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Comment I'm from the past (Score 1) 314

I'm here to let you know it's on it's way. It was lost in Montana for awhile, and the crossing the Rockies was a bit rough. But it should be getting to you any day now!

The only thing left is to confirm your current address. Unfortunately, I can only time travel forward so letting them know where to send it in 1884 may be a challenge.

Comment Re:"Gig Economy" indeed! (Score 2) 111

I'm more cynical. I think they are pulling a page from Walmart in an attempt to pay less in employee benefits and unemployment insurance. Just like the other companies that abuse part time status, people will be pressured into working more than part time off the books.

Boss :"Sorry Bill, but we're going to have to let you go. You are the least productive team member."

Bill: "But... but... they all work 50 hrs a week!"

Boss: "Thats not what their time cards say. They are clearly working 30hrs a week, same as you."

Comment Re:Never fails to astound... (Score 4, Interesting) 211

So much time spent working out how to design, construct, and replicate just close enough to make the sale...

I doubt there was little if any NRE (Non-Reoccurring Engineering) costs involved in the construction of these iPhonies. The price alone strongly suggests the most likely explanation is that the Chinese manufactures making the genuine iPhone, are running their production lines on the side, without Apple's consent.

Apple has handed them the specifications and all the manufacturer has to do is build a few thousand more than what Apple orders. The bootleg manufacturers don't even have to pay for things like molds or automation setup costs. They then fill in any missing pieces (such as software or mute slider switches) with the cheapest thing they can get.

You probably would be surprised at how often this happens with consumer goods built in China.

Media

Danish DRM Breaker Turns Himself In To Test Backup Law 466

coaxial writes "In Denmark, it's legal to make copies of commercial videos for backup or other private purposes. It's also illegal to break the DRM that restricts copying of DVDs. Deciding to find out which law mattered, Henrik Anderson reported himself for 100 violations of the DRM-breaking law (he ripped his DVD collection to his computer) and demanded that the Danish anti-piracy Antipiratgruppen do something about it. They promised him a response, then didn't respond. So now he's reporting himself to the police. He wants a trial, so that the legality of the DRM-breaking law can be tested in court."
Google

Google May Limit Free News Access 236

You know how, if you want to read a paywalled newspaper article, you can just paste its title into Google News and get a free pass? Those days may be coming to an end. Reader Captian Spazzz writes: "It looks like Google may be bowing to pressure from folks like News Corp.'s Rupert Murdoch. What I don't understand is what prevents the websites themselves from enforcing some limit. Why make Google do it?" (Danny Sullivan explains how they could do that.) "Newspaper publishers will now be able to set a limit on the number of free news articles people can read through Google, the company has announced. The concession follows claims from some media companies that the search engine is profiting from online news pages. Publishers will join a First Click Free programme that will prevent web surfers from having unrestricted access. Users who click on more than five articles in a day may be routed to payment or registration pages."
Biotech

Scientists Build a Smarter Rat 302

destinyland writes "Scientists have engineered a more intelligent rat, with three times the memory length of today's smartest rats. Reseachers bred transgenic over-expression of the NR2B gene, which increased communication between the rat's memory synapses. Activating a crucial brain receptor for just a fraction of a second longer produces a dramatic effect on memory, as proven by the rat's longer memories of the path through a maze."
Biotech

Virus-Like Particles May Mean Speedier Flu Vaccines 80

We've been talking a lot lately about flu vaccines. Now an anonymous reader sends us to a Technology Review piece on two human trials involving so-called virus-like particle vaccines, which promise to be much faster to churn out than traditional vaccines. (Here's a single-page version but without the useful illustration.) VLP vaccines use a protein shell, grown in either plant or insect cells, that look just like real viruses to the body's immune system but that contain no influenza RNA genetic material. A company called Medicago grows its VLPs in transgenic tobacco plants, while another called Novavax uses "immortalized" cells taken from caterpillars. Providing they pass safety muster, both techniques should be able to produce an influenza vaccine more quickly than current methods, using just the DNA of the virus.

Comment Re:The only prudent thing to do with these things. (Score 4, Informative) 185

Initially I was a little confused about the cable modem not being in bridge mode and having an admin interface at all. After RTFA, this vulnerability is only for SMC router/modem combo devices from TW. There was no mention of the Motorola cable modem I have from TW. The Motorola cable modems are acting as a bridge already because my router gets the lease to the public IP.

So apparently no worries regarding this vulnerability for me, but this certainly sucks for 65K other people.

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