors surveyed by Home Instead use social media to stay connected. Use care when sharing personal information, adjust privacy settings to limit who can see your information, and turn off location sharing.
  • Use security software. Install anti-virus and anti-spyware software and program it to run regularly. And be wary of pop-up ads or emails, many of which contain malware that can infect computers.
  • Log out. Log out of apps and websites when you are finished. Leaving apps and websites open on computer screens could make you vulnerable to security and privacy risks.
  • Recommend support. Older adults who live alone may need help from a trusted source — such as a family member, tech-savvy friend or professional caregiver --to serve as a second set of eyes.

Submission + - Obama's Feds Tried to Hack Indiana's Election System While Pence Was Governor

EmmaStarc writes: Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officials tried to hack Indiana’s state electoral system with at least 14,800 “scans” or hits between Nov. 1, 2016, to Dec. 16, 2016, The Daily Caller News Foundation Investigative Group has learned.

The attacks are the second confirmed IT scanning assault by DHS officials against states that resisted then-President Barack Obama’s attempt to increase federal involvement in state and local election systems by designating them as “critical infrastructure” for national security. .Source

Submission + - SPAM: Gitlab post-mortem: Proper naming convention prevents mistakes

AmiMoJo writes: Gitlab's very public meltdown has been mostly recovered now. If there is one thing we can learn from this incident, it's the importance of proper naming conventions. The person responsible for the mistake intended to operate on "db2.cluster.gitlab.com", but accidentally wiped "db1.cluster.gitlab.com" instead.

What naming conventions do Slashdot readers use and have you experienced any similar failures?

Submission + - Spike of radioactive Iodine levels is detected in Europe (theaviationist.com)

schwit1 writes: Iodine-131 (131I), a radionuclide of anthropogenic origin, has recently been detected in tiny amounts in the ground-level atmosphere in Europe. The preliminary report states it was first found during week 2 of January 2017 in northern Norway. Iodine-131 was also detected in Finland, Poland, Czech Republic, Germany, France and Spain, until the end of January.

However, no one seems to know the reason behind the released Iodine-131. Along with nuclear power plants, the isotope is also widely used in medicine and its presence in the air could be the effect of several different incidents.

Or, as someone speculates, it could have been the side effect of a test of a new nuclear warhead in Russia: an unlikely (considered the ability to detect nuke tests through satellites and seismic detectors) violation of Nuclear Test Ban Treaty.

Submission + - Norwegian cyber command warns against supply chain security risks in F35 project (safecontrols.blog)

hrdo writes: The commander of the Norwegian CYFOR (a branch of the military) held a speach Monday night in Oslo where he warned that large military projects like the F35 fighter jet project can be threatened by attacks on the supply chain. The warnings follow several media stories about security breaches due to outsourcing and lack of controls. In one case an Indian IT company was contracted to operate the emergency communications network for Norwegian police, ambulances and fire departments — without security clearances or background checks.

The general should keep preaching security to his peers, not only within his own organization and on the battle field, but also in the procurement trenches. The initianl penetration of advanced persistent threats targeting high-security organizations is tyically coming via a less secure supply chain partner. Still, coordinated security management in large projects remains a fantacy in most cases.

Submission + - PHP Is First Language To Add "Modern" Cryptography Library To Its Core (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The PHP team has unanimously voted to integrate the Libsodium library in the PHP core, and by doing so, becoming the first programming language to support a modern cryptography library by default. Developers approved a proposal with a vote of 37 to 0 and decided that Libsodium will be added to the upcoming PHP 7.2 release that will be launched towards the end of 2017.

Scott Arciszewski, the cryptography expert who made the proposal says that by supporting modern crypto in the PHP core, the PHP team will force the WordPress team to implement better security in its CMS, something they avoided until now. Additionally, it will allow PHP and CMS developers to add advanced cryptography features to their apps that run on shared hosting providers, where until now they weren't able to install custom PHP extensions to support modern cryptography. Other reasons on why he made the proposal are detailed in depth here.

Arciszewski also says that PHP is actually "the first" programming language to support a "modern" cryptography library in its core, despite Erlang and Go including similar libraries, which he claims are not as powerful and up-to-date as PHP's upcoming Libsodium implementation.

Submission + - SPAM: Scottish court awards damages for CCTV camera pointed at neighbour's house

AmiMoJo writes: Edinburgh's Nahid Akram installed a CCTV system that let him record his downstairs neighbours Debbie and Tony Woolley in their back garden, capturing both images and audio of their private conversations, with a system that had the capacity to record continuously for five days. A Scottish court has ruled that the distress caused by their neighbour's camera entitled the Woolleys to £17,000 in damages, without the need for them to demonstrate any actual financial loss. The judgment builds on a 2015 English court ruling against Google for spying on logged out Safari users, where the users were not required to show financial losses to receive compensation for private surveillance.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Astronomers discover 60 new planets including 'super Earth' (nypost.com)

schwit1 writes:

An international team of astronomers has found 60 new planets orbiting stars close to Earth’s solar system, including a rocky “super Earth.”

The experts also found evidence of an additional 54 planets, bringing the potential discovery of new worlds to 114.

One planet in particular, Gliese 411b, has been generating plenty of attention. Described as a “hot super Earth with a rocky surface,” Gliese 411b is located in the fourth-nearest star system to the Sun, making it the third-nearest planetary system to the Sun, according to the U.K.’s University of Hertfordshire, which participated in the research. Gliese 411b (also known as GJ 411b or Lalande 21185) orbits the star Gliese 411 (or GJ 411).

Despite the “super Earth” label, Dr. Mikko Tuomi from University of Hertfordshire’s Centre for Astrophysics told Fox News that Gliese 411b is too hot for life to exist on its surface.


Submission + - Nearly 56,000 bridges called structurally deficient (usatoday.com)

schwit1 writes:

More than one in four bridges (173,919) are at least 50 years old and have never had major reconstruction work, according to the ARTBA analysis. State transportation officials have identified 13,000 bridges along interstates that need replacement, widening or major reconstruction, according to the group.

“America’s highway network is woefully underperforming,” said Alison Premo Black, the group’s chief economics who conducted the analysis. “It is outdated, overused, underfunded and in desperate need of modernization.”


Submission + - Utilities Vote To Close Largest Coal Plant In Western US (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: At 2.25 gigawatts, Arizona’s Navajo Generating Station is the biggest coal-burning power plant in the Western US. The plant, and the nearby Kayenta coal mine that feeds it, are located on the Navajo Indian Reservation, and the Navajo and Hopi peoples have had a conflicted relationship with coal since the plant opened in the 1970s. Almost all the 900-plus jobs at the mine and plant are held by Native Americans, and the tribes receive royalties to account for large portions of their budget. Negotiations were underway to improve the tribes’ lease terms, which expire in 2019. But on Monday, the four utilities that own most of the plant voted to close it at the end of 2019. They decided that the plant’s coal-powered electricity just can’t compete with plants burning natural gas. A press release from Salt River Projects, which runs the plant, explained, “The decision by the utility owners of [Navajo Generating Station] is based on the rapidly changing economics of the energy industry, which has seen natural gas prices sink to record lows and become a viable long-term and economical alternative to coal power.”

Submission + - United States has slipped to its lowest level in rankings of economic Freedom (thehill.com)

schwit1 writes: In the latest report, the U.S. ranks 17th out of 180 countries with an economic freedom score of 75.1 out of 100. Last year, the U.S. ranked number 11.

Hong Kong, Singapore and New Zealand topped the list, with respective scores of 89.8, 88.6 and 83.7. Other countries that placed ahead of the U.S. included Canada, Taiwan and Britain, among others.

The Heritage report said countries with scores between 80-100 are considered economically “free,” while countries scores between 70-79.9 are considered “mostly free.”

Are we now the "Land of the mostly free"?

Submission + - Security Teams Are Becoming Cyber Espionage Investigators

Trailrunner7 writes: As cyber espionage has moved from the government sector into the corporate world, enterprise security professionals have found themselves needing to become investigators to deal with the threat. But without real expertise and experience with investigations, even the best security teams can miss serious compromises in their environments.

“Cybersecurity professionals don’t have experience dealing with traditional investigations. These cases are complex because you often don’t have the data you need to tell the story. We need to find a way to help companies characterize what’s going on. It’s a problem we haven’t really thought about for a long time,” Milan Patel, a former FBI cyber investigator and current managing director of cyber investigation and incident response at K2 Intelligence said during a panel discussion on cyber espionage at the RSA Conference here Wednesday.

In one recent case, Patel was called in to a large real estate company to investigate an administrator who had given himself extra network privileges. The admin then got access to the Exchange server and began reading emails sent by the company’s executive team. During the investigation, Patel discovered that several other people had unnecessary elevated privileges, but the firm didn’t have a way to track when the employees had gotten those rights or how. The company also didn’t have any way to do forensics on the employee’s laptop or phone.

Slashdot Top Deals

Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself.

Working...