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Comment Re:Why? (Score 1) 556

I wasn't being facetious.

'Real Interest' whether it is through internal, external, intrinsic, etc. does not matter. Those 'outside factors' you speak of are probably parents, counselors, peers, etc. Whatever the reason and influence...Your dictionary definition did nothing to explain what you think those outside factors are.

What matters is- do they have a real interest? Is programming something they WANT to do?

I honestly don't really care if a girl was told that 'computers are for boys' when she was 8 years old. She was also told a million other things that led her to become the person that she is. Maybe she is a nurse now. Or a marketing director.

If that previous counseling caused her not to have an interest in programming- then move along. Devote your time to what your interests are and become successful. Your parents may or may not have made a good choice in which direction to steer you.

It is not the responsibility of those currently in the industry to attempt to cultivate an interest in programming within those people who were not encouraged earlier in life. In that case, we'd probably end up getting 1 in 500 or so of these unfortunates who actually develops an interest after our experiment with exposure.

I don't go around to other industries knocking on their doors demanding to be let in...despite the fact that I was never given an opportunity to develop an interest. In some cases I was dissuaded from entering into highly paid careers.

My grandfather was a big influence on my life. He hated two groups of individuals: the rich and the highly educated. My late-in-life and substandard education can be traced back to the conversations he and I would have in the afternoon after school. "If a doctor is so smart, why does it take them 10 years to get through school?" I was programmed not to become a doctor- one of the highest paid and most respected professions.

This doesn't mean that society owes me a foot in the door toward a medical career. I don't think we need to be concerned about these nebulous reasons that females don't prefer programming as a career. We don't need to go back in time and right the wrongs of our ancestors.

Moving forward? Sure, that is a different story. Treat the kids equally. But by the age of 25, I had spent at least 10,000 hours on computer programming. Yes, I had an advantage over a person who was not encouraged in that direction. That doesn't mean we need to be stupid and erase that history and put me on the same footing as someone who started programming in the 3rd year of college. I had an interest, and I exploited it.

Comment Re:Why? (Score 1) 556

I started programming about 37 years ago at the age of 9. Did it for a hobby.

During these 37 years, I've maybe spent 9 where programming was not a primary focus of my life.

Yes, I like the fiddly crap. I enjoy it. Give me a problem and I'm happy. My employer can talk about a business process, and in my mind I'm thinking data organization- it's just how my brain works. My employer benefits from this greatly.

I can't imagine what it would be like if I entered into this career because someone told me that "It's a good job that pays well". I think I'd just absolutely hate every day. This is the most abstract, arcane, tedious job I can imagine. But luckily, I love it.

I have absolutely no problem working with someone else, male or female, who has an interest in this. But if I was partnered with someone who didn't have the interest, I'd know in a few hours. And I'd hate working with them.

Comment Re:Why? (Score 2) 556

Obviously you are going to define this as a problem that society has foisted upon women. No matter what the other arguments may be.

The opportunity is there. There are tons of programs to support women in IT. If there has been some boogeyman out there keeping women from programming, then we can't really do anything about that.

My daughters have had their interests supported as much as my sons. Even more so. I have never seen a 'get your BOYS interested in STEM' while my daughters have been exposed to many of those programs.

Those 'outside factors' you speak of are the boogeymen. You are putting the entire burden on us proving that women don't have these factors. But if the goal is to have equal access to these careers, it exists now.

You are asking us to prove a negative.

Comment Re:Why? (Score 2) 556

I feel very, very bad for the people who are 'encouraged' to go into programming, if it was not their real interest. That is a person being set up for a very dis satisfactory career.

Programming is insanely boring to people who do not have a very high drive/interest in it. I can't think of many worse ways to spend your day, if you are not truly interested.

I work at a University. 70% female enrollment. Female chancellor, female leadership, etc. etc. If the computer science department is 85% men this is not a case of a 'boys club', this is a case of people being drawn to what they are interested in.

The Gender Studies department is about 95% female. They are very active and visible on campus. They spend a lot of time on 'outreach', yet they still can't crack 6% on male involvement. The computer science department also does outreach, and their numbers remain the same, year after year. The women's resource center has special programs to assist women in does the computer science department. There is so much support for women in technology it is amazing.

Yet still they have a hard time getting women to graduate with a degree in computer science.

I wouldn't push the males into gender studies, and I wouldn't push the females into computer science. I would push them to study what truly interests them, and where they think they will excel.

At this point, on this campus, women are not avoiding computer science because they are being treated poorly. They are avoiding computer science because they don't have an interest. Pretending otherwise is avoiding the truth.

Comment Re:Yay! Sharepoint! (Score 4, Interesting) 44

I'm a Microsoft flag waver- for the last 20 years. It's been core to my career.

I absolutely hate Sharepoint, and I hate the way they are integrating it into everything.

Recently I had someone come to me saying that they kept sending out files, and nobody outside of our organization could access them.

Their files were saved to Sharepoint (the default, not their intention) and when they 'attached' the file to an email, Outlook went ahead and sent a link, rather than attaching the file. The link went to our internal Sharepoint, which people on the outside could not access.

I understand all the reasoning for this to happen. But the problem was that this was just a naive user clicking 'Sure, save it there, that is cool' then being stuck in this problem. I told them to save the file elsewhere...but now they had two versions of the file and confusion ensued.

Please, please, please don't make 'further integration with Microsoft products' the default!

And no...nobody has ever wanted to use Sharepoint more. I've been around it for a long time, and I don't understand what the heck it is supposed to be. Ignoring all Sharepoint is a valuable skill.

Comment Re:Not surprising (Score 3, Interesting) 153

But that's the problem...

Apps are VERY trendy. If you want to be hip with apps, you gotta get what is hot this week. And the churn is huge.

I welcome a return to mobile web being the preferred way to get information/do things.

I'm on a 'lesser' mobile platform (Windows). I give a damn about apps. Recently Amazon pulled support for their app on Windows Phone- that's pretty serious when even Amazon doesn't want to make an app on your platform.

But I still muddle along with their website- cuz I gotta buy stuff.

I wish they'd pour their efforts into their website, instead of their apps. Then everybody could have a good experience.

Comment Re:Disease (Score 1) 204

I live a country where Microsoft does release their high-end phones (US). I have the 950, after a 1520, after a...shoot, the one with the big camera, can't remember the model.

But the point is- I agree with you on the apps. Assuming you weren't being sarcastic.

To me, apps are a huge waste of time.

Most apps are only used once or twice. Very few apps are used for more than a couple of months. MOST apps are garbage/un-necessary.

I actually like the fact that there is really no point going to the 'Store' for Windows phone. It just means I don't waste time discovering new apps, downloading them, finding out how the work, then being disappointed. That really is the scenario for about 98% of the apps out there.

Comment Re: Learn what empathy actually means (Score 1) 338

Moving costs REAL money. Buying/selling a house will cost you about 6% (3% times 2). In that area its at least $500,000. So figure at least $30,000 just for real estate agents.

Taxes...title...moving trucks...shit adds up.

Anyone saying, "just move" to someone losing their job is very naive.

Comment I have been waiting for this (Score 1) 67

I've actually been looking for a high-quality All-In-One.

I use a nice workstation at work...two high quality 24 inch displays on a monsterous dual-mount. Giant tower, etc. It's at work and I don't mind it taking all the space. (Coding and photo editing)

I don't want a giant set of monitors and a noisy tower at home. I have a nice office, and I want to keep it that way. I was looking for an All-In-One, and I was actually resigned to buying a Mac, because of the screen. For photo editing the screen is the primary component...not the 'power' of the computer, or even the OS. I just want a nice big screen in an attractive package, with the fewest cords possible.

The 5K iMac is evidently at the top of the heap right now.

There is a market for a high-end AIO. I'm glad Microsoft is providing a product to fill the space. I am a photographer, and I see clients in my office. So it has to look good on my desk. Having touch is a big bonus, and zero cords (a battery would be wonderful) would top off the dream.

Under $1,800 and you can pretty much sign me up right now.

Comment Re:Getting There (Score 1) 385

I have two optical media readers in my world.

#1- computer at work has a reader. I don't know if it works, I've never used is 3 years old.

#2- my Xbox 360 has a reader. About 4 years ago one of my kids broke it, and it has caused me zero inconvenience since then. Occasionally I will get new games, but it is always a download.

The last time I thought about optical media was when my mom came to visit. She wanted to show me some pictures, or a movie, or something and she held up a DVD like it was a prize. "Where is your DVD player?" I was very happy to tell her that I didn't have one.

DVDs had a very short lifespan in my world. Probably the shortest of all media, other than those small Sony...Minidiscs? I had one of those players that I thought was awesome, for like two months.

Comment Re: Microsoft's Customers are Screwed.. Again (Score 2) 140

I think you are giving Apple way too much credit.

Both companies do a good job of taking other ideas, refining them, then using their size and resources to bring products to market.

Regarding Bing- yes, there is a need for it. If you only look at consumer search functionality Google serves that purpose, and is generally better than Bing. (I am a lonely Bing user...) But- do you recommend that nobody else compete in this space? More importantly, Microsoft owns the index/search technology they use for other products- such as Cortana. Indexing huge amounts of information is a very important function moving forward. Microsoft reps have stated many times that the primary importance of Bing is not the direct consumer space.

Apple has had its share of 'me too' products. I bought more than my share of 'Performa' macs, which were just absolute crap. Their Apple Watch is crap. They have had many others. Hell, I owned an Apple III, when everyone with any sense was buying IBM.

Apple has had a few blockbuster successes, which have led to them being a hugely successful company. But that does not elevate them to some incredible status where they do no wrong or are just better than other companies.

Comment It's a matter of congestion (Score 1) 381

*If* self-driving cars can reduce congestion significantly, the changeover will be a tidal wave.

I live near enough to San Francisco, that I could make the trip easily enough for a relaxing day in a great city. Unfortunately, traffic is a nightmare. So I avoid it. Driving on the freeway to Sacramento is ridiculous. I avoid that too. Once there is a reasonable percentage of autonomous cars, that traffic should be greatly reduced by being more efficient. (Not the number of cars going down, but the overall efficiency going up).

Also, a lot of deliveries could easily be handled via autonomous vehicles. Again, the efficiency would be killer. Set up all deliveries to be at night! Mail, packages, etc. Just drop them in a specified area in front of my house, and I'll pick it up in the morning.

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