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Comment Re:Uh... (Score 2) 62

I'm not sure you should.
I search Google for "phones", and the first ad that comes up is a refurb iPhone 6 from Telus. In fact, there are 6 ads: 3 of them for various iPhone products, and 3 for Samsung Galaxy products.
Then, the organic listings are for various carriers, plus the big box stores that sell phones. Nowhere on the entire first page do I see the word "pixel."
For "watches" I see ads for "Call It Spring" (WTF kind of name is that for a watch company?), Timex, Ashford, Rosefield. Organic listings again are department stores, some big box stores, and a couple of traditional manufacturer listings. No Google watches on the entire first page.
"Smoke detector" gives me a similar result: Ads for Kidde, First Alert, and organic listings for Home Depot, Consumer Reports, the wikipedia article on smoke detectors, and others.
Although this page does list Nest, it's not in an ad, and it's not until the 7th organic listing: an ArsTechnica article called "Life with the Nest Protect: Are “smart” smoke detectors a dumb idea?"

That doesn't sound like Google promoting their products at all.

Maybe it's stores in the NYC area that are buying ads trying to sell this shit to the area yuppies and millennials that just have to buy the next big thing, and have more money than brains. But then, the WSJ might just not understand how the Internet, Google, and geolocating works, and manages to completely screw up their reporting as a result, like happens too frequently with traditional media companies...

Comment Re:Better equation (Score 1) 76

"Does no one else think cars + computers + network connectivity = bad?"

Nope. Tesla was able to patch all their cars quickly, without asking drivers to come in to get serviced.

  That's a net gain of: thousands of kms saved + time saved + less cars on road = good

 

You're making the assumption that only legitimate researchers who follow proper notification procedures are looking for this stuff. Hackers looking to take advantage of it are looking, too, but they won't tell Tesla (or whatever relevant manufacturer) if they find anything.
What happens if some genius security researcher with a mental instability (we know they exist) gets recruited by Daesh, and figures out how to lock up the brakes on every Tesla that's travelling faster than 50 mph with a GPS location that puts it on a freeway? Do you really think "Well, Tesla would have been able to update the firmware over the air to prevent it, if only those miserable hackers had told them about it instead of causing thousands of car crashes around the world," is going to be comforting to anybody who's been run over by a transport truck as a result?

I know, the chances of the incompetent twits that comprise Daesh actually accomplishing anything like this are slim to none, but there are smart hacker groups out there looking at this, and how much do you think Putin would pay to see a whole bunch of high end American cars cause huge amounts of chaos on American roads where thousands of cars (or more) get in pileups on the freeways across the country within a span of 5 minutes?

Comment Re:Google Scam Department is setious business (Score 2) 105

If they had a clear case, they wouldn't spend the money and time on the publicity surrounding the case and their inability to protect their brand.

Or maybe they spend the money on publicity so that people realize that "Sharon, your local Google rep" isn't actually from Google, and that if you hire these people it can severely screw up your Google rankings, rather than helping. There's nothing wrong with educating people.

Comment Re:Widely Used!!!! (Score 1) 446

Not a right and diminishes those freedoms that are by attempting to twist rights to fit your agenda rather than having it codifed, like a coward.

Privacy is not a right? WTF? I suppose if you're in North Korea, maybe Venezuela, and a few other dictatorships, then no.
But that "right to be secure in papers and effects" (paraphrased, as I'm not looking up the exact wording, considering I'm not even American) means it's your right to keep them private, as much as it's your right to not have them arbitrarily seized by the authorities.

Comment Re:Islam is the problem, not encryption (Score 1) 446

14,000 god fearing americans killed by other god fearing americans every year for the last 100 years or more. More Americans have been murdered with a gun since WWII than were killed in WWII.

So, it's OK to assume every American is a God fearing, murderous gun nut, but it's not OK to assume every Muslim is a jihad-waging, terrorist psychopath? OK. Nice double standard you've got there.

Christianity is objectively worse because it preaches one things, and does the opposite.

So, all you've done is prove that there are some Christians who are hypocritical, just like you.

Comment Re:Untouchable criminal (Score 1) 265

What is just as bad is Trump is encouraging a foreign government to intervene and help him win the election. That is so far beyond the pale as to be totally unforgiveable and instantly disqualifying.

Did you actually listen to the speech where he said this, or just your Democratic Information Masters? It's blatantly obvious it's totally tongue in cheek if you actually listen to it. Trump says a lot of stupid stuff; why don't you attack the stuff that he's serious about, rather than jokes?

Comment Re:Who cares..?? (Score 1) 704

What the hell does number of deaths on each side have to do with anything? If 12 idiots with dull machetes attack 2 guys with AR-15s, the most the idiots can kill is 2. The most the 2 guys can kill is 12. Is it the 2 guys' fault that they get attacked by idiots with primitive weapons and a death wish?

Comment Re:Hypocrisy at its best (Score 1) 30

Person's location: Starbuck's on 7th Street.
Person's name: John Smith.

But Starbucks has started banning IPs associated with hacking and child pornography.

I suspect due to your knowledge of the subject, you are a pervert.

Errr....what? Did you even read what I posted?
How does Starbucks ban 192.168.3.192, when it's on their internal network? I mean all 35 people in the coffee shop are going to share a single public IP address. If it's been "associated with hacking and child pornography," as you put it, then Starbucks is going to start banning themselves. That makes no sense.

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