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Comment Re:FP16 isn't even meant for computation (Score 1) 55

So, one problem is that there is not always more data. In my field, we have a surplus of some sorts of data, but other data requires hundreds of thousands of hours of human input, and we only have so much of that to go around. Processing all of that is easy enough, getting more is not.

Also, by "effective", I should have made it clear that I meant "an effective overall solution to the problem", which includes all costs of training a wider, lower-precision network. This includes input data collection, storage and processing, all of the custom software to handle this odd floating point format, including FP16-specific test code and documentation, run time server costs and latency, any increased risks introduced by using code paths in training and , etc.

I'm not saying that I don't believe it's possible, I've just seen absolutely no evidence that this is a significant win in most or even a sizable fraction of cases, or that it represents a "best practice" in the field. Our own experiments have shown a severe degradation in performance when using these nets w/out a complete retraining, the software engineering costs will be nontrivial, and much of the hardware we are forced to run on does not even support this functionality.

As an analog, when we use integer based nets and switch between 16-bit and 8-bit integers, we see an unacceptable level of degradation, even though there is a modest speedup and we can use slightly larger neural nets. I'm very wary of anything with a mantissa much smaller than 16 bits for that reason--those few bits seem to make a significant difference, at least for what we're doing. We're solving a very difficult constrained optimization problem using markov chains in real time, and if the observational features are lower fidelity, the optimization search will run out of time to explore the search space effectively before the result is returned to the rest of the system. It's possible that the sensitivity of our optimization algorithm to input quality is the issue here, not the fundamental usefulness of FP16, but I'm still quite skeptical. If this were a "slam dunk", I'd expect to see it move through the literature in a wave like the Restricted Boltzmann Machine did.

Oh, and thank you for the like (great reading) and the thoughtful reply. Not always easy to find on niche topics online.

Comment Re:Exploitative by design? (Score 1) 153

It seems like these systems are exploitative by design, even if exploitation wasn't explicitly the goal. They're designed with every possible algorithm and available data to maximize labor output at the lowest possible cost. Individual workers are operating at extreme information asymmetry and against a system which does not negotiate and only offers a take it or leave it choice.

This is by far the best comment I've ever seen regarding this sort of algorithmic labor management.

Normally I'm all for this sort of thing--my company is a client and uses it to handle large bursts of data processing quickly--but the information symmetry argument is a powerful one. Also, there doesn't seem to be a lot of competition in this space, which might otherwise ameliorate a lot of the problems induced by the "take it or leave it" bargaining approach.

The analysis provided by the article is absurd, but yours seems to lead to the inescapable conclusion that some kind of regulation is necessary to prevent blatant exploitation. Maybe just reducing information asymmetry in some way, or requiring transparency in reports available to the public on the website regarding effective wages paid to workers as a fraction of the minimum and average wages of employees in their respective countries. Surely someone can find an answer to this.

Comment Re:FP16 isn't even meant for computation (Score 1) 55

Accidentally posted as anonymous coward, reposting under my actual name.

So they're all excited about the lowest-precision, smallest-size floating point math in IEEE 754?

FP16 is good enough for neural nets. Do you really think the output voltage of a biological neurons has 32 bits of precision and range? For any given speed, FP16 allows you to run NNs that are wider and deeper, and/or to use bigger datasets That is way more important than the precision of individual operations.

There's a lot of rounding error with FP16. The neural networks I use are 16-bit integers, which work much, much better, at least for the work I'm doing. Also, do you have a good citation that FP16 neural networks are, overall, more effective than FP32 networks, as you've described?

Comment I worked on this a bit (Score 5, Interesting) 109

In 2005 I was a sysadmin at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory headquarters in Madison, Wisconsin. Biggest project I worked on was porting RS 485 serial drivers from a legacy unix system to Linux 2.6 and setting up the HP rack servers which we then shipped down to the pole from New Zealand on a C-130 Hercules. Also, I built a data visualization system in python+django which ran over a 1km-long DSL network between the drilling site and the south pole base. Never got to down there myself (my FTE boss did), but it was a fun project for a student and looks good on the resume and all. Did I mention SSH connections over satellite to Antarctica are pretty slow?

Comment Re:Yuck (Score 1) 440

Read the guy's blog. He eats "normal" food on social occasions, or when he just feels like experiencing a certain taste. Soylent is just supposed to be about the vast majority of meals you eat where it's just about fueling your body so you can get on with more important things.

Comment Re:Docking with the International Space Station? (Score 1) 44

Orbital and SpaceX could easily take their craft in for docking themselves, but NASA's rules require them to do it this way. NASA's rules are that nobody is allowed to put something on a trajectory that intercepts the ISS, even for an instant, for any reason. This is the reason that a secondary payload on an earlier Falcon launch wasn't allowed to be put into its desired orbit. An engine failure on the Falcon's first stage required it to take a modified trajectory into orbit, at which point boosting the secondary payload would have required that, for an instant during its boost, its trajectory pass through the ISS. For this to be dangerous, it would have required the engine to fail in the middle of its burn at a very precise instant. NASA disallowed it, so the secondary payload wasn't able to perform its mission.

So, bringing a spacecraft in for docking requires you to put your craft on a collision course. Docking is just a low-speed collision, after all. NASA will not allow this, so anyone bringing payload to the station has to rendezvous and place the craft within range for the ISS to grab it and bring it in.

Comment Re:As soon as the smart car counts as the driver (Score 4, Insightful) 662

If routine commuting is "fun," then you're doing it wrong. Driving safely and efficiently is, and should be, boring as hell and I can't wait for it to be illegal to operate a vehicle manually on public roadways so I can spend my commuting time doing more interesting things.

You'll always be free to do your driving for fun on private roads and tracks, but keep your "fun" off the roads that I have to share with you.

Comment Re:Hookers (Score 1) 335

A "need" is not necessarily something you have to have or you will die. You won't die if you're locked in a room for the rest of your life with no human contact, but there's a reason that solitary confinement is considered a form of psychological torture. Social contact is a human need, emotional bonding is a human need, sex is a human need. Hell, Maslow's Heirarchy of Needs puts sex in the *bottom tier* of the pyramid.

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