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Comment Unionization worked in the past, kill it now. (Score 0, Troll) 594

Sorry, this guy should quit and find another job.
Assembling a car is unskilled labor. Unionization just drives the cost of production up. If the work is to hard, then quit.

Is framing a house, pouring/finishing concrete or laying brick/tile ergonomic? People do it every day in bad weather.

Unions served a purpose when workers were exploited. There was a large pool of unskilled workers, and if one got hurt, you just got another one because the job required little skill. But the unions also artificially inflated wages for many of these jobs. OSHA and many local and federal laws now exist to protect workers that didn't exist many years ago.

All this guy is doing is highlighting why a company will eventually get rid of his job an use a robot to do the same repetitive task.

Comment It is a standard question, here is why. If you don (Score 1) 435

This came about in response to the huge IT growth around 2000 before the bubble burst on the dot com world. People were getting offers for huge salary increases because there was a skills shortage. HR groups added this as a way to stop the madness. They use your salary history to validate career progression to some extent, but they also use it as a way to guage a reasonable offer - say a 10% increase over your current may be considered the company rule.

Most large companies do this. If they offer you a job, they may even ask for W2 to compare to what you put on application.

Submission + - Alberta Man Turns Table on Laptop Thief (nationalpost.com)

jbwiebe writes: Cochrane’s Stu Gale couldn’t believe his eyes when a notification popped up on his computer telling him someone had logged on to his recently stolen laptop.

The B.C.-based 51-year-old computer security and automation expert couldn’t let the opportunity to try to find out something about the apparent thief pass him by, so he attempted to remotely log on to the pilfered laptop.

Submission + - The backlash against self-driving cars officially begins (cnn.com)

Paul Fernhout writes: "An organization that advocates for professional drivers has urged New York to ban self-driving cars from the state's roads for 50 years. The Upstate Transportation Association fears that self-driving cars will eliminate thousands of jobs and damage the local economy."

Submission + - NASA Mission Asteroid for Metals Worth Ten Thousand Quadrillion Dollars

randomErr writes: NASA wants to uncover the mystery behind the asteroid “16 Psyche.” that may contain a priceless treasure trove of minerals. “We’ve been to all the different planets, we’ve been to other asteroids. But we’ve never visited a body that has been made of entirely metal,” said Carol Polanskey, project scientist for the Psyche mission. Now NASA, led by researchers at Arizona State University, plans to send an unmanned spacecraft to orbit 16 Psyche – an asteroid roughly the size of Massachusetts, made of iron and other precious metals. The mission’s leader estimates that the iron alone on today’s market would be worth $10,000 quadrillion.

Submission + - SPAM: Financial Services Company Automates 17,000 Low-End Jobs Without Layoffs

An anonymous reader writes: Financial Services company Accenture claims that it has automated 17,000 back-office jobs without laying off any employees, instead anticipating the switch and retraining the staff early into higher-difficulty roles. The company's CEO Richard Lumb, who has recently presented a report with an uncommonly optimistic vision for how AI and automation can benefit companies and workers, said "Over the last 18 months, automation replaced 17,000 jobs in back office processing. But actually, we haven’t laid those people off. We are fortunate enough to reskill and reposition them."
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Trump assembles band of H-1B supporters to advise him (computerworld.com)

dcblogs writes: In his campaign for president, Donald Trump tapped into the viral anger over the use of H-1B visa to displace U.S. workers. The outsourcing of high-skill jobs is a "tremendous threat," he said. Disney workers who trained visa-holding replacements spoke at some of his rallies. But soon after the election, President-elect Trump assembled a 16-member team of CEO-level executives to advise him on job creation, including many from firms that send jobs overseas and have advocated for an H-1B cap increase. Trump's appointments included one of the pioneers of offshore outsourcing to India: Jack Welch, the former chairman and CEO of General Electric. Also on this committee is Bob Iger, the chairman and CEO of Disney, whose offshoring of Disney IT workers was a topic at a Republican presidential candidate debate. The chairman of the "President's Strategic and Policy Forum" is Stephen Schwarzman, the chairman and CEO of Blackstone, a private equity firm that is betting on the success of IT offshore outsourcing. Blackstone last year acquired a majority stake in Mphasis, an India-based IT services firm that is categorized by the U.S. as H-1B dependent, meaning 15% or more of its workers are on a visa. Following Trump's appointments, the Partnership for New York City, a business group, issued a report detailing five "federal priorities." One priority includes immigration reform to increase the H-1B cap and allowing U.S. companies "to hire skilled workers based on labor market demands, not fixed and arbitrary quotas." The Partnership for New York noted in this report that six of its members were members of Trump's economic advisory committee.

Submission + - FTC Dismantles Two Huge Robocall Organizations

Trailrunner7 writes: Continuing its campaign against phone fraud operations, the FTC has dismantled two major robocall organizations that the commission alleges were making hundreds of millions of calls over the course of several years to consumers who were on the Do Not Call registry.

The FTC filed complaints against two separate groups of defendants, the leaders of which have both been involved in previous legal actions for robocalling operations. The defendants each controlled several different corporate entities that were involved in selling home security systems, extended auto warranties, and other products through repeated automated phone calls. Many of the calls were to numbers on the DNC list, a violation of the telemarketing regulations.

The two main defendants in the complaints are Justin Ramsey and Aaron Michael Jones, and in separate actions, they and many of their co-defendants have agreed to court-ordered bans on robocall activities and financial settlements. The FTC alleges that Ramsey directed an operation that made millions of robocalls a month.

Submission + - Squirrel 'Threat' to Critical Infrastructure

randomErr writes: The real threat to global critical infrastructure is not enemy states or organisations but squirrels. Cris Thomas has been tracking power cuts caused by animals since 2013. His Cyber Squirrel 1 project was set up to counteract what he called the "ludicrousness of cyber-war claims by people at high levels in government and industry", he told the audience at the Shmoocon security conference in Washington. Squirrels topped the list with 879 "attacks", followed by birds with 434 attacks and then snakes at 83 attacks.

Submission + - Buggy Domain Validation Forces GoDaddy to Revoke Certs (threatpost.com)

msm1267 writes: GoDaddy has revoked, and begun the process of re-issuing, new SSL certificates for more than 6,000 customers after a bug was discovered in the registrar’s domain validation process.

The bug was introduced July 29 and impacted fewer than two percent of the certificates GoDaddy issued from that date through yesterday, said vice president and general manager of security products Wayne Thayer.

“GoDaddy inadvertently introduced the bug during a routine code change intended to improve our certificate issuance process,” Thayer said in a statement. “The bug caused the domain validation process to fail in certain circumstances.”

GoDaddy said it was not aware of any compromises related to the bug.

Submission + - Microsoft Anti-Porn Workers Sue Over PTSD (thedailybeast.com)

An anonymous reader writes: When former Microsoft employees complained of the horrific pornography and murder films they had to watch for their jobs, the software giant told them to just take more smoke breaks, a new lawsuit alleges. Members of Microsoft’s Online Safety Team had “God-like” status, former employees Henry Soto and Greg Blauert allege in a lawsuit filed on Dec. 30. They “could literally view any customer’s communications at any time.” Specifically, they were asked to screen Microsoft users’ communications for child pornography and evidence of other crimes. But Big Brother didn’t offer a good health care plan, the Microsoft employees allege. After years of being made to watch the “most twisted” videos on the internet, employees said they suffered severe psychological distress, while the company allegedly refused to provide a specially trained therapist or to pay for therapy. The two former employees and their families are suing for damages from what they describe as permanent psychological injuries, for which they were denied worker’s compensation. “Microsoft applies industry-leading, cutting-edge technology to help detect and classify illegal images of child abuse and exploitation that are shared by users on Microsoft Services,” a Microsoft spokesperson wrote in an email. “Once verified by a specially trained employee, the company removes the image, reports it to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, and bans the users who shared the images from our services. We have put in place robust wellness programs to ensure the employees who handle this material have the resources and support they need.” But the former employees allege neglect at Microsoft’s hands.

Submission + - Second Ukraine Power Outage Linked to Russian Hackers (securityledger.com)

chicksdaddy writes: A December power outage in the city of Kiev in December has been linked to hacking activity by groups believed to be working on behalf of the government of Russia, according to published reports. (https://securityledger.com/2017/01/second-ukraine-power-outage-linked-to-russian-hackers/)

Russian hacking crews were behind a brief power outage at the Pivnichna remote power transmission facility last month, using software based attacks to shut down the remote terminal units (RTUs) that control circuit breakers, causing a power outage for about an hour. Hacking crews appear to be using the Ukraine as a test bed to hone skills that could be used against other adversaries, according to Marina Krotofil, a security researcher for Honeywell Industrial Cyber Security Labs, the website Dark Reading reported on Tuesday.

Speaking at the S4 Conference in Miami on Tuesday (http://www.cvent.com/events/s4x17), Krotofil said that the outage at Pivnichna was part of a month-long campaign by Russian hacking groups that included attacks on railways and other critical infrastructure. While not intended to cripple the country, the attacks were designed to sow confusion and chaos, she said.

Research was conducted by Information Systems Security Partners (ISSP) (https://www.issp.ua/contact.php?l=en), a Ukraine firm. Speaking to the conference via a pre-recorded video, Oleksii Yasynskyi, head of research at the company, said that the attacks were the work of more than one cyber criminal group that worked in concert with each other. Attacks against Ukraine critical infrastructure and other interests began over the summer, ISSP said, with spear phishing attacks directed at a Ukraine bank.

Submission + - Hamas 'Honey Trap' Dupes Israeli Soldiers (securityweek.com)

wiredmikey writes: The smartphones of dozens of Israeli soldiers were hacked by Hamas militants pretending to be attractive young women online, an Israeli military official said Wednesday. Using fake profiles on Facebook with alluring photos, Hamas members contacted the soldiers via groups on the social network, luring them into long chats, the official told journalists on condition of anonymity.

Dozens of the predominantly lower-ranked soldiers were convinced enough by the honey trap to download fake applications which enabled Hamas to take control of their phones, according to the official.

Submission + - Why You Shouldn't Trust Geek Squad (networkworld.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Orange County Weekly reports that Best Buy's "Geek Squad" repair technicians routinely search devices brought in for repair for files that could earn them $500 reward as FBI informants. This revelation came out in a court case, United States of America v. Mark A. Rettenmaier. Rettenmaier is a prominent Orange County physician and surgeon who took his laptop to the Mission Viejo Best Buy in November 2011 after he was unable to start it. According to court records, Geek Squad technician John "Trey" Westphal found an image of "a fully nude, white prepubescent female on her hands and knees on a bed, with a brown choker-type collar around her neck." Westphal notified his boss, who was also an FBI informant, who alerted another FBI informant — as well as the FBI itself. The FBI has pretty much guaranteed the case will be thrown out by its behavior, this illegal search aside. According to Rettenmaier's defense attorney, agents conducted two additional searches of the computer without obtaining necessary warrants, lied to trick a federal magistrate judge into authorizing a search warrant for his home, then tried to cover up their misdeeds by initially hiding records. Plus, the file was found in the unallocated "trash" space, meaning it could only be retrieved by "carving" with sophisticated forensics tools. Carving (or file carving) is defined as searching for files or other kinds of objects based on content, rather than on metadata. It's used to recover old files that have been deleted or damaged. To prove child pornography, you have to prove the possessor knew what he had was indeed child porn. There has been a court case where files found on unallocated space did not constitute knowing possession because it's impossible to determine who put the file there and how, since it's not accessible to the user under normal circumstances.

Submission + - Sears Agrees to Sell Craftsman Brand to Stanley Black & Decker for $900 Mill (marketwatch.com)

artmancc writes: You've probably got a couple of Craftsman tools in your kit. Maybe you got one for Christmas. The brand—famous for hand tools with a lifetime guarantee—is being sold as battered retailer Sears announced plans to shutter 150 stores. Sears may be in pretty rough shape, but Craftsman has been a good deal for the company. According to Bloomberg, Sears acquired Craftsman in 1927, paying just $500 for it.Meanwhile, at CES, Sears unveiled a Bluetooth-enabled riding mower and tool chest.

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It is masked but always present. I don't know who built to it. It came before the first kernel.

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