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Comment Re:Keep precious things in the house (Score 2) 303

First off a nod to nicolaiplum (giggle outhouse) and blankinthefill (giggle hollow-core) for great advice. However I feel compelled to give you a bit more detail. Second, congrats on living the dream :-)

Comfort:
The first and foremost piece of the comfort puzzle will be the air (temperature, humidity, air-quality, etc.). Basically you will want to make sure that your 12x20 office doesn't become a 12x20 coffin or swamp or oven.

Given the small internal volume you may want to consider an air-exchanger (google it) to move outside air inside without dramatically heating or cooling the interior (saves money, and you don't suffocate or suffer from ozone created by electronics). It may be a good idea to throw a filter on this system as well, to lower airborne particulates.

If you live where humidity is a thing, you may want to look into a dehumidifier (opposite tech if it is Manitoba in the winter or Arizona anytime, but be careful! You will want to have it controlled by some sort of a humidity meter as to not mess up your gear while protecting your sinuses).

You will also need some method of heating and/or cooling depending on your climate (90% sure this is going to be electric given that it is an out-building), so maybe look into "mini-split" systems as they are typically the most efficient (if the budget allows). Otherwise it will be important figure if you are in a heating or cooling zone, and how far into that definition you are.

Then we come to insulation. Insulation in the floor and ceiling are the most important. If you are having this built for you, you will likely end up with a "sealed envelope". This means that the air exchanger is a good idea, so you don't have to leave a window open. Insulation wise you can satisfy the tinfoil hat guys with a foil-foam-foil type insulation for cheap in the walls (it will need to be installed with an air gap on both side FYI). In the ceiling, go for max R-Value. Don't forget to insulate the floor if your winters are below freezing for more than a month.

Speaking of flooring... Carpet is typically the most comfortable as it provides some insulation as well as cushion, but is harder to maintain in an out-building (especially with the mud you mentioned). However, you can get a 2 for 1 with a hardfloor option (Pergo, Marmoleum, Tile, whatever) if you install radiant heating (cold floors in the summer don't suck). That also means no rolling pad

Lighting should be “warm” (2700k-ish) regardless of bulb type, but LEDs last the longest obviously. Go for at least 3 separate light sources including a desk lamp to give the most comfort. Given you are in software, I recommend at least one source of indirect lighting, putting lighting on a dimmer.

Lastly, although views are nice, you need to ask what motivates you personally. If you are a view guy (I am), then make sure you place the window so that it looks onto something awesome 365 year. Don't worry about glare, as you can always go low tech and tape a piece of cardboard or paper on the part of the window responsible. Or go high tech and install dimming windows. Or in-between and use horizontal blinds (which can come in insulated varieties BTW, help with the
Security:
Security is all about getting a human enough time to intervene with a proverbial shotgun, whether physical or digital. Otherwise it is a "deterrent", like not leaving your Rolex on the dash of your car, or having a firewall.

Door-wise go for insulated steel on a steel frame. Locks were already covered by “blankinthefill”. Make sure the hinges aren’t accessible from the outside, and that you have at least one burly dead-bolt. This implies that door swings in not out FYI. This is enough to frustrate your average tweaker. However a truly determined individual will just take a chainsaw to the wall. Don’t worry about “doubling up studs”, and just sheet it in plywood before the decorative siding. Or for a budget option, just use T1-11. Unless there is some unknown reason to make it literally bomb proof?

If you just want a ventilation window you can put it at least 6 above grade to require a ladder for intrusion, and/or use security glass. Alarm systems are only work if you are a) home, and b) willing to do something about it. This is because LEO response times are typically too long to do much but catch the laziest, or file a report ASAP.

If you are really worried about breaking and entering, you can always install some decorative bars on said window.

Remember, you are not building Fort Knox. That being said, it is a good idea for the end of your trenching to be under the building, so there are no obvious wires externally.

If you fear industrial espionage, then there are some additional steps. However, given that tweakers and script kiddies only pray on the slow and unwary, this should be sufficient. Unless they personally observe you schlepping high-value items into your fortress of solitude.

Good luck!

Comment Not a huge surprise... (Score 1) 837

I would like to call your attention to the following quote from a WP article from November 24, 2009 speaking to their decision to shutdown all of their national offices: "...Brauchli, a former foreign correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, acknowledged that "unquestionably there are advantages to having someone on the ground at times." But, he said, "We are not a national news organization of record serving a general audience. Nor are we a wire service or cable channel." Maintaining that The Post's strength is to report issues through a "Washington prism," Brauchli cited recent examples of education and economic reporters filing major dispatches from other cities to illustrate national trends..." (Original article: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/11/24/AR2009112403014.html ) I believe the telling bit is the "Washington Prism", or mouth piece of the very regimes which are being called out in the leaked information. In that light this comes as no surprise. Also the author is a "fellow" of AEI. To quote wikipedia "Some AEI scholars are considered to be some of the leading architects of the second Bush administration's public policy."

Comment Not a huge surprise... (Score 1) 837

I would like to call your attention to the following quote from a WP article from November 24, 2009 speaking to their decision to shutdown all of their national offices: "...Brauchli, a former foreign correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, acknowledged that "unquestionably there are advantages to having someone on the ground at times." But, he said, "We are not a national news organization of record serving a general audience. Nor are we a wire service or cable channel." Maintaining that The Post's strength is to report issues through a "Washington prism," Brauchli cited recent examples of education and economic reporters filing major dispatches from other cities to illustrate national trends..." (Original article: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/11/24/AR2009112403014.html ) I believe the telling bit is the "Washington Prism", or mouth piece of the very regimes which are being called out in the leaked information. In that light this comes as no surprise.

Submission + - Outlook Replacement 3

illeism writes: The company I work for is looking into going more open source. We have looked at Open Office for general office apps but there is no Outlook replacement with Open Office. The question here is, what are you guys using to replace Outlook for email, address books, calendars and other Outlook features?
Science

Submission + - Researchers Create Artificial Spider Silk Spinner (sciencedaily.com)

alex_guy_CA writes: "Scientists have been investigating how to mimic spider silk for years. The seemingly delicate threads actually have a tensile strength five times greater than steel, and the possibilities for using a similar material in everything from buildings to bridges to cars and even clothing, are practically infinite. The only problem is, the stuff seems to be impossible to replicate. However, researchers have uncovered a key aspect in how spiders make silk, and they may be one step closer to man-made spider silk.

According to Science Daily, scientists from the Technische Universitaet Muenchen and the University of Bayreuth have solved the question of how spiders form long, stable, elastic fibers from the proteins stored in their silk glands in seconds. The spider silk is comprised of protein chains linked with stable physical connections, and between these are unlinked areas that contribute to the elasticity — making the silk both strong and flexible. But the mystery behind the molecules are what allows them to be stored in close confinement inside the silk gland without linking up and clumping. The scientists were able to figure out the structure of a control element used in the formation of the spider silk, and now they may be able to soon replicate the way spiders form silk. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100512131511.htm"

Submission + - Hulu: HTML5 'doesn't yet meet our customers needs (engadget.com) 1

TheReal_sabret00the writes: Hulu rolled out an updated version of its video player today, but what you may not have noticed is that the company also took advantage of the occasion to briefly talk about HTML5. In a post on the Hulu blog (which has curiously since been pulled, though it remains in the RSS feed), Hulu's VP of Product Eugene Wei took a moment for an "aside on HTML5," in which he said that while Hulu continues to monitor developments on HTML5, "as of now it doesn't yet meet all of our customers' needs."
Linux

Submission + - New Visual Software Development Tool (lunduke.com) 1

TroysBucket writes: Illumination is a new tool for visually developing software. In an interesting twist, it takes the visual design of an application, and generates source code for the desired platform (currently Python/GTK, more planned such as Maemo & HTML5). Currently supports Linux, with plans for Windows and MacOS X.
Government

Submission + - Rough Justice for Terry Childs (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Deep End's Paul Venezia sees significant negative ramifications for IT admins in the wake of yesterday's guilty verdict for Terry Childs on a count of 'denial of serivce.' Assuming the verdict is correct, Venezia writes, 'shouldn't the letter of the law be applied to other "denial of service" problems caused by the city while they pursued this case? In particular, to the person or persons who released hundreds passwords in public court filings in 2008 for causing a denial of service for the city's widespread VPN services? After all, once the story broke that a large list of usernames and passwords had been released to the public, the city had to take down its VPN services for days while they reset every password and communicated those changes to the users.' Worse, if upheld on appeal, the verdict puts a vast number of IT admins at risk. 'There are suddenly thousands of IT workers all over the country that are now guilty of this crime in a vast number of ways. If the letter of the law is what convicted Terry Childs, then the law is simply wrong.'"

Submission + - Terry Childs Convicted. (ktvu.com)

dave596 writes: A jury has found Terry Childs, a former San Francisco Department of Technology employee accused of withholding the passwords to the city's main computer network in 2008, guilty of computer tampering.

The verdict was read in San Francisco Superior Court Tuesday afternoon.

After deliberating for nearly three days, the jury found Childs guilty of one felony count of computer tampering, and found true the allegation that the losses from the crime exceeded $200,000.

The trial spanned four months. Childs now faces a maximum of five years in prison at his sentencing.

Image

How To Find Bad Programmers 359

AmberShah writes "The job post is your potential programmer's first impression of your company, so make it count with these offputting features. There are plenty of articles about recruiting great developers, but what if you are only interested in the crappy ones?" I think much of the industry is already following these guidelines.

Comment Actually it does... (Score 1) 309

Yeah, you didn't read the article.... So to spell it out. Bacteria lives on seaweed (and is able to eat it directly, and get energy from it). Japanese eats the seaweed, and thus the bacteria. The bacteria in the intestines swap notes with their cousins. Now part of the population in the intestine can do the digesting the seaweed trick. We have bacteria in and on our bodies. This bacteria outnumbers the cells we call "us". Most of this bacteria actually does a job, such as reducing inflammation around broken skin, or helping you digest your food. In the article, they were talking about gene transfer between bacteria living on the seaweed, and bacteria now found to be living in the intestines of some Japanese. Furthermore, current research suggests that humans "inherit" their population of intestinal flora from their mothers. So nowhere did anyone talk about phages, or any other virus. Accept you. I am saddened that a sufficient volume of accurate information, completely off topic, is "insightful".

Submission + - Chip and Pin Credit Card Attack Discovered (bbc.co.uk)

Fullers writes: The BBC reports that scientists from Cambridge University have discovered an attack for the 'Chip and Pin's system used to verify credit and debit cards in Europe. The hack appears to be a simple man-in-the-middle attack, using a laptop to allow the verification of any random pin for purchases. They are now working on miniaturizing the device to the size of a remote control.

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