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Submission + - Farthest Galaxy Yet Revealed by Cosmic Lens (space.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Space.com has an article on the Hubble and Spitzer telescopes spotting the oldest (or youngest at the time?) galaxy yet, viewed when it was only 500 million years old. Question is, if the frame of reference was actually at that location looking back home here at the the Milky Way, wouldn't we seem as if we were the oldest (or youngest) Galaxy being nearly 13.2 billion light years away? And couldn't we peer even further back to see older galaxies if we were at that point in space and looked further back in that direction?

Submission + - US doctors back circumcision (nature.com) 2

ananyo writes: "On 27 August, a report by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) concludes for the first time that, overall, boys will be healthier if circumcised. The report says that although the choice is ultimately up to parents, medical insurance should pay for the procedure. The recommendation, coming from such an influential body, could boost US circumcision rates, which, at 55%, are already higher than much of the developed world. The researchers estimate that each circumcision that is not performed costs the US health-care system US$313."

Submission + - Samsung is prepared for the worst, says it will modify phones to avoid Apple ban (bgr.com)

zacharye writes: Samsung on Tuesday confirmed that it is willing to modify its smartphones if it cannot successfully fight Apple’s request to have them banned in the United States. After managing a big win in its trial against Samsung, Apple made an initial request with the U.S. District Court in San Jose, California to ban eight smartphones including the Galaxy S II. Samsung plans to fight the request but if the company is unsuccessful, it confirmed that it is willing to modify the devices in order to avoid sales bans...

Submission + - Touch in Cars Is Still Too Complicated (conceivablytech.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: I do not recall anyone ever complaining about the iOS interface and there have been plenty of attempts to replicate the experience and its flow of control. When we first saw the iOS interface on the iPhone, the interface felt natural and just right, effortlessly. iOS has worked flawlessly for the iPad as well: An extremely easy to use and intuitive user interface for occasionally highly complex tasks. As simple as iOS may appear on the surface, it is incredibly well-executed balance that matches the requirements of a touch interface for phones, tablets and other horizontal screen devices. Changing the user scenario, hardware, or software will alter the requirements for the desired user experience as well. Cadillac’s CUE in-car entertainment system is the best effort to translate “touch” in cars yet, but it’s not perfect yet. Here are our initial impressions after a week with the Cadillac XTS.

Submission + - Demonoid Domains name for sale (pcmag.com)

Pax681 writes: PC World and other sites are reporting of the death of Demonoid "Bad news for those expecting the BitTorrent site Demonoid to somehow spring up from the ashes after last week's alleged bust. The Demonoid domain names are now officially for sale via Sedo, the final nail in the coffin for the popular site that was taken down via a combined assault from the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry and Interpol. "
Would it be fair to assume that the week long DDOS was part of the operation to take the site down? and if so does thing signal that the *IAA's now see it as ok to break the law witha DDOS to enforce their copyright? http://torrentfreak.com/demonoid-domains-go-up-for-sale-120812/ http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57491730-93/domains-seized-from-demonoid-bittorrent-site-up-for-sale/


Submission + - FDA: Software Failure Behind 24% Of Medical Device Recalls (threatpost.com)

chicksdaddy writes: "Software failures were behind 24 percent of all the medical device recalls in 2011, according to data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories (OSEL).
The absence of solid architecture and "principled engineering practices" in software development affects a wide range of medical devices, with potentially life-threatening consequences, the FDA warned. In response, FDA told Threatpost that it is developing tools to disassemble and test medical device software and locate security problems and weak design."

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