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Submission + - Public Transit CEOs Highlight Urgent Need to Invest in (publictransportation.org)

mytransponwire99 writes:

Today, CEOs of large, mid-size and small public transportation systems sounded the alarm for the urgent need to increase infrastructure investment in one of America's most valuable assets – its public transportation systems. The national press conference call was a part of this year's National Infrastructure Week (NIW), which is being held May 16 – 23.

The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) cited an $86 billion backlog in deferred maintenance and replacement needs with more than 40 percent of buses and 25 percent of rail transit assets in marginal or poor condition, according to the latest data from 2013. At the same time, with ridership increasing by 37 percent since 1995, public transit systems are challenged to increase service and capacity.

“After decades of inadequate investment, the American public transportation infrastructure is crumbling,” said American Public Transportation Association (APTA) Chair Valarie J. McCall, who serves on the board of the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority (GCRTA). “This neglect demands attention at all levels of government so that public transit can continue to help grow communities and businesses.”

“As public transportation has experienced tremendous growth over the last two decades, public transit systems are struggling to maintain aging and outdated infrastructure while at the same time being challenged to expand capacity,” said APTA Acting President and CEO Richard White. “While Congress's passage of the federal FAST Act was a step in the right direction, the job is still not done because we are woefully behind in investing in our infrastructure. Estimates to meet current national public transportation demand will require a capital investment of $43 billion annually over six years by all levels of government. Currently, the U.S. invests $17.7 billion annually.”

A number of other public transportation agencies nationwide are participating in NIW as members of APTA, which is an affiliate member. National Infrastructure Week is the largest, most diverse, non-partisan coalition of organizations dedicated to strengthening America by rebuilding the nation's infrastructure. This year's fourth annual National Infrastructure Week brings together America's business, labor and policy-making leadership, and it includes more than 100 affiliate organizations from all sectors of America's economy and society.


Comment Re:Misandry (Score 1) 291

> Because of patriarchy, males are the dominant gender, and therefore it is not possible to be sexist against them. Somehow, they managed to make females the minority, even though there's more females than males. This applies similarly to race and sexuality.

You make it out as if it is a man against women thing, which it is not. It is about a society, which has internalised a male dominant role. Strangely enough, that does include women.

Many men profit from that, but also some men suffer from the very same system too. If you are a geek, and were looked down upon in school, because you were not the strong alpha male sporty man, then you have experienced part of that. Except that now, if you are working as a tech, earning a fair salary, you fit into the expectations again. Or If you are a father, who does want to parent your children instead of leaving it to your wife, then you experience it most likely too.

And that pressure, which is placed on you to conform to expected roles in society is coming from women and men, from your friends and family. No one is putting a gun to your breast, but you will hear more likely critical comments, instead of hearing support as when you confirm your "expected role"

Personally, I think that is worth changing, because I do not like experiencing that, and I do not want others experience more extreme forms of prejudice
  and that having more diversity in deciding positions (and others too) is a necessary part of breaking those prejudices.

Comment Re:Translation (Score 3) 255

If you are running into that issue often, consider the Pimpl-pattern.

As always, C++ doesn't take the decision away from you. If you cannot live with the overhead in runtime from one pointer indirection, you have to live with the other downside.

From my standpoint and experience, most compile time issues were due to people putting things into the headers out of convenience.
In order to save some forward declarations or pimpl implementations, things were put into the header, which caused constant recompiles,and long compile times.

Comment Re:Germany not responsible for call recordings (Score 5, Informative) 170

Also the same article states that
* they were not targeting either officials, but the party they were happening to call.
* and were ordered to delete the records, as soon as the involved parties were identified.

Sounds not quite like hiring a double-agent from an allied secret service.

Comment Re:So... (Score 2) 615

Even if would take your explanation, what kind of mindset would shorten "this lousy excuse for a science" to "science"?

> On the other hand, the entire Heartland anti-AGW fund is smaller than the one bribe, er, "grant" paid to one NASA administrator, and a tiny drop in the bucket compared to the various government pro-AGW propaganda expenditures.

Taking into account the amount of factual results produce, I would say, the Heartland Institute receives a disproportionate amount of money.

Science, it works in the sense, that for example, that it allows us to produce rockets, which got us to the moon.
If the Heartland Institute produces something similar, then I would consider it putting it in the same league as a single NASA administrator.

Comment Re:I hate to say it, but... (Score 1) 631

With the same application mix, an even distribution of load is not a good sign: You have to wake the sleeping CPUs more often, so they can't switch them to a deeper sleep mode, and probably, the scheduler is switching the threads between processors, which means more cache misses.

So, the load graph alone is not a good indicator. Of course, that doesn't make your observation any less valid.

Comment Re:What? (Score 1) 345

Exactly for that reason, proving is done by deductive reasoning, not by testing.
You are working on a different abstraction level.

For proving, the number of variables or configurations are not a sensible measure of complexity.
There are seemingly simple equations, which haven't been proven for decades or even centuries,
and there are equations with an infinite number of scalars, which can take an infinite number of values,
which are well understood and proven from several different angles and used by undergrad students every day.

Comment Re:What? (Score 1, Insightful) 345

The same way it doesn't "take 100 years to" write code, which takes "every possible code path and input" in account,
it doesn't take it to verify it. Discovering an algorithm might take 100 years, but not writing the code.
Those are separate problems and usually one does the first, not the latter. Especially not in the cited case.

Writing correct code is about implementing an algorithm, which already considers "every possible code path and input"
and implementing it correctly. Software verification is purely checking, whether the written code matches the algorithm
is tedious and time-consuming and error prone in itself, but only takes a simple factor more time, which it took to write the code.
Automated verification is a totally different beast, because there is provably no algorithm for it.

To my understanding, that is the quintessence of the Gödel incompleteness theorems:
There are things, which are intractable for automated systems, which aren't for humans.

The size of the "solution space" is mainly important for testing, which seemed to have failed in the cited case.

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