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Submission + - Neuroscience Explains Why You Can't Lose Weight on a Diet

AmiMoJo writes: According to a new study, the chance of an obese person attaining normal body weight is 1 in 210 for men and 1 in 124 for women, worsening to 1 in 1,290 for men and 1 in 677 for women with severe obesity, suggesting that current weight management programs focused on dieting and exercise are not effective in tackling obesity.

Neuroscientist Sandra Aamodt writes in The New York Times that in the long run dieting is rarely effective, doesn't reliably improve health and does more harm than good and according to Aamodt, the root of the problem is not willpower but neuroscience. Metabolic suppression is one of several powerful tools that the brain uses to keep the body within a certain weight range, called the set point. The range, which varies from person to person, is determined by genes and life experience.

Submission + - FCC Approves Charter's Acquisition of Time Warner Cable (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The FCC has approved Charter's acquisition of Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks. The approval comes with conditions that are believed to include not allowing the combined company to impose internet data caps for seven years and requiring them to provide low-cost internet access to low-income families for a period of four years. The combined company will be the second largest cable company in the United States, with only about 2.6 million fewer subscribers than Comcast. The FCC approval comes on the heels of the Department of Justice approving the merger. Although the California Public Utilities Commission has yet to vote on the merger, that is likely to happen on May 12, and already has a recommendation for approval. The Christian Science Monitor has provided good analysis of the impacts of the merger on consumers.

Submission + - Neuroscience Explains Why You Can't Lose Weight on a Diet

HughPickens.com writes: According to a new study, the chance of an obese person attaining normal body weight is 1 in 210 for men and 1 in 124 for women, increasing to 1 in 1,290 for men and 1 in 677 for women with severe obesity, suggesting that current weight management programs focused on dieting and exercise are not effective in tackling obesity. Now Neuroscientist Sandra Aamodt writes in the NY Times that in the long run dieting is rarely effective, doesn’t reliably improve health and does more harm than good and according to Aamodt, the root of the problem is not willpower but neuroscience. Metabolic suppression is one of several powerful tools that the brain uses to keep the body within a certain weight range, called the set point. The range, which varies from person to person, is determined by genes and life experience. When dieters’ weight drops below it, they not only burn fewer calories but also produce more hunger-inducing hormones and find eating more rewarding. If someone starts at 120 pounds and drops to 80, her brain rightfully declares a starvation state of emergency, using every method available to get that weight back up to normal. This coordinated brain response is a major reason that dieters find weight loss so hard to achieve and maintain. According to Aamodt dieting can actually lead to weight gain because dieting is stressful. Calorie restriction produces stress hormones, which act on fat cells to increase the amount of abdominal fat. Such fat is associated with medical problems like diabetes and heart disease, regardless of overall weight.

If dieting doesn’t work, what should we do instead? Aamodt recommends mindful eating — paying attention to signals of hunger and fullness, without judgment, to relearn how to eat only as much as the brain’s weight-regulation system commands. In mindful eating, eating slowly and genuinely relishing each bite could be the remedy for a fast-paced for our dieting obsession in which an endless parade of new diets never seems to slow a stampede toward obesity. "I finally gave up dieting six years ago, and I’m much happier," concludes Aamodt. "I redirected the energy I used to spend on dieting to establishing daily habits of exercise and meditation. I also enjoy food more while worrying about it less, now that it no longer comes with a side order of shame."

Comment Re:We don't want data caps. (Score 2) 148

That was a tongue in cheek comment, since at some level *all* data is metered.
But the economics are quite different now than they were a few years ago.
Hosting that used to cost $10,000 a month because of transfers can now be had for less than $100 or $200.

We're talking about residential broadband here, and the incumbent Cable TV firms that are providing that badly want to protect their
expensive traditional Cable TV service which many people don't see as necessary anymore.
We want to stream what we want when we want.
We don't care that something is aired at 8PM on Tuesday, and we want to FF the commercials.
The data caps are to hamstring that. They will not be successful, in a little while.

Comment Re:Assumptions (Score 1) 78

I found out that my prescription records were stored in Milliman Intelliscript
milliman.com
I was entitled to a report of their data.
I got it, with a FCRA Summary.pdf document, since this falls under the fair credit reporting act.

They got it from my previous health insurance company. You know, they have that 17 page fine print clickthrough agreement that no one can read.

I applied for health insurance, and a nurse from the company I applied to called me and discussed everything ad nauseum, until I finally hung up and refused to buy the insurance.
It was like they were afraid if they signed me up they might have to pay for a prescription or something. That should be just illegal.

Comment Re:Not exactly a hack (Score 1) 78

I heard where pharmacies are sharing prescription data with each other and with doctors to stop people from going from doctor to doctor to get more meds. More prescriptions than any one doctor would let one patient have. It might be required by law in my state.

It's all pretty ridiculous, anyway. Doctors ask like they give you 30 pills instead of 100 (which might cost the same under a particular pharmacy generic program) they are protecting you, like they don't trust you, the patient. But they do trust you, not to take the whole bottle at once.

So what's the point?

Comment Re:Has to be worse? (Score 2) 82

Well, I'll take a stab at it.

TWC and Comcast were two companies that offered the same product in completely different markets. In terms of their affect on the market, they would have had more power over, say, publishers (ie the TV networks), but no more power over, say, home Internet/Cable/Telephone prices than they did before, as the amount of competition in each area would have been unchanged.

While your attempt was noble, this is completely wrong. Both are already monopolies in 90%+ of their market areas. But at least now people can complain that the "other one" is only charging xyz for service in the next town over. IF the merger had gone through the "new" company would just raise prices and lower service EVERYWHERE...

You completely misunderstood, the parent was saying that Directv and ATT were competing, not TWC and Comcast. For consumers, TWC and Comcast do not compete. Whereas today, if AT&T Uverse TV rips you off you can dump them for DirecTV, who will then rip you off instead.
If the merger goes through you won't be able to switch providers, or the ripoff will be computer coordinated to continue. They have rules and filters set up to do that.

Submission + - LinkedIN Reference Search is legal, but it shouldn't be. (google.com)

ciscoguy01 writes: LinkedIN has a paid product "Reference Search" which allows subscribers to search to find someone who worked at a company at the same time as another person, with the idea that you might be able to get a reference from someone it finds.
Tracee Sweet applied for a job, got an offer, then when the employer used the Reference Search to check her out with previous co-workers rescinded the offer.
She sued LinkedIN saying that the LinkedIN product should fall under the FCRA (Fair Credit Reporting Act) and she should have had the right to review and challenge information there as if it were a credit report. She lost in court last week.
The issue here is this: Anyone can create any number of LinkedIN accounts, can put any employment history in that account, this is not verified by anyone.
The Fair Credit Reporting Act protects consumers from information that may affect credit decisions, employment decisions and more when compiled by a credit reporting agency. Which today LinkedIN is not. But should they be?
Nothing would stop anyone from creating as many accounts on LinkedIN as they want with completely fabricated information in it, for the purpose of having the references there returned by the LinkedIN paid subscriber "Reference Search" Tool.
At the moment LinkedIn Reference Search is legal. But since it can easily contain wholly unverified and possibly forged or otherwise fake information, should it be? Shouldn't someone be responsible for information about *YOU* contained in a database and then being sold for profit?

Comment Re:Come on already (Score 1) 64

Put OpenWrt on it and problem over.

OpenWrt is not without it's issues.
It's not a panacea. Unless you need a package that has been implemented on that platform.
If you do, OpenWrt is appropriate.
DDWrt might be slightly easier to configure, but certainly not without it's own problems.
But other platforms are better for average home users. Easier to use.
Man, so many people get glazed looks when asked to make a change to even a simple home router. They are so simple!
When the guy from the cable company did my install and I made the few little changes that needed to be made, his eyes opened wide that I knew how to do that!
He seemed shocked.

Comment Re:dsl2741b firmware (Score 1) 64

old sff pc with two gigabit nics and a separate switch.. Install linux or bsd of your choice and configure, or use distros tailored to the purpose like zeroshell or m0n0wall.

Uh, right. Now that makes no sense at all for most people.
Zynos is not bad, just turn off remote administration if you don't need it.
If you *do* need remote admin, make sure to establish a good username and pw.

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