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Comment Re:doh! (Score 2, Informative) 528

Obama didn't release his birth certificate for one very good reason, he is very clever and Trump is very stupid.

The fact is that the Republicans will always invent some crazy idiotic 'scandal' that they obsess about and endlessly throw up smoke. The birther conspiracy was mind numbingly ridiculous. It would require someone to go back in time to plant the birth notice in the papers. Or for some group of conspirators to go to an enormous amount of trouble in order to make a particular black kid president.

So rather than release the birth certificate and let the Republicans invent a new scandal, Obama held onto it and let them obsess about a scandal nobody else thought made the slightest sense, knowing that he could knock their house of cards down any time he chose. Which of course he did a week before the Bin Laden raid which was guaranteed to end the story.

George W. Bush opened torture chambers across the world and collected photographs for a sick sexual thrill. Yet nobody ever talks about that. None of the people complaining about Hilary ever complained about GWB refusing to comply with Congressional investigation or the deletion of 5 million emails.

So here is what is going to happen. Trump is going to go down to the biggest defeat since Carter and he is going to drag the rest of his party down with him. And afterwards there is going to be a new civil rights act that prohibits Republican voter suppression tactics and the gerrymandering that give them a 5% advantage in elections. And by the time it is all done the Republican party will have two choices, either boot the racist conspiracy theorists and Trumpists out or face two decades in the wilderness.

Comment Re:Proof? (Score 1) 822

You don't think people would want to watch videos of people having sex? I used to masturbate while looking at underwear catalogs. The problem with the plan is that 'degrading porn' is a red herring. Why don't we ban non-erotic media that are violent or degrading? I have a hunch that many of the anti-porn crusaders just don't like it when people masturbate.

Comment Re:Proof? (Score 1) 822

That is an interesting assumption on your part. On the other hand, from people I know who work at schools, there is an increasing problem of boys who don't seem to realize that girlfriends don't like being treated like porn starts and girls who think it's normal for sex to be all about the man's sexual gratification and not the woman's.

At the very least, we have a problem with porn being the only sexual education some of these kids are getting.

Doesn't that suggest that we should produce ideal porn that sends the messages that we want to send? Perhaps there could be government sponsered healthy porn.

Comment Re:Doing the ecological epidemiology (Score 1) 279

.... usually results in findings like this:

http://tylervigen.com/spurious... [tylervigen.com]

After viewing the link I must say that, while I understand the point you're trying to make, I think that there probably IS more than just a passing correlation between the number of people who drowned after falling out of fishing boats, and the marriage rate in Kentucky.

Comment You can probably afford hardware (Score 3, Insightful) 78

You should buy a something like a SBC (Pi or Arduino) and get a breadboard and some motion control chips and a a stepper motor. All of that together will cost about $60. (Breadboard maybe $10, chips maybe another $10, stepper motor maybe another $10, Raspberry Pi maybe $30). You could at least learn the basics of working with the chips and working with a motor.

Comment Re:Did anyone actually read the articles? (Score 1) 432

Did anyone read this article? [space.com]. "Geoff Marcy ....

Yep. Summary: famous astronomer resigns because a few people accused him of stuff. Like one guy says he saw him rubbing a girls shoulders. Scary stuff.

Or how about this one? [cnn.com] "Results from a recent AAS survey ...

Yep. Summary: Incredibly low number of people in astronomy say that at some point in their lives they've heard a co-worker or superior say something sexist. Actual rates of sexual harassment remain unknown because the survey focused on compiling superficially scary sounding numbers rather than useful information.

Comment Re:-1 Self-Refuting (Score 1) 432

You can't claim that all of this stuff is so unusual that it is newsworthy and then a paragraph afterwards say that it's so common that men everywhere are actively avoiding women. Pick a story and stick to it.

He didn't say it was common, and it doesn't have to be common. Our fear of something is a combination of both the likelihood of occurrence and the extent of possible harm were it to occur. Parents are constantly telling their children not to talk to strangers, and we have a whole system of procedures which kick in when a child goes missing, even though actual kidnappings by strangers are incredibly rare.

Employees know that a harassment complaint can ruin a good working environment, as well as result in the termination of an otherwise promising career. Employers know it can cost them millions of dollars. Everyone is worried about it, even if it's not particularly common. Basically, at this point, having female employees is an unnecessary risk with severe repercussions and no tangible benefits.

Comment Re:Recognize them??? (Score 1) 144

Actually, incorrect. While some awards (e.g. the Bronze Star, Medal of Honor) are given for unusual behavior (e.g. heroism), the military has the worlds' original badge system. There are badges for everything.

This is true as long as you're speaking about the US military. It seems like you guys get 9 medals before even completing basic. The same cannot be said for other countries. Most Commonwealth nations are much more stingy with medals - if you end up with 5 or 6 in your whole career, you've done well.

Comment Re:Wny did they need the certificates? (Score 1) 95

Issuing for .test and .local are strictly prohibited by the CABForum EV requirements. They will soon be outlawed for DV under the basic requirements.

What seems to have happened is that instead of issuing all test certs for test.verisign.com as the procedure manual required, they had to modify the procedure when Symantec took over and they no longer had verisign.com.

So instead of doing what they should have done and using test.symantec.com or a test domain bought for the purpose, they typed the first name that entered their head.

Comment Re:Self Signed (Score 1) 95

Actually it doesn't. DANE certificates are not self-signed for a start, they are signed by the DNSSEC key for the zone.

The problem with DANE is that you swap the choice of multiple CAs for a monopoly run by ICANN, a shadowy corporation that charges a quarter million bucks for a TLD because that is what the market will bear. What do you think the price of DANE certification will rise to if it takes off?

ICANN is the Internet version of the NFL only with greater opportunities for peculation and enrichment.

Comment Re:Wny did they need the certificates? (Score 1) 95

Damn right they should. The CPS has a long section on the use of test hardware.

The problem is that all the original team that built VeriSign have been gone for years. A lot of us left before the sale of the PKI business to Symantec. The PKI/DNS merger was not a happy or successful partnership. The original point of the merger was to deploy DNSSEC. that effort was then sabotaged by folk in IETF and ICANN which has delayed the project by at least 10 and possibly 20 years. ATLAS was originally designed to support DNSSEC.

Unfortunately, in PKI terms what VeriSign was to IBM, Symantec is to Lenovo.

They apparently remember the ceremonies we designed but not the purpose. So they are going through the motions but not the substance.

One of the main criticisms I have heard is that we built the system too well. From 1995 up to 2010 it worked almost without any issues. So people decided that they didn't need things like proper revocation infrastructure. The only recent issue the 1995 design could not have coped with was DigiNotar which was a complete CA breach.

There are some developments on the horizon in the PKI world that will help add controls to mitigate some of the issues arising since. But those depend on cryptographic techniques that won't be practical for mass adoption till we get our next generation ECC crypto fully specified.

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