Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment What a load of crap (Score 2) 371

My brother runs the recycling facility for Waste Management out of Port of Tacoma. It serves most of the northwest area. They are making money hand over fist. He says that WM is expanding it's recycling business, not shrinking it.

Comment Re:Umm ... (Score 1) 51

OK, so our company's software IS what you define as COTS. It's in production use by a number of commercial entities such as BP, Deuchebank, General Motors, Wells Fargo, etc. By your definition we shouldn't have any trouble with the feds about offshore development. That being said, the vast majority of accounts require some customization to fit the customers' needs (similar to the way most databases require customization for customers' use: creating tables, developing procedure code, etc.) This is all done within the product's development environment (none of the core source code is touched) and all customization work is done by cleared personel.

Comment Re:Umm ... (Score 3, Informative) 51

Our software does data integration. While the software itself manages sensitive information, there's no sensitive information in the source code. I fail to see how letting foreign nationals develop open source software is somehow more secure than letting them develop ours. I don't believe the concern is letting DoD employees contribute to open source. I believe the concern is allowing foreign nationals to insert malicious code into software that is used at the DoD.

Comment Re:Interesting (Score 1) 259

Actually, a LOT of people I know who have iPhones have this same complaint. Don't get me wrong, I love the iPhone and the lack of these features was not enough to prevent me from getting one. It's just that it would have made the product that much better to have it.

Slashdot Top Deals

When speculation has done its worst, two plus two still equals four. -- S. Johnson