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Comment Re:infrastructure (Score 1) 57

I'm sure it will make sense to plenty of non-google engineers.

Unless those non-Google engineers have already heard of ftp, scp, rsync, etc.

The only real problem with sharing on home connections involves NAT, ISP ToS, etc: being findable and connectable. Rent a VPS and install OpenVPN on it, have your home fileserver connect to it, and it's solved.

Comment Re:Can Uber really make money at this? (Score 1) 121

Does it really make sense economically for Uber to get 100% of the cost of a ride this way but having to spend money to buy main, maintain and insure cars?

If you hypothesize that robot drivers can really do the job sufficiently well, the conclusion is an extremely strong and obvious yes. Taxis, limo services, etc are already viable business models even when you have all those same expenses plus a driver to pay. Remove the driver expense and it only gets more viable.

Or is this another sign of a company that doesn't know what it is doing, perhaps most recently suggested by the recent charges of sexism and sexual harassment?

It's possible they don't know what they're doing, but this certainly isn't a sign. It all comes down to whether or not you think robots perform as well as humans, and this story merely works from the conclusion that they can; it doesn't show any strengths or weaknesses of the premise itself.

Comment Re:Tools and movements (Score 1) 216

There is a pretty easy middle ground: multiple signatures per identity. You could then have authority(s) vouching for your identity, plus other people too. This makes it much easier to catch a defector. "Hey, how come the Turkish intelligence service (a CA that almost everyone trusts on the web) just signed this guy's brand new key, but Verisign hasn't?" (or better: "how come the federal CA and this guy's state CA disagree?")

Comment Re:Tools and movements (Score 1) 216

You simply can't have people not do "anything extra" while also being resistance to MitM. Part of HTTPS' success story is that it's easy enough to set up, but at the cost of being extremely vulnerable (by PGP standards) to MitM. So to anyone who knows how it works, it's "insecure" but people actually bother to use it, so it's about a trillion times more secure against totally passive attacks, than plaintext is. Thus, on average for all persons, the web is more secure than email.

PGP email needs some kind of "lame" mode (where people have keys but they're not carefully certified, maybe just signed by a robot CA), but easy enough that passive attacks are defeated. And it needs to be compatible with doing things right, so that people-who-care and people-who-don't-care get combined into the same network-effect.

The only problem with that, should be webmail. People would have to do something that compromises the secret key (either upload it to server, or make it available to javascript) and that would make it harder for anyone to ever transition from don't-care to care. We really need to wipe webmail off the planet; it offers nothing and costs a lot. And that's not going to happen, is it? :(

Comment Re:Floppy disks drilling & punching holes (Score 1) 612

For us cash strapped kids, cutting holes into single sided floppy disks was the only option, shortsighted or not.

No, there was one other, though it did require spending a little money. You go to Radio Shack and buy a switch/button/whatever. (Many to choose from.) Open up your 1541 (which is probably permanently semi-open anyway, from all the times you need to re-align the head), cut the wirse to the optical sensor which detects the hole, drill a hole in the front of the 1541's case, mount the switch into there, connect the sensor's wires to the switch....

BTW, whole discussion is Slashdot trolling old people into admitting they're old people.

Comment Re:I think it's safe to say that wouldn't hold up (Score 5, Insightful) 216

If it's an argument at all, it's one against all forms of criminal sentencing of any kind whatsoever, not just the death penalty.

I still can't believe some people think the sentences are what's wrong, instead of the inaccurate verdicts. It's as though people think that figuratively taking an innocent person's life by putting them in prison for decades (or life) isn't an irreparable injustice on par with murder.

I have to call total and complete bullshit on that. How about I imprison you for years, perhaps also as my rape-slave among other violations of your dignity and a total denial of the entire life you wanted to live, and let's see if you don't, at some point, say "I wish he'd just kill me."

Get the trial right!! That is where efforts are most needed.

Comment Re:Still optional (Score 2) 95

No. DMCA has been common fodder on Slashdot for .. oh shit, it's decades plural now, huh? Learn what it says, and also how courts have interpreted it. It's actually not that big of a topic.

I'm leaving out a lot of synonyms or near-synonyms, but basically: you're prohibited from bypassing a technological measure that limits access to a copyrighted work. Removing your computer's ability to descramble DRMed stuff is not a violation, because doing this does not provide you with access. It is perfectly legal, per DMCA, for you to do that.

(You might have violated a contract by deleting a shared library, though. DMCA aside, we saw some sweeping "judicial activism" in contract law, a few years ago. (Thanks, Blizzard and their customers.) It's possible that you [wave hands] did a thing [waving harder, look over here!] equivalent to signing a contact, where you magically (and unknowingly) (and possibly requiring time-travel) agreed to not alter or delete any of the proprietary software on your computer.)

Comment Re:AI does what AI is programmed to do (Score 1) 169

The "DANGER of AI" is that the AI will be somebody's bitch. Whose?

AI is "merely" another form of power, and adversaries-who-have-power are always a threat. Don't worry about AI; you should worry about $THEM getting AI, thereby causing $THEM to have an edge over you.

100.0% of techs are just like this. When you're pointing your nuclear missile at someone else, it's good. When someone else is pointing one at you, it's bad.

Comment Re: Who cares? (Score 1) 502

because its a giant scam you imbecile.

Duh? That's why everyone wants something done about it. Externalizing pollution to get an easy subsidy isn't merely a scam, it's an old and obvious scam.

The trouble is, everyone does it. If I tell you to stop scamming everyone, then you'll tell me to stop scamming everyone. It's all well and fine for me to try to stop paying for your subsidy, but you better keep on paying mine!

Comment Re:I still don't get it. (Score 1) 128

How was it NOT extortion before the law?

I haven't found the text of the law to read, but I can guess.

I used to work for a place where, in the late 1980s and early 1990s we would occasionally sell ransomware to clients who had iffy credit. Pay your bill every month, and we'd send you an update to our software. Stop paying or don't install your update, and a time bomb would go off: it fails to start. The software's data wasn't encrypted or anything, but it was in a proprietary undocumented form, so it was effectively unusable. (Unless you set back your machine's clock, which would have some annoying consequences for data entry speed.)

I think what we were doing would probably be considered ransomware to most people.

The reason I wouldn't call that extortion, is that the client would agree to it beforehand (and without any coercion or duress) and they would get something of value (our software) in exchange that they previously didn't have. Don't wanna do it? Don't sign the license agreement. (Yes, back in those days, a license was actually a real contract, and customers would sign it and we'd put it in a filing cabinet. No after-the-fact "surprise! you didn't really buy this in spite of having thought so at the time you parted with your money!")

I think what we were doing would probably not be considered extortion to most people. (But I'm still glad I don't do that anymore.)

Comment Re:liability, permits, hazmat, max hours on duty, (Score 2) 97

At many truck stops youll see a kiosk for OO's (owner-operators) to browse available jobs.

And remember, if you don't like what you find in the mission computer, you can always go to the bar. At the bar, there's oftentimes someone hanging around waiting to offer a job to anyone who walks in. Maybe they'll hit you up to move some shadier cargo/contraband, or they'll offer pirate bounties, or they might even try to recruit you from freight missions to doing combat missions for the military!

For the latter, make sure you have upgraded all your truck's weapons and gotten your combat rating and legal status up. Also, get expanded fuel tanks. Invariably there will be some deep strike mission far from any good place to refuel. So you'll either have to have big tanks, or you'll have to hunt enemy truckers to take their fuel to get you back home.

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