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Comment Re:Enemy of the good (Score 1, Interesting) 104

"So instead of repealing the law, how about extending to also apply to Google and Facebook?"

Not going to happen, I'll get to why in a moment... check out the links when you get the time. The brain doesn't see the world as it is, see the science on reasoning:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYmi0DLzBdQ

This is former national security advisor of the united states Zbigniew Brezinski, worried about the political awakening of the masses, the rich and corporations fear the political awakening of the masses of the globe, so see what they really think behind closed doors here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n7ZyJw_cHJY

On social media -- social media are connected to intelligence agencies... if you think you are going to get privacy it's all bs and optics for the masses.

Reddit and intelligence agencies

Wikileaks -- Reddit and intelligence agencies

These links will take a while to digest, but if you want to understand what's going on in the world, you owe it to yourself to become informed about the true state of the world.

"Intended as an internal document. Good reading to understand the nature of rich democracies and the fact that the common people are not allowed to play a role."

Crisis of democracy

Crisis of democracy - PDF

http://www.amazon.com/Crisis-D... ">Crisis of democracy - BOOK

Education as ignorance

Education as ignorance

Overthrowing other peoples governments

Overthrowing other peoples governments, the master list

Wikileaks on TTIP/TPP/ETC

Wikileaks

Energy subsidies

https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/survey/so/2015/NEW070215A.htm

Interference in other states when the rich/corporations dont get their way

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mxp_wgFWQo&feature=youtu.be&list=PLKR2GeygdHomOZeVKx3P0fqH58T3VghOj&t=724

Protectionism for the rich and big business by state intervention, radical market interference.

http://www.amazon.com/Manufacturing-Consent-Political-Economy-Media/dp/0375714499/

Manufacturing consent:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KwU56Rv0OXM

https://vimeo.com/39566117

Manufacturing consent (book)

http://www.amazon.com/Manufacturing-Consent-Political-Economy-Media/dp/0375714499/

Testing theories of representative government

https://scholar.princeton.edu/sites/default/files/mgilens/files/gilens_and_page_2014_-testing_theories_of_american_politics.doc.pdf

Democracy Inc

http://www.amazon.com/Democracy-Incorporated-Managed- Inverted-Totalitarianism/dp/069114589X

From war is a racket:

"I helped make Mexico, especially Tampico, safe for American oil interests in 1914. I helped make Haiti and Cuba a decent place for the National City Bank boys to collect revenues in. I helped in the raping of half a dozen Central American republics for the benefits of Wall Street. The record of racketeering is long. I helped purify Nicaragua for the international banking house of Brown Brothers in 1909-1912. I brought light to the Dominican Republic for American sugar interests in 1916. In China I helped to see to it that Standard Oil went its way unmolested."[p. 10]

"War is a racket. ...It is the only one in which the profits are reckoned in dollars and the losses in lives." [p. 23] "The general public shoulders the bill [for war]. This bill renders a horrible accounting. Newly placed gravestones. Mangled bodies. Shattered minds. Broken hearts and homes. Economic instability. Depression and all its attendant miseries. Back-breaking taxation for generations and generations." [p. 24]

General Butler is especially trenchant when he looks at post-war casualties. He writes with great emotion about the thousands of traumatised soldiers, many of who lose their minds and are penned like animals until they die, and he notes that in his time, returning veterans are three times more likely to die prematurely than those who stayed home.

http://www.amazon.com/War-Racket-Antiwar-Americas-Decorated/dp/0922915865/

Blum:

http://williamblum.org/aer/read/137

US distribution of wealth

https://imgur.com/a/FShfb

http://www2.ucsc.edu/whorulesamerica/power/wealth.html

The Centre for Investigative Journalism

http://www.tcij.org/

Some history on US imperialism by us corporations.

https://kurukshetra1.wordpress.com/2015/09/27/a-brief-history-of-imperialism-and-state-violence-in-colombia/

The real news

http://www.therealnews.com

Comment Re:Rent not sell (Score 1) 226

"There's that fuzzy grey area in the middle now, though, like with most video games and other software, "

No the reason corporations got away with "licensing" software instead of us owning it was because no one understood tech, aka only the nerds are smart enough to understand computers and coding. Smart nerds always were for software ownership, business got away with a coup against peoples rights to own technology and software. AKA why can't you repair games or get access to the source? BS licensing laws because the average person is too tech illiterate. Basically the whole game industry is built on fraud, cultural works like games should always be owned by players. Not turned into broadcast TV /w the likes of drm...

Basically all online games are fraud - aka paying for a game you never own. League of legends, and other 'drmd' online games got away with mmo/f2p/steam drm because smart customers are nowhere near their offices and cant' punch them in the face. When king gabe newell of valve corp shoved DRM into half-life CS, there was massive outrage, the free market can't work when everyone has high speed internet and the kids are technology illiterate - aka so impulsive they will give away their rights to giant mega corporations and gabe newell because they are idiots and technology stupid.

Basically the public domain and freedom in videogame land was a victim of total corrupt laws that previous entertainment industries passed as well as corrupt laws from business community via software licensing . AKA the whole licensing model is just massive fraud when applied to cultural works like games. Game files are being attacked with encryption and virtual machine drm because the average consumer is not intelligent enough to understand what is happening. Most people are not going to deny themselves entertainment in their short often miserable lives. The reason they got away with this is because you as a customer need physical proximity to game companies or else they will produce games in underhanded ways. This is why steam, origin and MMO's became a thing - the smart people were not in physical proximity so there was no genuine fear of backlash, because the people who don't want it are 100's of miles away. The free market does not work at a distance when buyer and seller are 100's of miles away from each other and there is no physical product... when I buy my computer, in order for the company to be paid it has to be given entirely too me. Software can be taken hostage because of the internet where it's divided into two pieces. No one tech literate wants it, we saw level editing and game modding under attack since the rise of DRM and its going to get a lot worse.

Comment Re:Just do it. (Score 1) 320

Ever paid for an mmo? Used steam? bought agame with onlin drm? Used an iphone? Most people fed this, even technologically literate people. The free market DOES NOT WORK when the business is 100 miles away PLUS the internet, before the internet corporations couldn't shove policy with broadband they will just do what the want and kids/idiot adults will just keep feeding money to apple, valve+steam and the big game companies. Game companies pioneered the walled garden with mmo's and drm, then smart phones came along... once MMO's took off and dlc/microtransactions to that small retard percent of the population gave companies like riot at league of legends massive profits, that 3% or less of the population is SOOO profitable and so fucking stupid with money that 97% of us even if we make the dont pay decision get fucked by that idiotic 3% because these businesses can sustain on that at scale.

Comment The internet and commerce... (Score 1) 91

... are not comptabile when the public is stupid, irrational and tech illiterate. The vast majority of hte people don't know what DRM is or how tech works which is why software and entertainment companies are getting away with re-engineering Windows and software generally to live in the "cloud" (aka walled garden).

Apple, Google, Valve, and other corporations saw phone and videogame companies getting away with basically stealing the peoples right to own their own software and never have it entirely run the users machine, that ended because 1) the average videogame playing person/kid is a grade A moron. 2) Adults who use windows speak a good game about rights but are ultimately also as illiterate as the average videogame playing kid.

Basically human beings minds did not evolve to make rational decisions in a high technology capitalist society so they act like they normally would - like irrational dumb animals.

Fundamentally corporations desire for profits and power means taking away users rights to software on their machines. Phones and videogames have shown corporations the way, so much so that even big physical machine making companies like John Deere are trying to prevent farmers from repairing their tractors due to "software licensing" nonsense, aka claiming farmers never own their own tractors. You can google it.

Software licensing in the context things we should own like human culture and apps that aren't taken hostage inside the "cloud" are what we need but the average person simply is too irrational, too impulsive and too illiterate. You'd pretty much have to challenge the very architecture of capitalist society to get your rights and freedoms back - aka paying citizens a way to buy them the time to clean up corporations and government, good luck getting the average citizen to come to that point of view though.

Comment Re:inebriated hillbillies (Score 1) 70

> I can't wait for a grocery chain (local, national, Amazon, I don't care) to carry a full store's worth of food and let me decide when I want it.

In some areas (I'm in the San Francisco area) Safeway will deliver. http://shop.safeway.com/

However, I looked into it for my aging parents in Oregon and Safeway did not "officially" do deliveries there, but the checkout clerk I was talked with said she shopped and delivered for several older people in town. If Safeway won't deliver in your area you might setup something informal with a Safeway checkout clerk?

Comment Re:who pays? (Score 1) 180

> If it were really that cheap and easy to do I would expect that some company would have already done so and charged everyone a few Euro...

They have, it's called cellular data services (LTE). In Europe it would be Vodafone, Telekom, Orange, etc. Sure, the frequency and protocol is slightly different than 802.11 WiFi, but it is wireless, it is already everywhere, it already works, you can surf web pages on your phone or tablet wirelessly TODAY, and the data rates are a usable 50 Mbits/sec now and they are rolling out upgrades to 100 Mbits/sec and higher. LTE has some European deployments at 450 Mbits/sec today: http://www.ispreview.co.uk/ind...

I wonder what the tradeoff of 802.11 WiFi vs LTE is. While cell phone data plans are a little bit expensive the cellular providers seem to be making steady progress with faster and faster services.

Comment Re:Contrasting anecdote (Score 1) 209

Brian from Backblaze here.

> If the hard drive can survive in the environment provided by Backblaze, then they will certainly do better in a home computer properly built

I suppose it matters. The pods are in a professional datacenter with air filters and sticky paper that we step on before entering the clean datacenter. When we open pods in the datacenter they are NEVER filled with dust bunnies. But when I open up my "properly built" gaming computer at home there are ALWAYS dust bunnies, air in homes with pets and carpets is simply going to have some dust.

Backblaze also monitors everything and fixes every problem, a home computer usually monitors nothing. Recently I was editing video on my laptop and it just shut off (I lost 10 minutes of edits). Turns out it was overheating due to a bad fan, but nothing WARNED me about this so I was subjecting all the components in the laptop to dangerously high levels of heat before the CPU shut down to protect itself. That won't happen in the Backblaze datacenter where we monitor everything, including the temperature of every last one of the 68,813 drives and go fix it when they deviate from normal for any reason.

One of the main things Backblaze does which may or may not occur in a home office is that we do leave the drives powered up 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. If you leave your computer shut down half the time, there may be situations where that extends it's life in your home. For example, if the drives bearings inherently are built for 2 years of continuous run time and you only have the computer turned on 1/2 the time then your drive will last 4 years at home and only 2 years in the Backblaze datacenter.

Comment Re:If it's working for them (Score 1) 209

Brian from Backblaze here.

> most reliability studies on electronics overall curiously do not equate temperature with average failure rates.

Backblaze looked into it in 2014 and we found no correlation: https://www.backblaze.com/blog...

In a conversation with some of the Facebook Open Storage people, they had seen increased failure rates at extremely high temperatures (somewhere up near 40 degrees Celsius) but our drives never get anywhere NEAR the temperatures required to correlate with failures. We monitor every drive for temperature, taking readings once every 2 minutes, and in all but a few unusual conditions (such as some fans have failed) most drives are really running cool at around 25 degrees Celsius.

Comment Re:If it's working for them (Score 1) 209

Brian from Backblaze here.

> What's the typical drive temperature in Backblaze's cases in their environment?

Short answer: the coolest drives are 21.92 Celcius and the hottest drive was 30.54 degrees.

I wrote this up above in response to a temperature question, copy and pasted here. The raw data dump from Backblaze includes drive temperatures as reported by "smartctl". You can find a complete set of historical data of all drive temperatures in the Backblaze datacenter here: https://www.backblaze.com/b2/h...

We analyzed the failures correlated with temperature in this blog post in 2014: https://www.backblaze.com/blog...

In a conversation with some of the Facebook Open Storage people, they said hard drives have increased failure rates at extremely high temperatures (somewhere up near 40 degrees Celcius) but our drives never get anywhere NEAR the temperatures required to correlate with failures. We monitor every drive for temperature, taking readings once every 2 minutes, and we have had situations where the drive temperatures caused our internal warning alerts to go off (well below those catastrophic levels Facebook saw failures at). When we go to investigate, the most common cause of rising pod drive temperature is that some of our fans in that pod have died. We used to have 6 gigantic fans to keep it cool, but we reduced it to 3 with no increase in drive temperature. If one of the fans dies it doesn't get warm enough to set off any alerts, but if 2 out of 3 fans die it can't move enough air to keep the pod within reasonable operating temperatures. We don't monitor the fans directly, but drive temperature has been such a good proxy for it we don't feel any pressing need to figure out how to monitor the fans.

Comment Re:High failure rate (Score 2) 209

Brian from Backblaze here.

> I think their pods only have GigE interfaces

Originally (up until 3 years ago) that was true, but all new pods have 10 GbE interfaces, and 100% of the pods in our "Backblaze 20 pod Vaults" have 10 GbE interfaces. And there are some really strange (and wonderful) performance twists on using 20 pods to store each file: when you fetch a 1 MByte file from a vault, we need 17 pods to respond each supplying only 60k bytes to reassemble the complete file from the Reed Solomon. So the actual bandwidth when fetching just one medium size file can reach more like 170 Gbit/sec theoretical bandwidth. However, if you tried to fetch ALL the files from a pod all at once, the raw 7200 RPM drive performance is our current limiting factor.

Here is a link to a blog post on the 20 pod Backblaze Vault architecture: https://www.backblaze.com/blog...

Here is a link to the Reed Solomon encoding we open sourced that we use on the 20 pod Vaults: https://www.backblaze.com/blog...

Comment Re:High failure rate (Score 2) 209

Brian from Backblaze here.

> I also wonder if we'll ever get numbers from Backblaze on things like the actual temperature ... power these drives lived through.

The raw data dump includes drive temperatures as reported by "smartctl". You can find a dump here: https://www.backblaze.com/b2/h...

We analyzed the failures correlated with temperature in this blog post in 2014: https://www.backblaze.com/blog...

In a conversation with some of the Facebook Open Storage people, they said hard drives have increased failure rates at extremely high temperatures but our drives never get anywhere NEAR the temperatures required to cause failures. We monitor every drive for temperature, taking readings once every 2 minutes, and we have had situations where the drive temperatures caused our internal warning alerts to go off (well below those catastrophic levels Facebook saw failures at). When we go to investigate, the most common cause of rising pod drive temperature is that some of our fans in that pod have died. We used to have 6 gigantic fans to keep it cool, but we reduced it to 3 with no increase in drive temperature. If one of the fans dies it doesn't get warm enough to set off any alerts, but if 2 out of 3 fans die it can't move enough air to keep the pod within reasonable operating temperatures. We don't monitor the fans directly, but drive temperature has been such a good proxy for it we don't feel any pressing need to figure out how to monitor the fans.

Comment Re:High failure rate (Score 1) 209

Brian from Backblaze here.

> Perhaps they don't keep the temperature as cool as they should in order to save a few bucks?

The colocation datacenter is SunGard in Rancho Cordova California and there are other tenants. I assume the temperature of the datacenter is industry standard? But even better, in the raw data dump it includes all the temperatures of all the hard drives, so you (or anybody) could check the correlation. We looked into it in 2014 and didn't find much correlation between temperature and hard drive failure as long as we kept the temperature of any one hard drive well below a tipping point (which we do). Here is the blog article and stats behind our analysis: https://www.backblaze.com/blog...

Comment Re:Reliability (Score 1) 209

> Protection against data loss is done with backups, not RAID.

RAID helps against data loss for some causes of data loss (like hard drives going bad).

However, RAID doesn't protect against human error or software bugs - if you tell a RAID system to delete a file it is deleted - RAID does not mean you can roll back time. If you have a "backup" from a few days ago, if you realize you just destroyed some data with user error, you can use the backup to recover most of the data you just lost.

Just to be absolutely clear - Backblaze does not use RAID inside each pod anymore, we use our own Reed-Solomon encoding across 20 drives in 20 different pods in 20 separate locations inside the datacenter. We open sourced the Reed-Solmon we use here: https://www.backblaze.com/blog... and you can read about how we organize the 20 different pods into a "Backblaze Vault" here: https://www.backblaze.com/blog...

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