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Comment Re:Seems legit... (Score 1) 83

Ross Ulbricht is serving life in prison building a website to buy and sell shit that should be legal (well, most of it) anyway.

Didn't he try to have someone murdered?

If that was the case why wasn't he convicted of 1st degree murder? Honest question....

I believe in innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. The charges that he was *CONVICTED* of do _NOT_ warrant a life sentence. If he had been convicted of 5 attempts at murder for hire, THAT would warrant a life sentence. You can't (well obviously you can, or he wouldn't have gotten life) sentence someone based on what you THINK they did. The sentencing should be based on the crimes they were charged and convicted of.

But I'm a Libertarian, and I will be feeling the Johnson come November, so what do I know....

Comment Seems legit... (Score 1) 83

So, they want to kill Snowden -- or at the very least lock him away for life, and he is an American hero.

Ross Ulbricht is serving life in prison building a website to buy and sell shit that should be legal (well, most of it) anyway.

Hillary Clinton commits treason, and goes free.

But this dude, sells military secrets to the Russians, and 10 years.... yep ... seems legit to me.

Microsoft

Ask Slashdot: Would You Recommend Updating To Windows 10? 982

Plenty of users are skeptical about upgrading to Windows 10. While they understand that Microsoft's newest desktop operating system comes with a range of interesting features, they are paranoid about the repeated update fiascos that have spoiled the experience for many users. Reader Quantus347 writes: Whenever I think of Windows 10 these days I, like so many others out there, immediately feel a swell of rage over the heavy-handed way the "upgrade" has been forced on me and so many others. I had to downgrade one of my computers that installed windows 10 over a weekend I was away, and as a result, I have been fending off the update ever since. I find myself wondering if Windows 10 is actually that bad. With the end of the "free" upgrade period quickly coming to an end, my fiscally conservative side is starting to overwhelm my fear and distrust of all things new, and I'm wondering if it's time to take the leap. I've been burned too many times for being an early adopter of something that proved to be an underdeveloped product, but Windows 10 has been around for long enough that I'm wondering if it might have it's kinks worked out.

So I ask you, Slashdot, what are your experiences with Windows 10 itself, aside from the auto-upgrade nonsense? How does it measure up to its predecessors, and is it a worthwhile OS in its own right?
Microsoft

Microsoft Needs To Fix Skype (theverge.com) 224

It's no secret that Microsoft has long stopped caring about Skype for Linux. But the VoIP and instant messaging service isn't exactly working well on other platforms either. Microsoft reporter and critic Tom Warren lists a number of issues he continues to face on Skype. These issues include infrequent restarts, too many update prompts, and just having to deal with the unimpressive user interface that Skype throws at everyone's face. "I'm not sure what Microsoft has done to Skype, but it sucks now," he writes. Warren adds: Recently, friends and family have started experiencing some of the many issues I experience, including calls simply not connecting properly and every device in a home ringing non-stop even when a call is activated. Microsoft had promised to fix notifications blasting out to both your desktop machine and mobile, but I still frequently receive them in real-time on multiple devices. [...] I regularly have to restart the app just to make a call, or have my microphone detected correctly. This isn't a single device with driver issues, it's consistent across machines. I can't even scroll up and down on the contacts section of the Skype app with my trackpad, it just doesn't work. Those are bugs that should be easy to address, but Microsoft has also struggled to get the UI right with Skype.

Submission + - Rogue Source Code Repos Can Compromise Mac Security Due to Old Git Version (softpedia.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Recent Mac versions come bundled with a very old version of Git (2.6.4) that is vulnerable to two security flaws that allow attackers to execute code on the device when the user forks an Git repo holding "malicious" code. The problem is that users can't upgrade this Git repo, they can't change its runtime permissions, nor they can remove it because Apple blocks even root users from twiddling with some system-level programs.

"If you rely on machines like this, I am truly sorry. I feel for you," the researcher wrote on her blog. "I wrote this post in an attempt to goad them [Apple] into action because this is affecting lots of people who are important to me. They are basically screwed until Apple deigns to deliver a patched git unto them."

Comment Re:Incoming Security Errors (Score 4, Insightful) 86

you want to pull a js library from www.bar.com

Don't do that. You're introducing latency, you're violating the privacy of your visitors (bar.com knows about them) and you're putting them at risk, security-wise (bar.com gets 0wn3d? your visitors get 0wn3d as well). Don't be a lazy hacker and just spend the 2 minutes needed to store a local copy.

Submission + - Sony outage disables DASH devices, no ETA on a fix

Jack Greenbaum writes: In 2012 Sony closed the developer site for the DASH, their version of the Chumby platform. Sony never officially killed off the product, and they kept the back end servers on line, until recently at least. About two weeks ago DASH owners started seeing their devices fail with a cryptic error message "Unable to download the Control Panel (No download information available). Please restart your dash to try again." Sony acknowledges that the issue is at their end, but no ETA for a fix has been provided. The passionate DASH community is not pleased that Sony is being so quiet about a fix. One user even overslept for work because they depended on the alarm clock feature. Now every DASH is dead until Sony decides to not abandon its walled garden.

Submission + - Free Software supporter, Canadian MP David Graham speaks OSS in Government (linux-magazine.com)

ShawnX writes: If David Graham sounds familiar, you might know him better as cdlu (short for "confused debian linux user"). For years, cdlu was my colleague at Linux.com and Newsforge and well-known in Debian circles as well. Since then, he has been a presence in the back rooms of the Liberal Party until, in the federal election in October 2015, he was elected for the first time. He now describes himself (no doubt correctly) as "the only Member of Parliament to be in the Debian key ring."

Video of his discussion of using more Open Source in government can be seen here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

Comment Re:So just hand them encrypted data (Score 1) 190

Apple fighting the Three Letter Agencies over this

Naïve. More and more "telemetry" is built-in in Apple operating systems, making user spying "legitimate". The iDevices constantly call the mother ship and "backup" your data on the iCloud. The iDevices are running proprietary software so random hacker cannot really tell what it does (are the camera/microphone on? you're sure?).

Maybe you can prevent some of this data leak with a complex set of fine-tuned firewall rules, ensuring you never use anything else than WiFi you control. You'll be one in a million. At the end of the day, the phone's filesystem is encrypted, but who cares if most/all of the sensitive data already has escaped away from it?

Comment Where's my tinfoil hat? (Score 4, Insightful) 610

I wouldn't be surprised if this was nothing more than a joint PR stunt to mislead people into assuming privacy on their cellphone so they wouldn't be afraid to use it for sensitive information. Government has nothing to win by disclosing they have a backdoor, neither does the cellphone manufacturer. Even thinking lo-fi decryption, how long must the passcode be before brute-forcing gets more inconvenient for the government than for the user?

Comment Re: Anything but Windows... (Score 1) 160

I don't really consider myself an ideologist (evangelist?) when it comes to operating systems -- or at least I didn't. I had used an MS OS on my PCs since DOS 2.11 up to and including Windows 7. At first I used MS because there was no reasonable alternative -- there was so much that you HAD to have Windows for. When XP came out, I used it because I liked it. Same for Vista, and then Win 7. When 8 came out, I decided it was time to get my mouth of the MS teat. What I found was that I could accomplish my normal "consumer" tasks with ANY OS. GNU/Linux, *BSD, OS X, Android, iOS, etc...etc... The world had become OS agnostic *finally*. It is a real shame that most people still think they NEED an MS OS. Errrr -- nope. For the average consumer you can use any OS you want. Hell, for most people they will find that Android or iOS will serve them better. I have a wireless charger, wireless display, BT keyboard/mouse. I plop my phone on the charger and it pairs up with everything, and that is what I use for 95% of my computing needs. When I need to do development work, I have a workstation (running Mint) that I use VNC to connect to.

TL;DR: Except for a few enterprise applications, you NO LONGER need Windows -- PERIOD! I wish more companies would offer their products without an OS.

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