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Comment Re:Devil's advocacy (Score 1) 114

First, though Steam has sales. PlayStation Store also has sales. Second, console games have historically been more likely than PC games to support same-screen multiplayer with two to four gamepads, and if you have more than one gamer in the house, one copy of a $60 game that supports multiple gamepads is cheaper than three copies of a $30 game that requires a separate copy per player. Third, if everybody were to wait for the sale instead of buying in release month at full price, publishers would have no money to continue to fund development of high-production-value games.

Not to mention the fact that, unlike PC games, you can often find dirt-cheap used physical copies of console games on Amazon and other sites. A while back I bought a used copy of Battlefront for PS4 for $10 on Amazon. Good luck getting it for sale on PC for that price.

And even if you could, big Steam sales only come a few times a year and many devlopers don't even support Steam (including big names like EA and Ubisoft). By contrast, cheap used copies of console games can be found anytime.

Comment Re:so what? (Score 1) 114

Since PS4 and Xbox One have both adopted similar x86 architectures this generation and have similar hardware specs, the issue is largely moot now. Developing a game designed for both systems is pretty easy and so a developer would just be throwing away money if it just developed for one or the other.

Now as for Nintendo, on the other hand....

Comment Re:Since they determined autopilot wasn't to blame (Score 3, Interesting) 123

The problem is that, human nature being what it is, a lot of drivers will come to rely too much on autopilot and will stop paying attention just like this guy apparently did. That will cause a lot of crashes just by itself. This isn't DIRECTLY the fault of autopilot, but is rather an INDIRECT consequence of having it (combined with human nature).

Submission + - Zuckerberg sues hundreds of Hawaiians to force property sales to him. (msn.com)

mmell writes: Apparently, owning 700 acres of land in Hawaii isn't enough — Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook, has filed suit to force owners of several small parcels of land to sell to the highest bidder. The reason? These property owners are completely surrounded by Zuckerberg's land holdings and therefore have lawful easement to cross his property in order to get to theirs.

Many of these land owners have held their land for generations, but seemingly Mr. Zuckerberg can not tolerate their presence so close to his private little slice of paradise. Landowners such as these came to own their land when their ancestors were "given" the land as Hawaiian natives.

If successful in his "quiet title" court action, Mr. Zuckerberg will finally have his slice of Hawaii's beaches and tropical lands without having to deal with the pesky presence of neighbors who were on his land before he owned it. Who knew that Hawaiians were just another kind of Native Americans?

Comment Re:Don't call it a tablet? (Score 3, Insightful) 116

No One: "Oh, and could you also throw in a monthly fee for online multiplayer like Xbox Live and PSN, but make us use our iPhones for basic features that those services have provided for fifteen years now, like voice chat and matchmaking?"

Nintendo: "Yep, gotcha...."

No One: "And can you make it so we can't just transfer over all our Virtual Console games, so we have to buy them all over again?"

Nintendo: "We hear you. No problem."

Comment Re:I don't get it... but maybe I'm not supposed to (Score 2) 116

Games don't need to be played on powerful systems to be performant, pretty, and fun.

Man, I'm sick of that argument. Nintendo fans has been saying that for over 15 years now, and it's still just as silly as it was back when Nintendo basically gave up trying to compete with Sony.

Yes, you can still have fun with an old Pong console from 1977. But if you release it to compete with modern consoles, no one is going to pay $300 for it.

The core demographic of Nintendo lines are not children, they are families and 20-somethings that aren't into whatever the latest Call of Duty is.

No, their core demographics are kids and nostalgic adults who won't grow up.

It is important when discussing poignant points like you have presented that we understand that Nintendo sells most of their consoles at a profit while Xbox and Playstation have largely been subsidized, and yet Nintendo still sells.

Actually, from what I understand that hasn't been true for several years now. They've been losing money on the WiiU from the get-go. The 3DS and a big bankroll they had saved up has basically been keeping them afloat.

Comment Re:Sure... (Score 1) 116

What it really is is just a backdoor way for Nintendo to leave the console market, while saving face. They get to leave the console market while claiming that TECHNICALLY they didn't. Unfortunately, it will probably do damage to their handheld line too. But with Sony seemingly throwing in the towel in the handheld market, they don't have any real competition to exploit this weakness.

Submission + - California's bullet train is hurtling toward a multibillion-dollar overrun (latimes.com)

schwit1 writes: California’s bullet train could cost taxpayers 50% more than estimated — as much as $3.6 billion more. And that’s just for the first 118 miles through the Central Valley, which was supposed to be the easiest part of the route between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

A confidential Federal Railroad Administration risk analysis, obtained by the Times, projects that building bridges, viaducts, trenches and track from Merced to Shafter, just north of Bakersfield, could cost $9.5 billion to $10 billion, compared with the original budget of $6.4 billion.

The federal document outlines far-reaching management problems: significant delays in environmental planning, lags in processing invoices for federal grants and continuing failures to acquire needed property.

The California High-Speed Rail Authority originally anticipated completing the Central Valley track by this year, but the federal risk analysis estimates that that won’t happen until 2024, placing the project seven years behind schedule.

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