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Comment Re:Yes, that's why I tell them (Score 2) 55

You're living in Europe, right? In the USA, a different kind of capitalism rules, and there are quite a few dystopian scenarios that I can come up with, if that kind of monitoring is not strictly regulated by privacy laws. On a company wide level, the aggregate health level becomes another key performance indicator. Your employed can and will analyze just how sick their workforce can be before productivity drops. Workload can now be increased and work conditions / safety standards lowered until that sweet spot is reached where profit is maximized. On an individual level, your biodata can not only show if you're sick, it can also calculate the risk of you becoming sick, or maybe even predict it. That is very convenient. If your employer knows you're going go drop out of work in two weeks, the human resources department has enough time to hire a replacement for you, and fire you just in time your absence might cause them a loss in productivity. On top of that, your health data will likely not be collected by your employer, but by some kind of third party. And not only will they closely cooperate with anyone else with who is interested in putting a score on your health (foremost your insurances), but also future employers. Which will of course mean, that this will primarily hit poor workers, who can't afford the best healthcare. And I could go on like that. Maybe I should write a novel :) Worst case:

Comment Re:Don't forget about the War on Drugs. (Score 1) 432

A lot of medication takes up to three weeks to show any effect, and sudden changes in dosage can wreak havoc on your neurochemistry, and possibly make things much, much worse. Also, in case of clinical depression for example, you want to prevent the next episode. When it's already there (and that come very quickly), and you're already standing on the bridge ready to jump, so to speak, it's unlikely you're going to be motivated to take your medicine. There's a joke that goes, "There's that new book "The power of positive thinking". I didn't buy it, because what would that be good for.". That sounds funny, but captures a depressive mindset rather well.

Comment Could A 'Smart Firewall' Protect IoT Devices? (Score 1) 230

Could A 'Smart Firewall' Protect IoT Devices? No. "Smart" firewalls are in fact the problem. Getting rid of them, and using regular non-smart firewalls that only allow incoming connections when you explicitly and manually configured them to do so can protect your IoT devices.

Comment Nothing to see here, move along. (Score 3, Insightful) 186

The terms of service are almost identical to those of, for example, Steam. Which is also "always on" by default. And nobody seems to have a problem with it. So could we please be rational, and stop pretending that Oculus is doing anything special here? And a lot of clauses highlighted in the article are pure boilerplate, and actually required for the service being allowed to publish, for example, your reviews or your screenshots. Yes, you can raise privacy concerns, but you would have to do so against any software storefront that lives in your system tray. This is worth discussing, but it is definitely nothing "Super Shady". And if you want to put on your HMD, and instantly see your home screen (or hit the xbox button on your controller), there needs to be some background service watching. The same goes for notifications / multiplayer invites / chat requests. You don't want that? Go to System Settings/Administrative Tools/Services, select "Oculus VR Runtime" and hit "stop". There, it's gone.

Comment We have already answered the question. (Score 2) 162

Apparently it's perfectly fine to send killer robots to murder random unwanted people around the globe at the command of a single person with no parliamental control, no charges, no sentence, no judges, no jury, no defense and against all governing international laws. But serving alcohol to its owner is a problem because, oh my god, it might not be healthy? ARE YOU FUCKING KIDDING ME?

Comment Re:Who are you? I'm bat- er, ANON! (Score 5, Interesting) 413

No, it's not. The slippery slope is where the legal definition got extended so much beyond the clinical definition that it no longer makes any sense by any rational criteria in an alarming number of cases it is applied to. Before we go out on the street and call for a witch hunt, the common definition of "pedophilia" needs to be reformed, so that it again means actual child abuse, and neither "12 year old boys discover their sexuality like everyone else did during puperty" nor "17 year old girlfriend sends naughty pictures to 18 year old boyfriend" or any completely normal, consensual and non-threatening behaviour in between. Free those resources to fight actual child abuse, and we don't need self-appointed trigger happy internet superheroes with torches and pitchforks who think who need to take the law into their own hands.

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