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Comment Stall them! (Score 1) 120

Oh, absolutely. I especially love doing this with the "PC support" scammers. It's easy to take forever to walk to the computer (that I'm actually working on the whole time), boot it up, fumble my way to and through the whole Event Viewer flim-flam, and so on, with all the stalling tactics Oligonicella suggests. Eventually I get bored, tell them I need to get my son to help me, and put the phone down. I've been tempted to finish with a scream or a police whistle, but I'm afraid my condo neighbors wouldn't appreciate that.

Comment The real problem isn't the watchlist! (Score 1) 350

I agree with your final statement -- it absolutely deserves debate. "What this is about" is that that debate should be going on in the Senate, and it isn't. And focusing on the watchlist question is missing the real problem in another way: There are 4 (four) gun measures up for debate, not all of which have anything to do with the watchlist, and the Senate is refusing to debate (note: I did not say "pass") any of them. Despite the fact that the vast majority of polled Americans disagree.

Comment crappy summary (Score 4, Informative) 183

To say the "new evidence surfaced from Warner Music" is rather misleading. The plaintiffs independently found the evidence; what they got from Warner had the evidence "blurred out". Here's the summary from TFA:

"(1) Warner/Chappell Music (who claims to hold the copyright for the publishing, if it exists) suddenly "found" a bunch of relevant documents that it was supposed to hand over in discovery last year, but didn't until just a few weeks ago, and (2) a rather important bit of information in one of those new documents was somewhat bizarrely "blurred out." This led the plaintiffs go searching for the original, and discover that it undermines Warner Music's arguments, to the point of showing that the company was almost certainly misleading the court. Furthermore, it definitively shows that the work was and is in the public domain."

Warner, of course, denies that conclusion. rsilvergun may be right, but the date of the songbook relative to the date of the "copyright" and of the changes to copyright law would seem to weaken Warner's argument fatally.

Comment Apology shows questionable understanding (Score 1) 190

I read the exchange on Ars, and I'm not convinced IMAX has properly understood their egregious error. Their apology said, "... in this situation we acted too quickly without truly understanding the reference to our brand. ... we will try to be better at taking compliments ...". That reads to me like they still think the take-down request would have been appropriate if the reference was uncomplimentary. But, as Ars pointed in their open response to the request, it would still have been an inappropriate action in that case for many reasons; and so the IMAX lawyer was (and is?) demonstrating unforgivable ignorance or disregard of the relevant laws.

Comment "reatlowing beacons"??? (Score 2) 49

Quoting from the Planetary.org article: "While there are countless questions about Ceres, the most popular now seems to be what the bright spots are. It is impossible not to be mesmerized by what appear to be reatlowing beacons, shining out across the cosmic seas from the uncharted lands ahead." "reatlowing" doesn't appear to be a real word, and I can't figure out what was meant. Any ideas?

Comment Not always hilarious... (Score 3, Informative) 185

If you find it hilarious, you've been fortunate. I tried opening a online CD with Nationwide Bank by calling them, and they asked me questions about my background which they believed the "real" me could answer, and I couldn't. I later realized that the questions were based on Trans Union's error years earlier, when they were incorrectly convinced I had a certain second name and address several states away. I (after much willful stupidity and/or incompetence on TU's part) had gotten that sorted out, but the error had apparently propagated (with further garbling) to whatever source Nationwide was using and unwisely treating as gospel.

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