Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - US tries to shift blame to China on Cyberespionage, again ! (

An anonymous reader writes: Under the intense heat of the NSA disclosure ( Side news: Snowden gonna appear on British TV to deliver the "alternative Christmas message" ) the United States of America is trying to shift the focus away from itself and blames China for all cyber crimes that have taken place.

US congressman Mike Rogers, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, told members of the European Parliament in Brussels last week that if the European Union continued "the confusion and the muddling of the debate" on the US snooping on European citizens and institutions, it may help China absolutely steal us blind when it comes to intellectual property of European and American companies "

Submission + - Police raids German Pirate Party's servers ( 4

thetinytoon writes: The servers of the german pirate party have been raided and taken offline by the german police, after the french police asked the german officials for help in a lawcase. According to a police' spokesman, the case is not targeting the Pirate Party itself and that they cannot disclose any further details at this time.

Interesting bit is: If the german Pirate Party itself or a member of the party is not the target of the investigation, why did the police take down a complete democratic party's infrastructure?

Hashtag for followers of the events is already there: #servergate.

Comment Misleading! (Score 2) 171

Here you can read why: Don't get too excited about this ECJ ruling on internetfiltering , firstly it isn't a ruling, secondly it doesn't outlaw web-blocking. In other words; it's all up to the individual EU memberstates now. What i think will happen, is that France & the UK will start the nasty .biz followed by a lobbying campaign in Brussels for EU ( legislative )"harmonization" since this is how most nasty laws are passed.

Submission + - Turing Papers Saved For Bletchley Park (

judgecorp writes: "Alan Turing's papers have been saved, and will be held at the Bletchley Park site where he performed his wartime code-breaking work, which is now a museum.

When the papers came up for auction last year, a campaign to buy them fell short of the reserve price, but the papers have now been bought with the help of lottery money"


Submission + - The Outfall of a Helium-3 Crisis (

astroengine writes: "The United States is currently recovering from a helium isotope crisis that last year sent low-temperature physicists scrambling, sky-rocketed the cost of hospital MRI’s, and threw national security staff out on a search mission for alternate ways to detect dirty bombs. Now the panic is subsiding, what is being done to conserve, or replace, helium-3?"

Submission + - Facebook Develops HTML5 Gaming Benchmark (

An anonymous reader writes: A couple of Facebook engineers are developing an HTML5 gaming benchmark. They write, 'Two weeks ago Bruce and I released JSGameBench version 0.1. Today marks the release of version 0.2, a much faster and cleaner version. We continue to learn both from tightening the code and from the strong HTML5 community. Version 0.2 reinforces our belief in HTML5 as a strong, horizontal platform for games and highly interactive applications across the web.'

Submission + - New SHA Functions Boost Crypto on 64-bit Chips (

An anonymous reader writes: The National Institute of Standards and Technology, guardian of America's cryptography standards, has announced a new extension to the SHA-2 hashing algorithm family that promises to boost performance on modern chips. Announced this week, two new standards — SHA-512/224 and SHA-512/256 — have been created to directly replace the SHA-224 and SHA-256 standards. They take advantage of the speed improvements inherent in SHA-512 on 64-bit processors to produce checksums more rapidly than their predecessors — but truncate them at a shorter length, reducing the overall timespan and complexity of the digest.

Submission + - Microsoft Bans Open Source From The Windows Market ( 1

Blacklaw writes: Microsoft has raised the ire of the open source community with its Windows Marketplace licence by specifically refusing to allow software covered under an open licence to be distributed. The licence, which anyone wishing to distribute Windows, Windows Phone, or Xbox applications through the company's copy of Apple's App Store is required to agree to, is the usual torrent of legalese — but hides a nasty surprise for those who support open source ideals.

Submission + - Foreign hackers attack Canadian Government (

An anonymous reader writes: "An unprecedented cyberattack on the Canadian government from China has given foreign hackers access to highly classified federal information, and forced at least two key departments off the internet, CBC News has learned.

The attack, first detected in early January, left Canadian counter-espionage agents scrambling to determine how much sensitive government information may have been stolen and by whom."

Should note that our Auditor-General warned of this months ago and was ignored by everyone as she usually is. Should also note that public sentiment towards China is getting very, very testy.


Submission + - Researchers: 100% Green Energy Possible By 2050 (

thecarchik writes: Researchers from Stanford University and the University of California-Davis published their analysis in the journal Energy Policy. The main challenges, say the authors, will be summoning the global will to make the conversion.

There are no technological or economic barriers to converting the entire world to clean, renewable energy sources, said author Mark Jacobson, a Stanford professor, saying it is only a question of "whether we have the societal and political will."

During this decade, the two "fuels of the future" will be electricity and gasoline. Beyond that, we can't project.


Submission + - Google Announces One Pass Payment System (

eldavojohn writes: Riding the tail of Apple's 30% announcement, Google's Eric Schmidt has announced One Pass, a new method for users to pay for content. The BBC is reporting that Google is taking a 10% cut. One Pass will work on Google sites and on phones and tablets as the announcement notes: 'Readers who purchase from a One Pass publisher can access their content on tablets, smartphones and websites using a single sign-on with an email and password. Importantly, the service helps publishers authenticate existing subscribers so that readers don't have to re-subscribe in order to access their content on new devices.' This is to be handled through Google Checkout.

German High Court Declares All Software Patentable 330

FlorianMueller writes "Long gone are the times when Europe was that bastion of resistance against software patents and patents on such things as file systems were ruled invalid. In a decision published today, the Federal Court of Justice of Germany upheld a patent on the automatic generation of structured documents (such as XML/HTML) in a client-server setting. The ruling lays out general principles that go beyond the patent at stake: they tear down all barriers to software patentability in the largest EU member state, even though a European patent treaty has been adopted that was intended to exclude software from the scope of patentable subject matter. EU patent examiners recently warned against a drift toward software patents. Software patent critics in Europe fear this will spark more litigation on their continent and increasingly call for defensive measures."

Slashdot Top Deals

It's later than you think, the joint Russian-American space mission has already begun.