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Comment Re:Variance from Ars Technica's Wifi testing (Score 1) 292

What they don't mention, is that WiFi on iPhone is horribly broken, and it seems that every Wifi vendor has to workaround the issues (everyone from Ruckus to Unifi has to specifically target the iPhones). The only thing more broken is the Fitbit Aria.. In fact, on OSX, we discovered when a computer was in sleep mode, it kept hanging onto its DHCP address until the lease expired, even if the entire network was reset whilst it was turned off.. So junk like that saves battery life, but its bad behavior.

Also, changing the DTIM on a wifi AP can have a significant impact on battery life too.

It wouldn't surprise me if iPhone consumed more battery life, simply because there is less competition and a smaller market, so there is far less incentive for hardware developers to optimise their drivers for that platform (not even sure if Apple or hardware developers code the drivers though).

The only reason people think of Apple's software and hardware as stable and the worlds best, is because of clever marketing, and sheep.

Comment Oracle is the problem (Score 1) 104

If Oracle genuinely cared about Java, they would release it, and the patents to the community.

You'd literally be insane to touch it at the moment. Oracle will step on too many toes eventually, and the more toes they step on, the bigger the risk of using Java long term is. They have a long history of being d**ks, but the most recent I remember, is when they forked Redhat to make their own distro, which was basically exactly the same, but a few minor kernel tweaks, and that users paid Oracle instead of Redhat.

There is NO good reason for any open source developer to support them.

Comment Allow DMCA abusers to be shut down too (Score 5, Insightful) 263

If the law also allows DMCA abusers to be shut down too, I have less of a problem with this law (by which I mean, companies which send out DMCA notices incorrectly). And by shut down, I mean, being unable to send out notices in the future, and disconnected from the internet entirely (including their company website)

It wouldn't surprise me if all members of the MPAA have incorrectly sent out DMCA notices before, for media they had no rights too (a news station for instance shut down a video of a Mars landing uploaded by NASA).

So, if laws were put in place to allow companies to be shut down, if they abuse the DMCA, or make a mistake, I wouldn't have a problem with this, because it would ensure that notices were only sent in cases that they were warranted.

But the way it stands, it just opens the system up to more bullying and abuse.

Comment Re:Not sure what they're looking at? (Score 3) 161

Exactly this. They are also barely upgradable, you need to pay 5x more for a laptop with decent specs, and many have weird linux compatibility issues in Linux, whereas most desktop's just work (on my Asus for instance, the I need to send a kernel parameter so it doesn't think my wifi is turned off).

And, they will wear out faster, be less maintainable, etc. Lets revisit this story when laptops are modular.

Comment Re:encouraging piracy (Score 1) 437

Where in Australia, apparently Netflix will be introduced in March. However, knowing Australia, we'll probably be paying $30 per month (which is a ripoff), and will have barely any US shows. In all likelihood, it will be filled to the brink of shonky Australian Reality TV programs.

In that case, I'll just stop watching TV shows and just get back to doing more programming.

Comment Re:Makes things worse (Score 1) 355

That's nice. I hear that the best form of debate is where you just to call everything you don't agree with bullshit. Fortunately for you, you may even get a few upvotes.

However, judging by the fact that you seem to receive very few upvotes at all for any of the comments you post (but quite a few downvotes), I'm going to suggest that you change strategy, and maybe accept that you can be wrong. Because, applied to software, you sound like the kind of guy who will claim that a problem doesn't exist (because you can't replicate it), until your coworkers find it and fix it for you.

Those two stories are totally legit. Believe it or not, I actually forgot about them until recently because they are from 5-10 years ago. Every male including myself knows that every female pretty much strolls online and gets harassed. And, stuff like that needs to change. I don't believe from a business point of view women will ever get full pay parity (because if they have kids they will be away from work, etc), but, things are worse than that. The Christmas tree thing had good intentions, but the plan is kind of flawed

Comment Re:Makes things worse (Score 1) 355

In one place I worked, the CEO said they don't hire women because all they do is "sit around and look pretty, and hang out on facebook". At another, the director was worried about sexual harassment issues.

The problem isn't the workers, its the people doing the hiring, and the CEO's. I agree that women don't seem to be as interested in IT, but, with all due respect, there are serious problems in our industry, and you sir, are actually the one saying bullshit (but you might not realise it).

And yes, this is written by a guy. And no, I don't support everything women claims, but, the above is just my experience (its the side of the story which people like yourself may not hear about).

Submission + - 6 Terabyte Hard Drive Round-Up: WD Red, WD Green And Seagate Enterprise 6TB (

MojoKid writes: The hard drive market has become a lot less sexy in the past few years thanks to SSDs. What we used to consider "fast" for a hard drive is relatively slow compared to even the cheapest of today's solid state drives. But there are two areas where hard drives still rule the roost, and that's overall capacity and cost per gigabyte. Since most of us still need a hard drive for bulk storage, the question naturally becomes, "how big of a drive do you need?" For a while, 4TB drives were the top end of what was available in the market but recently Seagate, HGST, and Western Digital announced breakthroughs in areal density and other technologies, that enabled the advent of the 6 Terabyte hard drive. This round-up looks at three offerings in the market currently, with a WD Red 6TB drive, WD Green and a Seagate 6TB Enterprise class model. Though the WD drives only sport a 5400RPM spindle speed, due to their increased areal density of 1TB platters, they're still able to put up respectable performance. Though the Seagate Enterprise Capacity 6TB (also known as the Constellation ES series) drive offers the best performance at 7200 RPM, it comes at nearly a $200 price premium. Still, at anywhere from .04 to .07 per GiB, you can't beat the bulk storage value of these new high capacity 6TB HDDs.

Comment Re:Makes things worse (Score 1) 355

Things are a bit different in those occupations though. I'm a male, and there are many women who are avoiding computing simply because of the way they are being treated (I didn't want to believe it either). But, in occupations such as nursing, where there are less men, they aren't finding that men aren't being hired simply because of a persons gender. In fact, they are actively being encouraged to join and hired.

But women on the other hand are often being treated badly, the moment they contribute to any computing discussion (many female blogs are absolutely buried in comments from 10 year old guys saying how they will mistreat them). So targeting high schools is only a good thing.

But, I don't believe discriminating against men to get women into the field is the right way either, which is the case here. I was the only guy in my high school who knew C++, and I wouldn't have been happy if Google wouldn't let me join in with a major project, despite being a super nerd in my spare time instead of going to parties. Its the wrong approach.

Comment Makes things worse (Score 3, Insightful) 355

We do need more women in the tech field, but my feeling is that having exclusively female projects like this can actually widen the gap.

What it basically says is that girls and boys can't work together, and it doesn't teach guys to work as coworkers with women. Furthermore, boys who wanted to join in, later in life may feel jealous that women always get what they want, and may avoid hiring women.

A better approach would have been to have 2 trees, 1 for the females, 1 for the males.Nobody would feel left out then.

Comment Re:Those poor bastards (Score 2) 102

What's wrong with Drupal? It's modular, very flexible, free, secure, and has been demonstrated to be good enough by other major organisations (ie, the Whitehouse, and Australia is essentially America's lapdog these days).

It's not easy to set up, but, that doesn't make it a poor choice, and what other alternative can you suggest which is proven to be secure, is flexible, modular and has a huge community base?

I hate our government for so many things, but, it's very easy to implement a powerful search engine in Drupal, and there are so many modules available that its a good choice for projects designed to last well into the future.

Also, one of my mates found a serious backdoor in a CMS system used often in Europe (and it was open source). So, since the Whitehorse has likely done some auditing of the Drupal code, it makes sense for the AU government to build on top of their work/testing.

Comment Re:Nothing has changed (Score 1) 113

Out of curiosity, have you found issues with the Wireless, multiple networks (ie, guest networks) and the Billion 7800NXL's? The only reason I ask, is because Billion is denying an issue with both of these things, but, we seem to be able to easily replicate issues..

Comment Nothing has changed (Score 4, Informative) 113

I work for a company which installs and deploys home / business networks for home automation purposes, and EVERY Linksys device we have tested, has inevitably ended up in the bin, not because they were faulty, but because they turned out to be rubbish.

Linksys has a long history of producing unstable devices, and their original WRT54GL Linux router's only redeeming feature was that it was open source. The interface was terrible, and so was the firmware. In fact, we aren't only talking routers, because we noticed that some of Linksys's cheap gigabit switches had issues with stuttering when playing media (no other switches were affected by this issue, including 10/100 cisco ones). It's particularly pathetic given that Blu-ray requires only 54mbps to stream.

Even assuming that patches are supplied which fixes the issues with this router, unless Linksys seriously has seriously improved their development team, and their hardware, you would be far better off with a cheap TP-Link which acts solely as a router/ADSL modem, a switch which manages the network traffic (NOT A LINKSYS ONE), and Unifi's for your Wifi (those are a dream to roll out in bulk, and the new Unifi software if it comes will even support Seamless wireless WITHOUT an expensive hardware controller).

Further evidence, we didn't even want to risk selling our used Linksys equipment on eBay and damage our seller rating (it was worth the write-off)..

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