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Submission + - Hackers break into Polish banks through government regulator charged with bank s (cyberscoop.com)

Patrick O'Neill writes: Polish banks are scrambling to figure out just how bad they've been hit in a cyberattack described as "likely the most serious incident in the history of Polish banking industry." The first victim and the vector through which the rest got hit was the Polish financial regulator KNF, which is responsible for enforcing security standards in the banking industry.

Submission + - Dark net markets moving to adopt bug bounty programs (cyberscoop.com)

Patrick O'Neill writes: What's mainstream in Silicon Valley is now moving onto the dark net. A major anonymous black market announced a bug bounty program this week offering rewards north of $10,000 (in bitcoin, of course) for bugs deemed critical to the market or its users. The move mirrors the widespread adoption of bounty programs from Apple to the Pentagon.

Submission + - AI enters the bug bounty (theregister.co.uk)

trowlFAZ writes: Pitting the power of computer v computer to find the weak links and try and patch it before exploited. The interesting part will be to see how much of the findings are shared.

"The AI systems were also rather sneaky, according to John Launchbury, director of I2O. One of the competitors found a bug in operating system code used by all players, developed an exploit for the flaw, and used it to attack another competitor to steal some data. A third competitor saw what happened, figured out what the vulnerability was, and patched itself in response."

Submission + - Are Gates, Musk Being "Too Aggressive" With AI Concerns? (xconomy.com)

gthuang88 writes: Bill Gates and Elon Musk are sounding the alarm “too aggressively” over artificial intelligence’s potential negative consequences for society, says MIT professor Erik Brynjolfsson. The co-author of “The Second Machine Age” argues it will take at least 30 to 50 years for robots and software to eliminate the need for human laborers. In the meantime, he says, we should be investing in education so that people are prepared for the jobs of the future, and are focused on where they still have an advantage over machines---creativity, empathy, leadership, and teamwork.

Submission + - Sage and Locky Ransomware Now Sharing Delivery Infrastructure in Phishing Attack (phishme.com)

tyachillez writes: Threat actors have demonstrated that despite the past two years’ explosion in new ransomware varieties, ransomware developers still believe that the market has not reached the point of saturation. Examples of encryption ransomware like Sage have made notable appearances on the phishing threat landscape in the early days of 2017, continuing the ransomware trend from 2016.

Submission + - 4 Forgotten Code Constructs: Time to Revisit the Past?

mikeatTB writes: Some things in the programming world are so easy to misuse that most people prefer to never use them at all. These are the programming equivalent of a flamethrower: You might rarely be in the position to really need one, but every once in a while it turns out that you need to take down a forest. In that case, there’s no easier way than going Rambo on your codebase. That's where a few of the old, forgotten code constructs come into play. Creative use of features such as goto, multiple inheritance, eval, and recursion may be just the right solution for experienced developers when used in the right situation. Is it time to resurrect these four forgotten code constructs?

Comment Re:Radiation! (Score 1) 420

Ever been to Utah? Ra-di-a-tion. Yes, indeed. You hear the most outrageous lies about it. Half-baked goggle-box do-gooders telling everybody it's bad for you. Pernicious nonsense. Everybody could stand a hundred chest X-rays a year. They ought to have them, too. When they canceled the project it almost did me in. One day my mind was full to bursting. The next day - nothing. Swept away. But I showed them. I had a lobotomy in the end. Friend of mine had one. Designer of the neutron bomb. You ever hear of the neutron bomb? Destroys people - leaves buildings standing. Fits in a suitcase. It's so small, no one knows it's there until - BLAMMO. Eyes melt, skin explodes, everybody dead. So immoral, working on the thing can drive you mad. That's what happened to this friend of mine. So he had a lobotomy. Now he's well again.

Submission + - Steve Ballmer's Big-Time Error: Not Resigning Years Ago (slashdot.org)

Nerval's Lobster writes: Any number of executives could take Ballmer’s place, including a few he unceremoniously kicked to the curb over the years. Whoever steps into that CEO role, however, faces a much greater challenge than if Ballmer had quietly resigned several years ago. Ballmer famously missed the boat on tablets and smartphones; Windows 8 isn't selling as well as Microsoft expected; and on Websites and blogs such as Mini-Microsoft (which had a brilliant posting about Ballmer’s departure), employees complain bitterly about the company’s much-maligned stack-ranking system, its layers of bureaucracy, and its inability to innovate. Had Ballmer left years ago, replaced by someone with the ability to more keenly anticipate markets, the company would probably be in much better shape to face its coming challenges. In its current form, Microsoft often feels like it’s struggling in the wake of Amazon, Google, Apple, and Facebook.

Submission + - The Guardian: Snowden *did not* leak to the Independent

hazeii writes: In an interesting twist, the Guardian is reporting that Snowden responded this morning that he is not the source of the Independent's reporting of the earlier Slashdot story revealing the UK's Middle East fibre-interception base. The suggestion seems to be that this is a deliberate (that is, official but unattributed) leak intended to discredit Snowden, Greenwald et al. by "unofficially" releasing information that may be of genuine use to terrorists.

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