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Comment No. This is an unprecedented shit in nothing. (Score 0, Flamebait) 983

It is a remotely-controlled device, jury rigged for a purpose that is not at all its use.

I know people will become uncontrollably outraged about this, but it's a standoff weapon. Just like a spear, a bow and arrow, an explosive tossed through a door or window, a gun, or even a vehicle employed as a weapon.

The legal standard for lethal force is the same. Beware of academics or other commentators who will claim this is some kind of new territory for which there is no legal standard and that we have no idea how to approach.

But by all means: pretend this is an "Unprecedented Shift in Policing" instead of an improvisation under nightmarish circumstances.

Comment Re:TMobile.... (Score 2) 145

It really depends on your location of use and how far from interstates you travel, when you do.

In my case, there is absolutely NO coverage for T-mobile at my lake home on any provider except Verizon. Considering we spend ~40% of our summer months there, this is a necessity.

We also travel, by car, over 3500 miles each summer on a road trip. With Verizon I have never been out of coverage; however, AT&T and T-mobile cannot keep pace--not even close.

Comment Re:Really? (Score 1) 32

While all of your points are quite valid, there is definitely a lot of community on IG and, as someone who recently stopped using it due to the changes to the feed planned by Facebook, I definitely miss seeing local photographers sharing their work and helping each other get better at their craft.

Comment Re:I'm curious... (Score 1) 155

Well, a few reasons really:

1. I don't like ads and I can adlbock on mobile web but not as easily on iOS for apps (if at all) which is why they are doing this in the first place.

2. I don't want to download unnecessary applications which take up storage I want to use on other things.

3. I don't see the need to have two different applications to interact on the same platform.

Comment Why the political ending? (Score 2) 224

From the article:

Much closer to home, Musk was also asked about the U.S. presidential election, a topic on which he was noticeably less animated.

Without saying anything about Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton specifically, he said, "I don't think it's the finest moment in our democracy."

I wish there was more context given here. Does he feel this way because of their stance on space exploration/funding/etc or simply because he doesn't like their other political stances?

If it is indeed, the latter, if it's going to be included in an article, I really wish they had dug in deeper and published his response, rather than just including Hillary and Trump in the article for their SEO value.

Comment I've seen more BSODs with W10 (Score 4, Interesting) 982

While my two main machines are Macs, I manage around 15 Windows VMs and touch every new employee laptop deployed in our environment.

Through this, at least on the hardware we use here and the VMs managed under Hyper-V, I have personally witnessed more BSODs on W10 than any version of Windows after the Windows2000 days.

When Windows is required and when it's up to me, we don't use any W10 images and disable the upgrade paths for the users and based on this experience, I recommend no but YMMV.

Comment Re:Nobody wants thinner and lighter. (Score 1) 238

I do what is arguably 'real work'; however, I don't use my local machine to do it because the work I do is not something which can sit on a desktop or especially a laptop.

I just don't think it's worth it to carry around a tank when you could just connect remotely to these machines to do your work.

YMMV.

Comment Re:welcome to 1993 (Score 2) 67

I think you meant: Welcome to Slashdot

You're complaining about this? Seriously? If you have alternatives to this, by all means, employ them; it's great that you choose to do so (something we all fully support), but the vast majority of people like having easy options to use, even if they're subscription based.

Submission + - Prominent civil liberties expert says he and Snowden were wrong on NSA 1

An anonymous reader writes: Last week, Geoffrey Stone, a longtime civil liberties stalwart, Constitutional scholar at the University of Chicago, and member of the National Advisory Council of the American Civil Liberties Union, moderated a live discussion with Edward Snowden from Russia. As a member of the President’s Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies, Stone was given unfettered access to unfettered access to our national security apparatus, and told the NSA what he thought. This week, Stone offered more detail on his own findings that only someone with direct knowledge can provide: "So before I began the work on the review group, my general view was that, from what I learned in the media, the NSA had run amok and created these programs without appropriate approval or authorization or review. And whatever I thought of the merits of the programs, my assumption was that it was illegitimate because it didn't have appropriate review and approval. What surprised me the most was that this was completely wrong. [...] The more I worked with the NSA, the more respect I had for them as far as staying within the bounds of what they were authorized to do. And they were careful and had a high degree of integrity. My superficial assumption of the NSA being a bad guy was completely wrong. [...] I came to the view that they were well intentioned, that they were designed in fact to collect information for the purpose of ferreting out potential terrorist plots both in the U.S. and around the world and that was their design and purpose." Stone provided detail and examples, including rationale and justifications for the review group's findings, and concluded that Snowden "was unduly arrogant, didn't understand the limitations of his own knowledge and basically decided to usurp the authority of a democracy."

Comment In my experience with my son... (Score 4, Insightful) 40

So is Minecraft really all that?

I was always into computers, writing programs in BASIC on my Commodore Vic20 when I was barely old enough to read/write. When my son showed little to no interest in computers, I was disappointed but supportive in endeavors he did seem to enjoy which had corollaries to my obsession w/computers such as lego, puzzles, engineering, science, etc.

When he expressed interest in Minecraft, I was admittedly skeptical as I see most kids just playing it as a game. However, my son uses it like computer Legos, building shit over and over again and exploring the virtual world of a 6 year old.

Starting with this, I hope he continues to learn about items which interest him through his directly manipulatable world just like I did through my own when I was his age. While like any tool may not be the best for every child to learn, it has begun to pay off and allow him to grow and develop educationally w/o him wanting to play it only as a mindless game.

So no, it's not "all that" but it's certainly better than him watching TV or only playing games on a tablet or game system.

Comment Re:Last we will hear of that.... (Score 1) 255

I was referring to the iOS 7 device, which they can easily unlock/break (see Section I), but declined to do so this time (the EDNY case).

The combination of iOS 8/9 with iPhone 6 and newer (HW security enclave) is designed to not be able to be broken by Apple, even if it wanted to.

That's not to say that nothing is breakable, ever; it's all about the level of effort required and whether or not one can bypass the crypto altogether.

Comment Re:Last we will hear of that.... (Score 1) 255

No, the phone is running iOS 9 -- this is the San Bernardino phone. The phone running iOS 7 was the case in the Eastern District of New York -- which of course Apple's own law enforcement compliance statement says it will unlock when presented with a warrant, but I guess it didn't feel like it this time.

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