Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. ×

Comment Re:Gartner "analysts" (Score 2) 91

Proves the worth of analysts. Gartner is just a Microsoft shill.

I'm assuming you're talking about Gartner's prediction that Windows Phone would overtake iPhone in 2015?

Whilst analysts have a tendency to get very little right, in fairness to Gartner, they probably weren't expecting Microsoft to reboot the platform twice and, in both times, leave all their previous users high and dry on the old OS.

Comment Re: Wireless charging now? (Score 1) 79

Apple pay is innovation? Now I need $1000 device to pay for $15 bill instead of free credit card that is 1/100 of the weight and 1/4 of the size and merchant has to give Apple 30% for the privilege. Who do you think pays for that 30% in the end?

The merchant isn't charged anything beyond their usual card processing fees. Apple's fee comes from the card issuer which is a percentage of their interchange fee. The 30% you speak of is for apps in the App Store and isn't remotely related to the fees around Apple Pay.

You probably should have prefixed your rant with an admission that you don't have the remotest clue how Apple Pay works.

Comment Re:Wireless charging now? (Score 1) 79

Hmm, several years behind the opposition with sales of those products doing very well.

I don't have a problem with Apple being late to a game, provided that what they do bring is measurably better/useful/practical in some way.

Apple Pay did that, whereas Maps and Music did not. Where wireless charging sits on this spectrum remains to be seen.

Comment Wireless (Score 1) 143

The biggest issue I have with wireless charging is that with a wired cable you're limited to plugging your phone into a cable which is plugged into a wall socket about 1-2m away. With wireless charging you're limited to putting your phone into a dock which has a cable which is plugged into a wall socket about 1-2m away.

As an added bonus, it charges much slower and costs about 12x more than a simple cable (even Lightning ones, provided you don't buy from Apple).

Unless someone can come up with a way to make electricity flow through the air (yeah, I know, physics) or some way for you enable full surface wireless charging on existing tables then I'm not convinced this is going to go anywhere beyond "nice, but not entirely essential, to have".

Comment Re:"Up to $10" (Score 1) 99

In the end, especially in light of the "no proof of purchase required", everyone will probably get $1.43 per drive, or less. Meanwhile, those driving the class action suit will pull in $25M, or more.

On the bright side, the next time companies think about doing something similar, they'll have 25 million reasons as to why it's not a such a good idea.

Comment Re:Does Ireland wan't the money? (Score 1) 174

The very LAST thing Ireland really wants is to enforce this law. For good reason. Right now they get a bit of the cake, but they get a bit of the cake from everyone because every company, from Apple to Amazon to MS to Google, is hiding in their tax shelter.

If they now actually fold (and yes, that would be Ireland folding to EU pressure), what reason is there for them to stay in Ireland? The weather?

They still have the lowest corporate tax in the EU at 12.5% Apple would just have to pay that instead of 0.02%.

FTFY.

The whole point of this investigation was that it was only Apple was getting the special 0.02% tax deal.

Everyone else in Ireland was taxed at 12.5%.

Comment Monitor (Score 1) 172

It's not clear exactly how Microsoft will detect inactivity, but it's possible the company could use Windows Hello-compatible machines or detect idle activity and lock the machine accordingly.

My monitor at work has the ability to detect if someone is sitting within a certain distance from it. If no-one is in range then after a couple of minutes it would automatically turn off the screen. The distance can be defined in the settings.

I'm sure there are a small number of people on here (who will likely comment) whose working patterns means that this wouldn't work for them - but it seemed to work for the 500 odd people we have on the floor.

Comment Re:I Love my sonos, but... (Score 2) 23

Ok, you want to be a leader? How about coming out with a well thought out product every decade or so?

I love Sonos too, but their current line up is several years old. Have speaker and wireless technologies not moved on at all?

Not to mention the state of the app. Despite the open letter from their CEO over a year ago accepting that they might have missed the boat on streaming technologies and need to catch up there is still no AirPlay support. No Chromecast audio either. No bluetooth. If you're going to pay twice as much as the competition, then it would be nice if you could actually use your speakers with the main technologies out there.

But that's okay, because they've been concentrating on the local music capability right? For example, acknowledging that 4 people in the house might have completely different music tastes and do not want to merge their music library into one big pool? Nope, nothing has changed.

In the last couple of years they've launched their TruePlay app, added Apple Music and allowed Spotify users to control the music from the (superior) Spotify app. That doesn't seem to be very much to me.

Comment No duplication of functionality (Score 1) 232

"I don't want a watch that duplicates the function of my cell phone or computer,"

That requirement alone pretty much leaves you buying a nice Swiss analogue watch and, as a nerd, marveling at the technical feat of engineering that went into creating something that can keep time (and date) without the use of any electrical components.

Plus, it'll last a lifetime, the battery won't die out, can still be serviced many years from now, doesn't need to be charged every night, won't be rendered obsolete and will actually look nice on you.

Submission + - Buh-bye, H-1B's 1

DogDude writes: From the Washington Post: Trump and Sessions plan to restrict highly skilled foreign workers. Hyderabad says to bring it on.
"Trump has described H-1Bs as a “cheap labor program” subject to “widespread, rampant” abuse. Sessions co-sponsored legislation last year with Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) to effectively gut the program; Issa, a congressman with Trump’s ear, released a statement Wednesday saying he was reintroducing similar legislation called the Protect and Grow American Jobs Act."

Comment Re:Bigoted much? (Score 1) 404

Expelling diplomats and seizing property is outrageous behavior if it's believed that it was done for no reason.

Not really. What the administration did was actually pretty much the least retaliation they can do. On MSNBC, they asked an analyst what the actions were on a 1-to-10 scale and it was called a 1, maybe a 2.

There's not much else less severe that could have been done.

Comment Retaliation..again (Score 3, Insightful) 821

This is like groundhog day. Putin very likely struck out at Sec. Clinton because of the damage her claim that the 2011 elections in Russia were illegitimate. That claim from the United States, by the way, is effectively like what Russia is accused of doing in 2016 - interfering in national elections of a rival.

This is a fools game. Retaliating by interfering in Russian politics will simply invite more of the same. There is no sense of balance or proportionality here.

It would have been nice for the Obama administration to have done a policy change here at the end, that put some teeth into a rule that prohibits the United States from interferring in the elections or politics of any foreign nation. But of course that's not in the cards.

Slashdot Top Deals

The F-15 Eagle: If it's up, we'll shoot it down. If it's down, we'll blow it up. -- A McDonnel-Douglas ad from a few years ago

Working...