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Comment Yes but no (Score 1) 1

A long TTL would have mitigated the repeated requests for the same domain.. but the attack is automatically prepending random strings to the domain names, making each a request for a subdomain unique. The potential space of possible subdomains is large enough that it isn't saturated, so no amount of caching would work.

Submission + - Would redundancy and really long TTL have countered a lot of DDOS effects? ( 1

marmot7 writes: My primary takeaways from this article was that it's important to have redundancy (additional NS's) and that it's important to have a very long TTL when you're not actively updating something. Would the measures in this article have at least limited the damage of these attacks? The long TTL change alone would have made the cache likely covered the entire attack, right?

Submission + - DNA testing for jobs may be on its way, warns Gartner (

dcblogs writes: It is illegal today to use DNA testing for employment, but as science advances its understanding of genes that correlate to certain desirable traits — such as leadership and intelligence — business may want this information. People seeking leadership roles in business, or even those in search of funding for a start-up, may volunteer their DNA test results to demonstrate that they have the right aptitude, leadership capabilities and intelligence for the job. This may sound farfetched, but it's possible based on the direction of the science, according to Gartner analysts David Furlonger and Stephen Smith, who presented their research Wednesday at the firm's Symposium IT/xpo in Orlando. This research is called "maverick" in Gartner parlance, meaning it has a somewhat low probability and is still years out, but its potential is nonetheless worrisome to the authors. It isn't as radical as it seems. Job selection on the basis of certain desirable genetic characteristics is already common in the military and sports. Even without testing, businesses, governments and others may use this understanding about how some characteristics are genetically determined to develop new interview methodologies and testing to help identify candidates predisposed to the traits they desire.

Submission + - Just 2 weeks in the mountains can change your blood for months (

schwit1 writes: The human body begins adapting to high-elevation environments as quickly as overnight, and these biological changes can last for months — even after the person has returned to lower elevations.

For the first time ever, scientists comparing the blood of mountain hikers have observed how multiple changes affect the red blood cells' ability to retain oxygen in low-oxygen environments — and it happens within hours.

The find contradicts an assumption that’s lasted for half a century suggesting that humans in high-altitude environments start producing new red blood cells that are more capable of supplying oxygen to their muscles and organs than the average human’s blood.

Submission + - The mathematics of the American Justice System (

Bob the Super Hamste writes: The BBC is reporting on the Compas assessment, Correctional Offender Management Profiling for Alternative Sanctions. This tool is used by a number of agencies to assess if someone is likely to commit additional crimes and the resulting score is used in determining bail, sentencing, or determining parole. The article points out that while the questions on the assessment do not include race the resulting score may be correlated with race but this is disputed by the software's creators. The assessment scores someone on a 10 point scale but the algorithm used to determine someone's score is kept secret. Because of this defendants are unable to effectively dispute that the score is incorrect.

Submission + - AT&T (T) to Unveil ECOMP in Open Source Industry in 1Q17 (

walterbyrd writes: U.S. telecom giant AT&T Inc. T is moving ahead with plans to introduce its Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) virtualization platform in the open source industry in the first quarter of 2017. In relation to this, the company announced that it will release all 8.5 million lines of code for ECOMP. AT&T further claims that it has plans to standardize ECOMP as one of the best automated platforms for managing virtual network functions and other software-centric network operations in the telecom industry.

Meanwhile, AT&T also moved ahead to release ECOMP as an open source software in collaboration with the Linux Foundation.

Submission + - A design-build-test cycle for the invention of living things (

the_newsbeagle writes: Engineers know how to iterate. Whether they're working in hardware or software, they use the design-build-test cycle to get from an idea to a satisfactory product. Now synthetic biologists are applying this approach to inventing strange new life forms. Ginkgo Bioworks, a hip Boston startup that recently raised $100 million, considers itself an "organism factory." The company's bioengineers use synthetic DNA and a highly automated lab to create novel organisms, trying out thousands of variants as they work toward one that has useful properties—like a yeast that spits rose oil, which Ginkgo is developing for a French perfume company.

Submission + - SPAM: Thousands Are In Turkish Prisons For Downloading an App

schwit1 writes: It is a shoddy messaging app. Its dark blue logo looks like a diamond, representing the impenetrable nature of the app that has been at the heart of mass detentions in Turkey.

You could download ByLock from Apps or Google Play. After the login, you have to draw random lines to access your contact list. It is perhaps one of the worst-quality messaging app that frequently crashed. It often failed to send a message properly, and when it did, its self-destruct system pushed you to a breaking point. It was just a stupid messaging app that people thought was secure to communicate. Just as how people in the West switch to encrypted messaging apps such as Telegram or Signal to avoid government surveillance.

The government announced that at least 250,000 people downloaded ByLock on their cell phones. Even tracking this number is a violation of the law, but... oh well, who cares, right? More than 40,000 of these people worked in public institutions and suspected of being sympathizers of the Gulen movement.

Scores of people are being rounded up every single day for downloading this app. It is estimated that more than 50,000 people have been detained since July for downloading ByLock at one point in the past two years. More than 40,000 people were fired or suspended from public institutions over the messaging app. Only this week, 12,800 police officers were suspended, most of whom made into the list for downloading this app.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Deep Space Network glitches worry scientists (

sciencehabit writes: Earlier this year, the Cassini spacecraft screwed up an orbital maneuver at Saturn because of a problem with its radio connection to Earth. The incident was one of several recent glitches in the Deep Space Network (DSN), NASA’s complex of large radio antennas in California, Spain, and Australia. For more than 50 years, the DSN has been the lifeline for nearly every spacecraft beyond Earth’s orbit, relaying commands from mission control and receiving data from the distant probe. On 30 September, in a meeting at NASA headquarters, officials will brief planetary scientists on the network’s status. Many are worried, based on anecdotal reports, that budget cuts and age have taken a toll that could endanger the complex maneuvers that Cassini and Juno, a spacecraft now at Jupiter, will require over the next year.

Submission + - Homeland Security Committee Chair Says Crypto Backdoors Would Hurt U.S. Economy

Trailrunner7 writes: Rep. Michael McCaul, the chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security, said forcing vendors to install backdoors or intentionally weakened encryption in their products is not the solution to the disagreement over law enforcement access to encrypted devices and said there needs to be international standards for how the problem is handled.

“The easy knee-jerk solution I thought was let’s just put a back door in everyone’s iPhone that law enforcement can access. Simple, makes sense,” McCaul said.

“Putting in a back door isn’t the solution. People don’t the government to have access to their data. The government wasn’t asking Apple to put in codes to create a vulnerability that would kill their product. We think there’s a better way and a better solution to doing that.”

McCaul also said that pressure from the U.S. government to insert backdoors could drive tech companies to take their operations out of the country.

“I don’t see it as privacy versus security. I see it as security versus security,” he said. “I don’t want to weaken encryption and drive these companies offshore.”

Submission + - Suggested poll to rouse the rabble?

shanen writes: What if WikiLeaks released the plausible, highly embarrassing, but possibly fake tax returns of Donald J Trump?

(1) Trump would still refuse to release his tax returns?

(2) Trump would release his tax returns and he would be helped by the resulting cloud of confusion.

(3) Trump would be hurt by the spotlight.

(4) Cowboy Neal already has the results of the audit!

Just a thought experiment, but remembering how they handled Dan Rather and how WikiLeaks works, I suspect Assange is already sitting on the Donald's tax returns...

Submission + - What Happens When Judges Pull the Plug on Rural America (

mirandakatz writes: After the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in favor of restrictive state laws that prevent municipalities from setting up their own networks, Pinetops, North Carolina had its internet cut off. And that's just the tip of the iceberg: as Susan Crawford points out at Backchannel, the court decision is likely to spur the introduction of even more restrictive laws, making it increasingly difficult to ensure that we move the entire country over to fiber-plus-advanced-wireless, not leaving pockets of rural America without 21st century connectivity. For too long, local heroes have been fighting this fight—but Crawford argues that this needs to be a focus of the next president of the United States.

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